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Which Bike? Comments and Questions on what is the best bike for YOU, for YOUR trip. Note that we believe that ANY bike will do, so please remember that it's all down to PERSONAL OPINION. Technical Questions for all brands go in their own forum.
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  #1  
Old 21 Apr 2004
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R 1200 GS

Thinking about chopping in my well-loved and well-used ST1100 (Pan-European) for a new R 1200 GS.

I've had a decent test ride on the GS, and was very impressed except for the reduction in wind protection/increased noise, which I suspect could be tiring on a long day - it's not unusual for me to do 500+ miles a day. I'm told the screen is far superior to the 1150 GS, but maybe I'm expecting a little too much? Or perhaps inevitably there will be aftermarket screens/mini-fairings?

The other thing I'd like to know, is whether the bike would be robust enough to carry me and my luggage on pistes such as the Morocco ones in Sahara Overland, without mods? Or would that be rather foolish anyway on a new bike? (it can't be as foolish as getting my Pan bogged down to the pipes in Saharan sand though!).

I appreciate it may be a bit soon for much knowledge to have accumulated on the 1200, but I am guessing that it is not that dis-similar to the 1150 regards build? Maybe being built lighter puts less stress on the bike? Also, as this is not an "Adventure" model, does this mean it's less robust? Or did the Adventure just have panniers and a few other ancillary items included over and above the "standard"?

Although after following this link (copied from another thread here), perhaps I should've kept my Electra-Glide. Amazing!

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showt...5&pagenumber=1

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  #2  
Old 21 Apr 2004
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Quote:
Originally posted by IanC:
Thinking about chopping in my well-loved and well-used ST1100 (Pan-European) for a new R 1200 GS.

I've had a decent test ride on the GS, and was very impressed except for the reduction in wind protection/increased noise, which I suspect could be tiring on a long day - it's not unusual for me to do 500+ miles a day. I'm told the screen is far superior to the 1150 GS, but maybe I'm expecting a little too much? Or perhaps inevitably there will be aftermarket screens/mini-fairings?

The other thing I'd like to know, is whether the bike would be robust enough to carry me and my luggage on pistes such as the Morocco ones in Sahara Overland, without mods? Or would that be rather foolish anyway on a new bike? (it can't be as foolish as getting my Pan bogged down to the pipes in Saharan sand though!).

I appreciate it may be a bit soon for much knowledge to have accumulated on the 1200, but I am guessing that it is not that dis-similar to the 1150 regards build? Maybe being built lighter puts less stress on the bike? Also, as this is not an "Adventure" model, does this mean it's less robust? Or did the Adventure just have panniers and a few other ancillary items included over and above the "standard"?

Although after following this link (copied from another thread here), perhaps I should've kept my Electra-Glide. Amazing!

http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=29723&perpage=15&pagenu mber=1

Can't see why the 1200 would not be suitable. The weight loss over the 1150 can only be a good thing. I thinkyou can already buy aftermarket screens etc in/from Germany?

I looke at a 1200 last week & the subframe certainly looks beefier. I've heard of some complain that the 1150 rear rack is prone to flexing when loaded, there is a part to reinforce it though - worth checking this out on the 1200?

The 1150 Adventure was just a GS with longer suspension, 30 ltr tank, couple of modified gear ratios, fender extender, different screen(?) & different panniers.

BTW if you an Electr Glide in to the Desert, we want photo's!

Steve
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  #3  
Old 21 Apr 2004
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Thanks Steve

Re. off-road Harleys, check the link I posted if you haven't already (first one, not mine)!

I'm sure it'll be possible to improve the wind situation, with such a popular bike (although I phoned Powerbronze, and was surprised when they said they had no plans for a screen for this model for this year). I do have an email in to Aeroflow, but no reply yet.

I think what I'm really trying to establish is how capable/tough the GS's are off-road out of the crate. I don't really want to start a lot of mods on a brand new bike, nor wreck it on it's first African trip. In either case, I'd be better off with a s/hand 1150 - but then I also want a bike close in capability to my Pan on long road trips.

