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Dutch Dylan 26 Oct 2009 20:01

Good Road Bike For Beginner
 
Hi all, I'm currently looking to buy my first motorcycle and could do with some help. I'm planning on riding it on road only, so no off-road adventures for me (at first). I do plan on making some long trips, so some comfort would be a big plus and I do like tourbikes. But the most important for me is that it won't be too pricy, of course second hand is no problem so it doesn't have to be a new model. Anyway I was hoping for some guidance from you guys, maybe some experiences with bikes, or some basic information for each make.
I hope you get I'm a newbie to all this and I could do with any :helpsmilie:. Personally I like bikes like the Moto Guzzi California, but I have no idea of how any of them ride or how reliable they are.

Greetings from The Netherlands.

Pigford 26 Oct 2009 20:10

HOW LONGS A PIECE OF STRING???????

Very tough question..... What size engine...how far/fast you wanna travel?

The later Kawasaki ER-6 is a good little bike, and the slightly older Suzuki SV650 is a great bike for beginners & experienced riders! Both well priced secondhand!

Honda CBR600 (a bit more sporty) is a good choice too, common as muck, but well made & good road bike!

Definitely stick with either Jap or German bikes.....

I don't know you country regards bike supplies, but good luck!

BarryA 27 Oct 2009 22:16

Good Road Bike For Beginner
 
Hi Dutch Dylan,

Well I can only give my opinion.

I have just recently bought a 2nd hand 2001 Yamaha FZS600 Fazer in the last couple of days. I wasn't looking for what can be classed as a sports tourer but i had my own list of things i wanted and although never would have thought i'd end up with this bike - going for what i wanted led me to it. I plan to do some trips on it and i know its not the bike that a lot (on here maybe) would recommend but i went more on the "smile" factor and the "yeah this feels nice" when i sat on it test. I have got to say i felt confident when i sat on it in the showroom and after my first 100 mile non-stop round trip on B roads round the *North East i am more convinced than ever that it's the right bike for my needs at present. I am 6FT 1in and found the "sit up" style of the Yam almost the only bike i was 100% confident and comfy on.

It was relatively cheap, got a few miles but its a Yam and can't say anything about the bike so far has me worried. Everybody i talked to said for the money i wanted to spend to buy Jap.

Its my first "big bike" and although at first it took a bit to get to grips with its never dropped the smile off my face since i got it. Its as comfy as the sofa in my front room and can do everything and anything that i can throw at it and still leaves me wanting more.

Like Pigford said give a few more details about the sort of bike you are after or more realistically can afford. I wanted a 600 (not to big and scary) reliable (hence looked at Jap) with a fairing, comfy, cheap, gonna get some miles out of it, wouldn't outgrow in a week, gave confidence and with good maintenance should last. This led me to my "right" bike.

Barry.

*of England

Miquel-Silvestre 29 Oct 2009 20:20

Don´t buy italians, they are not reliable; do not buy BMWs, they are too expensive; do not buy japanese bikes, they are not cool; do not buy Harleys, they are too bad; do noy buy korean bikes, they are too cheap; do not buy KTMs, they are too complicated; do not buy Urals, they are too tough; do not buy second hand bikes, they are too old; do not buy brand new bikes, they are going to fleece you just for nothing.

Ok, do not buy a bike at all. Perhaps you should buy a car like most of the people do. If millons of flies like to eat s...t, they can´t be wrong.

Of course, It is a joke. Buy whatever bike you can afford and you like. All of them are perfect and all of them are bad. Enjoy the bad weather and the risk of be killed by one stupid dummy driving a 4x4. Welcome to the best hell ever.

Pigford 29 Oct 2009 20:30

Quote:

Originally Posted by Miquel-Silvestre (Post 262111)
Don´t buy italians, they are not reliable; do not buy BMWs, they are too expensive; do not buy japanese bikes, they are not cool; do not buy Harleys, they are too bad; do noy buy korean bikes, they are too cheap; do not buy KTMs, they are too complicated; do not buy Urals, they are too tough; do not buy second hand bikes, they are too old; do not buy brand new bikes, they are going to fleece you just for nothing.

Ok, do not buy a bike at all. Perhaps you should buy a car like most of the people do. If millons of flies like to eat s...t, they can´t be wrong.

Of course, It is a joke. Buy whatever bike you can afford and you like. All of them are perfect and all of them are bad. Enjoy the bad weather and the risk of be killed by one stupid dummy driving a 4x4. Welcome to the best hell ever.

Not very encouraging, but accurate :eek3:

As Miquel says, just go with your gut instinct and heart, and ENJOY :clap:

Common sense is good a guide as anything! If the bike starts and run OK, doesn't smoke (too much) handles OK, the hopefully it'll do you well :thumbup1:
Let us know what you're considering if you want some more comments - BUT, some will say GOOD, others will say BAD :confused1:

oldbmw 29 Oct 2009 21:00

I wont suggest the origin of your intended purchase. Buy a bike you like, but try to choose one with a low centre of gravity and an engine that develops torque well down the rev range. It ought to be good handling, but you will need to learn a bit before you can judge that. As it happens in my opinion, the MG california or Breva 750 are near the mark in that respect, although tending towards top heavy. A low centre of gravity means the bike will probably self centre and recover from running over a brick at night without falling over. It is no guarantee of course, steering and other geometries all play their part. In my view life is easier if both wheels are the same size. Ensure you get both side and centre stands with it as it makes life easier. The other thing is check out its range on a tank of fuel, make sure it can meet your needs. A trip setting on the Speedo is also useful and not easy to add after purchase.
good luck

Flyingdoctor 30 Oct 2009 08:23

Don't overlook trail bikes as they make great road bikes. They tend to be lighter than road bikes and are usualy easier to work on. Otherwise just get what you fancy, if you don't like it you can always sell it and get something else. Most bikes have dedicated websites so the amount of help and advice available makes things a lot easier these days so if you want a Guzzi california, go for it! :scooter:

doosey 30 Oct 2009 09:16

it does not matter what you buy, so long as it makes you grin like a lunatic:thumbup1: and it will only lead to another bike and then another not to mention all the things you MUST have to go with the bike and then before you know it you cant live without the bloody things!! me ,i own jap, it scares the crap out of me:D i also own italian, wont go further than walking distance from home on it:thumbup1:love it to bits, also own bmw, its too big too heavy too expensive takes up more room than the car, cant enough of the damn thing,

either way you will always wish you had bought that other bike, then go out and buy it as well:thumbup1:

pheonix 1 Nov 2009 21:45

Dylan, I've owned many Guzzi's and have been lucky to find them quite reliable and with bags of character - perhaps not the best 1st bike to own. I would suggest asking other Guzzi owners about their bikes and found a Guzzi club in the Netherlands:
MGCN : Welkom bij de Moto Guzzi Club Nederland
There are other online groups such as Squadra placeholder where owners post messages from all over the world.

My only other piece of advice is to book some test rides and see what fits you best. Enjoy :)

m2catter 2 Nov 2009 00:10

Good day mate,
In my humble opinion first bike shoudn't be too strong or fast. Around the 70hp mark is plenty. Learning to ride safe and properly is the main thing.
I personally enjoy more of an upright riding position. So in that respect I think off two very good bikes, the

Kawasaki Versys 650

and the

Suzuki SV 650

The Suzuki might have the edge on long distance riding, the Versys on small winding country roads. Both are reliable, it is a matter of personal preferences,

all the best and good luck Michael


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