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  #1  
Old 6 Aug 2008
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Lowering A Tiger

Hi all,

I'm looking at buying a Triumph Triger 955i 2002 model. However, it is quite a tall bike and I have a little difficult touching the ground when I'm on it.

Are there any ways to lower these bikes?

Cheers,

gaZ

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  #2  
Old 6 Aug 2008
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I managed at 5'6" on both my Tigers

Last edited by mollydog; 26 Mar 2009 at 17:49.
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  #3  
Old 6 Aug 2008
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lowering the tiger

Quote:
Originally Posted by gaZ1976 View Post
Hi all,

I'm looking at buying a Triumph Triger 955i 2002 model. However, it is quite a tall bike and I have a little difficult touching the ground when I'm on it.

Are there any ways to lower these bikes?

Cheers,

gaZ

Had to lower my 03 tiger. Rotate the rear chain adjusters so the axle is at the top and not the bottom. Slide your fork tubes half an inch up through the clamps. You will need to put a 10ml spacer under the back mount of the chain guard and keep an eye on the rubbing strip under the swing arm. I put an extra piece of nylon on the rubbing block. Can give more info and a piccy if you want.

It will handle like a dream, well mine does anyway. 90% of my riding is two up. My lady is an absolutely perfect weight for a pillion and she gets to scrape her boots on the odd fang through the mountains. Be careful though. bent a gear lever the other day and it cost me $100au to replace. Dam we were having fun though. Holwell Gorge for those who are in Tassie
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  #4  
Old 7 Aug 2008
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Lowering a tiger

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wilky View Post
Had to lower my 03 tiger. Rotate the rear chain adjusters so the axle is at the top and not the bottom. Slide your fork tubes half an inch up through the clamps. You will need to put a 10ml spacer under the back mount of the chain guard and keep an eye on the rubbing strip under the swing arm. I put an extra piece of nylon on the rubbing block. Can give more info and a piccy if you want.

It will handle like a dream, well mine does anyway. 90% of my riding is two up. My lady is an absolutely perfect weight for a pillion and she gets to scrape her boots on the odd fang through the mountains. Be careful though. bent a gear lever the other day and it cost me $100au to replace. Dam we were having fun though. Holwell Gorge for those who are in Tassie
Thanks Wilky!! Just the info I was after. If it's no trouble I would appreciate a little more information and a pic would be great.

Cheers,

gaZ
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  #5  
Old 7 Aug 2008
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Sorry,
I forget to mention the concentric chain adjusters.

Last edited by mollydog; 26 Mar 2009 at 17:50.
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Old 8 Aug 2008
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from my experience of Tigers (looked great, did not like the handling one bit) I would recommend one of two ways to 'lower' them - either set fire to it or drive a big lorry over it. Taking the wheels off would also lower it and also improve the ride.... (only joking to all you Tiger owners!!)

If you want a GREAT big traillie someone in Germany is selling a Cagiva Elefant 900 ie gt -the best one ever made!!
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Old 9 Aug 2008
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lowering a tiger

[quote=henryuk;201569]from my experience of Tigers (looked great, did not like the handling one bit) I would recommend one of two ways to 'lower' them - either set fire to it or drive a big lorry over it. Taking the wheels off would also lower it and also improve the ride.... (only joking to all you Tiger owners!!)

Infidel, someone throw this man to the lions

gaZ1976, will organise a couple of pics for you asap, especially the modification to the chain slipper on the swing arm. Only problem is my digital died an ungraceful death and have not replaced it yet.
Something else I remembered as well was I put a slightly heavier grade oil in the forks. This made a huge difference to nose dive under brakes.
Cheers
Wilky
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Old 9 Aug 2008
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[not to troll or anything]
Tigers are certainly not for everyone. I've had mine for just over 6 months, I can't wait to get rid of it. Not only is it too tall, but also too heavy, too fuel inefficient, and with the height and weight, I'd not trust it on anything but asphalt. Attempts to do tracks, gravel and anything non-sealed have had me wincing and at worse dropping it, not to mention a torn tendon in my forearm from over-exerting trying to hold the mammoth weight of it (quarter of a tonne) up, whilst trying to keep the brake applied.

I did buy it with the intentions of waving the British flag on my travels in a subtle way. Now, I'd rather buy a union jack and ride a small jap bike any day.

The reason for me writing this is for you to make an informed decision about buying a triumph, I wish someone had given me something to go on prior to spending several grand on a something I was not going to like.
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Old 9 Aug 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neil View Post
Tigers are certainly not for everyone. I've had mine for just over 6 months, I can't wait to get rid of it. Not only is it too tall, but also too heavy, too fuel inefficient, and with the height and weight,
I don't understand the fuel ineficient part of your post. My 955 Tiger does 50mpg everywhere. It doesn't matter if I go fast or slow, fully loaded or travel light, it never varies by any more than 1 or 2 miles per gallon. For a bike with an engine pushing 1litre that's not bad. My son's 600 Suzuki Bandit uses more petrol than my Tiger
It is, however, very tall and if it's too tall for you it can be a handfull I guess.
Jim
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  #10  
Old 9 Aug 2008
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Asking a 1000cc bike to be light and agile off road is akin to asking for a miracle If your idea of riding includes a lot of trails, think carefully about your purchase. I take my 1200 Trophy up the odd track (for camping) and it's a handful to say the least, but I know my, and the bikes limitations
Cake and eat it anyone?

It can be done, but not by everyone



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  #11  
Old 9 Aug 2008
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I totally agree with both of you, but however: knowing your limitations and/or your vehicles limitations is paramount to your riding experience. I would like that to be taken on board by anyone thinking about buying a new bike ... Triumph or any other brand, and the tiger is limited (for me).

As for fuel efficiency, 50mpg is not good enough for me, but that's to do with my own issues with the environment. My figure is more like 40mpg on a 2004 tiger. Personally I find it appalling. However, Norway did give me more MPG due to the speed of the roads and not needing to vary gears or stop too often.
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Old 9 Aug 2008
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The Tiger is certainly no trail bike.

Last edited by mollydog; 26 Mar 2009 at 17:50. Reason: pics
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  #13  
Old 10 Aug 2008
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I ride mine 99% on roads, the odd dirt road doesn't faze but if I wanted a full on dual purpose I would probably go back to a 660 Tenere. Did plenty off touring miles on one and it was more than capable off road and excellent on dirt backroads.

I bought the Tiger because I really liked the riding position, it is superbly comfortable for my partner on the back. Handles a good load, and I find it amazing in tight twisty roads of which we have an amazing variety in Tasmania. Scared the pants of many a sport bike rider.

It suits my style of riding and I would not hesitate in recomending one.

At the end of the day though YOU have to way up what YOU want out of the bike.

Cheers
Wilky
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Old 10 Aug 2008
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I made a misinformed decision when I purchased my tiger and the Triumph salesman help lead me down that path too. In order for less people to be as disgruntled as I am/was. I have said what I have said that anyone taking on a Tiger has their eyes wide opened.

I should have spent my money more wisely for what I wanted.
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  #15  
Old 16 Jul 2011
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I've ridden my '02 Tiger over many thousands of British Columbia back roads, forestry roads, mining haul roads, ski-doo trails (in summer), mountain and coastal tracks with full camping gear on board. Never a problem. It isn't a bike I'd take in loose, deep sand if it is avoidable but anywhere else, no problem. I always ask myself after these trips...where were all the much vaunted GS's. The only place I ever see them is on the pavement.
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