I'm no stranger to off-road, having raced MX (a few years ago!) and grown up with trials and trail bikes. I'm just not sure how "at home" the standard GS's are off the black stuff?

I did however test the 1200GS last week, and did try a few (5?) miles off-road accross the tank tracks at Sidbury Hill (Salisbury Plain), but didn't think I should push a nearly-new demo bike hard off-road! What I did felt fine though, apart from grounding a couple of times - probably should've wound the suspension up.

One other question - I think the new GS has a catalytic converter - is this a problem in areas with only leaded fuel available, as in S Maroc?

Ian

[This message has been edited by IanC (edited 21 April 2004).]
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Old 21 Apr 2004
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Hi Ian

There's chapter and verse, inc. lots of off road impressions, in www.ukgser.com Apologies if you've already been there!

Mick
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  #5  
Old 22 Apr 2004
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Golden Rule: never buy the first in a series of anything.

The 1200 is chocker full with electronics, replacing the wiring loom with a local area network. ADAC reports from Germany a steadily increasing number of vehicles breaking down due to electronic problems.

What do you do in the desert if the kill switch transceiver fails to work and the bike refuses to run?

We ignored the GR 3 years ago and bought one of the first 1100RS second hand, low mileage and paid dearly. (Dead clutch 25k, dead gearbox 45k.)

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  #6  
Old 22 Apr 2004
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will the old 1150gs still be available. I like it better than r1200gs looks cheap to me with all the palstic.

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Old 22 Apr 2004
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Thanks all.

I did actually look on www.ukgser.com yesteday, but not all of it!

I'm afraid that although I know the Golden Rule to be right, I'm a complete sucker for "the latest"! I'm usually on the latest Windows version before most.

beddhist - are you saying that there are lots of reports of 1200 GS [electronic] breakdowns, or bikes generally or even vehicles generally? Not familiar with "ADAC".

I'd like to think the 1200 was the latest in the series, but perhaps it is so changed it is in fact the first.

I do remember buying my Electra-Glide (mentioned earlier this thread) in '96, which was one of the first Electronically Fuel-injected Harleys. A lot of people advised to leave it for a year or two - but it was fine (and that was a Harley!) Could be a bit more of a problem in the DZ though.

[This message has been edited by IanC (edited 21 April 2004).]
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Old 22 Apr 2004
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I fully understand not wanting to buy a new bike & then spend ££££ kitting it out. Why not look for a modified second hand 1150GS? There are plenty about with good panniers, crash protection, GPS etc. Buy a used Adventure tank & the matching seat as well?

BTW, I prefer the looks of the 1100/1150 to the 1200.

As Beddhist stated, I'd never buy in the first production year of a new model, especially one where there are significant changes all round. I've heard of recalls on the 1200 already - transmission & oil leak problems? I also wonder how easy it is to add electrical accessories with the single wire electrics fitted to the 1200?

Steve

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  #9  
Old 23 Apr 2004
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Ian,

The ADAC is Germany's biggest automobile club and operates a breakdown service. I don't think they keep stats on bikes, so this refers to cars.

Steve: adding electrics is theoretically easy. You wire it directly to the battery. You'll end up with a bike with a LAN AND a small wiring loom!

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Old 23 Apr 2004
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Thanks, Steve & beddhist.

Although I'd got my heart set on the new 1200, you're right, it's best to let someone else sort through the teething problems.

I'm going to keep an eye out for a 1150 Adventure and keep the Pan (for probably similar money). It'll be interesting to see what gets the most ridden, and maybe chop 'em both in for a Mk II 1200 in a year or so.

The idea of relying on a LAN in the desert is horiffic!

[This message has been edited by IanC (edited 23 April 2004).]
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Old 23 Apr 2004
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Quote:
Originally posted by beddhist:
Ian,

The ADAC is Germany's biggest automobile club and operates a breakdown service. I don't think they keep stats on bikes, so this refers to cars.

Steve: adding electrics is theoretically easy. You wire it directly to the battery. You'll end up with a bike with a LAN AND a small wiring loom!

I prefer not to wire direct to the battery. I'd rather tap in to a wire that's live only when the ignition's switched on.

Steve

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