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Which Bike? Comments and Questions on what is the best bike for YOU, for YOUR trip. Note that we believe that ANY bike will do, so please remember that it's all down to PERSONAL OPINION. Technical Questions for all brands go in their own forum.
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  #31  
Old 4 Jun 2008
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OK, I think I understand now. Looks are very important to you. You are well and truly fixated on the Ténéré despite needing to sit on blankets. And you are not really interested in considering alternatives.

Best that you go and buy it. Good luck.

Tim
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  #32  
Old 4 Jun 2008
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Yes, look is important. Name me one commercially available and street-legal dual purpose bike that actually looks like a rallye bike? I think Tenere comes damned close, and yes I like the rallye look. I would have gone to the F800GS but the look just did not rock my world.

There seems to be kits for lowering the Tenere already and of course people who cut/reshape the foam on the seat. These are the stuff I will have to do if I get the bike, but of course, no dealer would do those modifications first for my test drive.
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  #33  
Old 4 Jun 2008
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I don't see how people like the look of the Tenere. Am I the only one that thinks it looks like a crasshopper?
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  #34  
Old 4 Jun 2008
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From left of centre

Possibly slightly off topic but I derive great happiness from having kept an Adventure bike for over 15 years now and updating it as we go, rather than going for some modern overmarketed piece of bling every couple of years. My old girl is tailored absolutely perfectly for my needs now.

It's a '93 Yam XTZ750 (UK to Cape Town/All around Europe/Top to bottom of the whole Middle East) that is having its third reincarnation at the moment, with a gorgeous 850 TDM (270 degree crank) engine and WR450 forks fitted. It will end up lighter than a KTM 990 Adventure and a BMW 12GS with its' Excel rims, Ohlins shock and other bits and bobs, and will definately be more reliable than a KTM. I've blasted it through sand dunes in Saudi Arabia, the mud of the Central African Republic and the German Autobahns - happy days

I know it doesn't directly answer your question but it's food for thought. I don't really keep a record of how much I've spent but over 15 years, but I think my period of bike ownership has been relatively cheap - good job few people think my way else we'd all be stuck in the stone age.

Don't believe the hype !
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  #35  
Old 6 Jun 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tmotten View Post
I don't see how people like the look of the Tenere. Am I the only one that thinks it looks like a crasshopper?
I am chinese, I used to watch the TV show Kung Fu, and I love the shape of the grasshopper!

I picked up some real-live stats from the Tenere owners:
at 3000 rpm = 90 Km/h
at 4000 rpm = around 118 km/h
at 5000 rpm = around 135 km/h
I can cruis at 140 km/h on highways (around 5200 rpm)

I think it is impressive for a single. If he can cruise at 140 which is my comfort speed anyway, I dig it! They are all at the vib-free range so it seems, as I read some reviews that the vibrations kick in at 5000rpm plus.

Hi Dick, I am wishing to reach to your zen-ness by keeping and riding one and only one bike for a very very long time. I had a BMW 1994 K75RT for a few years, but I wasn't zen enough to resist the temptations of new bikes. Thanks for your advise.

Last edited by josephau; 6 Jun 2008 at 09:00.
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  #36  
Old 6 Jun 2008
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My Dakar does that. Although now that I changed the gearing to a smaller front sprocket it's up in the 6k for 140, but fiddle with the gearing enough and most singles probably do that. Problem is that you'll pay for it in the dirt though. If you wanna do a lot of 'faster than the speed limit' riding, look for a 6 speed I reckon.
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  #37  
Old 6 Jun 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tmotten View Post
My Dakar does that. Although now that I changed the gearing to a smaller front sprocket it's up in the 6k for 140, but fiddle with the gearing enough and most singles probably do that. Problem is that you'll pay for it in the dirt though. If you wanna do a lot of 'faster than the speed limit' riding, look for a 6 speed I reckon.
What do you mean I'll pay for it in the dirt?

My comfort range is 120-140km/hr, which is sufficient for the autobahn, as I don't need and want any faster. Though I agree with you on a 6 speed such as my 1200GS if I want any faster.
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  #38  
Old 6 Jun 2008
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That was a generic 'you', not you personally.

What tmotten is referring to is the problem that bike manufacturers seem unable to grasp the need for a wide choice of ratios that can handle on one extreme the need for a very low offroad first gear, and at the other extreme a high top gear for road liaison stages. Even with a six-speed box BMW doesn't offer the ratios needed for the 12GS, and with a five speed box it's even more likely that bikes won't offer the two extremes, and if you raise the road gearing with different sprockets you adversely affect the offroad gearing.

Tim
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Last edited by Tim Cullis; 6 Jun 2008 at 22:06.
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  #39  
Old 6 Jun 2008
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6 speed with smaller front sprocket would seem to be the best answer, which is why I want an Elefant 900 (my 650 and 750 are 5 speed).

I had a look at the new tenere yesterday, can't say it looked serious in the flesh, good clearance though. but then I can't stand the big GS's either, too much gadgetry and just too big (for me anyway). I reckon the best way to go is to pick one camp and stay in it. I do love my big trailies, but realistically they are crap in the dirt compared to a dirt bike and no good near the limit on tarmac compared to a sports bike. My ideal garage would have a 450 single for dirt roads, a fireblade for tracks and a big trail bike (Elefant 900) with small wheels and road tyres for riding around and general touring.... one day....
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  #40  
Old 7 Jun 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Cullis View Post
That was a generic 'you', not you personally.

What tmotten is referring to is the problem that bike manufacturers seem unable to grasp the need for a wide choice of ratios that can handle on one extreme the need for a very low offroad first gear, and at the other extreme a high top gear for road liaison stages. Even with a six-speed box BMW doesn't offer the ratios needed for the 12GS, and with a five speed box it's even more likely that bikes won't offer the two extremes, and if you raise the road gearing with different sprockets you adversely affect the offroad gearing.

Tim
Exactly. Thanks Tim...
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  #41  
Old 8 Jun 2008
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Henryuk,
You hit the nail on the head, a garage full of different bikes for different riding. I have always said to my wife that I need about six bikes but for some reason she doesn't agree.
My V-Strom will do for now.
Cheers
Ian
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  #42  
Old 10 Jun 2008
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Josephau, get the Tenere while you can they seem to be sold out over here in the UK so I may have to wait till next year.

Lots of great views on this thread, and some good choices of bikes.

BMW new 650 gs (800) great bike great price but much more road biased.

BMW 800 gs great bike but expensive compared to Tenere

New Tenere - great looking bike, low seat height great price, - availabilty.

My choice is the Yamaha based on price and looks and all around ability. It seems to bridge a perfect gap in the market.

I am interested to see what Honda etc bring out but for the time being the Tenere has lots going for it.

Get one have fun and let us know what its like.
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  #43  
Old 10 Jun 2008
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Ohh there are also rumours of a new super tenere, that may upset the BMW 800 gs if they can undercut the price.

As far as a KTM adventure goes they are great bikes but you have to be pretty tall to ride them. At 5,7 I was struggling to put my tip toes on the floor in the dealers. let alone out on the trail.
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  #44  
Old 29 Jun 2008
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I did it! Yes, I traded my 2007 R1200GS for the Tenere. With only 130km on it after picking it up on friday (then got really ill so haven't been able to get the first 1000km), I am absolutely happy with the trade decision. Since I'm only 170cm tall, the bike is equipped with rear lowering kit (50mm) from alphatechnik.de and another 30mm seat reduction. This bike somehow rides even smoother than the test bike which was also spanking new. May be because it's MINE
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  #45  
Old 29 Jun 2008
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Talking

Looks great happy travels
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