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Travellers' questions that don't fit anywhere else This is an opportunity to ask any question, and post any notice you wish that doesn't fit into one of the other sections.
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  #46  
Old 7 Aug 2007
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Sorry...

Yes sorry - I'm very guilty of starting these rambling discussions - I'm the same in the pub after several pints ;-)

Lorraine - yes I see what you're saying, on the trips I'm planning now I've been working hard to make sure I'm never out of contact, making sure I can update my blog and send my photos home, making sure people know where I am at all times... perhaps it would be a 'real' adventure for me if I left it all at home!

As far as the old explorer accounts go - yeah your right - they're very technical - 'today we travelled 20 leagues south until we encountered a land with people who wore no clothes. We landed and told them the Lord would not be happy'.

Feeling invincible? I'm not sure, in older times ship captains would make a point of having their affairs in order before they left, today I doubt any of us would even think of making sure our will was in order and our insurance was up to date.

Kass55 - why didn't I think of that? - just look it up damn it! (much like I had to Dromomania ) I don't think it's a case of some people being a little snooty about being 'adventure motorcyclist' - although I think there are some people like that - it's more that I caught myself becoming snooty about other people preparations, and their kit and 'they're not really taking this thing seriously' - and I just thought that was insane.... and then that got me thinking... which is always a very very bad idea !

Right, I'm going outside for a cup of tea, I may be some time.
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  #47  
Old 7 Aug 2007
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Dromomania. Well that is interesting. This reminds of someone who used to live in Egypt who said, 'The great thing about being an expat is you get to reinvent yourself every time you move.' Perhaps that's an unpsychotic, less 'mental' condition of dromomania.

As for the insurance issues, I know plenty nowadays who DO make sure all their affairs are in order before their departure dates. So there goes my theory of invinsibility. ;-) But it sounded good, didn't it???
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  #48  
Old 7 Aug 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lorraine View Post
As for the insurance issues, I know plenty nowadays who DO make sure all their affairs are in order before their departure dates. So there goes my theory of invinsibility. ;-) But it sounded good, didn't it???
Lorraine
Yes sounded very good! Very tough!
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  #49  
Old 12 Aug 2007
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Amâ„¢ ;-)

Dare I claim that I first coined the term in the mid 90s? No, I better not but Lorraine's
--- " veering away from your comfort zone."---
is always the way I've defined it. IMO for most of us from the privileged 'West' that means independently travelling in Africa, Asia or Latin America where just regular riding is challenging and unpredictable (partly because we are conspicuous and unusual).
Back in Europe or with support in the 'Adv Zone' it's a holiday or touring. It can be physically demanding but the defining mental challenge is largely missing because what's the worst that can happen? Of course adventures can befall us anywhere but in the A Zone it's guaranteed which is why we are attracted to it.

I agree the A-word is being watered down - it's a look you can buy but that's to be expected; I bet if Golden Wonder sold Adventure Crisps they would be a hit. A mag about trail biking in the US that used to be called Dual Sport News renamed itself 'Adv M'cycle (DSN)'. One story I read was about a bloke who slipped on a log and got lost in the woods one Sunday. A raccoon ran off with his packed lunch and it took him a while to get back to the car.

To me AM is about not being certain how a long journey will work out but taking the chance anyway, cutting loose and putting your faith in your resourcefulness - and encountering the world on the way. Even if we think there are lots of us here on HU, only a tiny minority takes the risk which I believe still takes guts.

Chris S
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  #50  
Old 12 Aug 2007
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From the horses mouth himself thank you Chris - beautifully put .

Why didn't I think to even ask the gentleman behind Adventure Motorcycling ~ the website of the Adventure Motorcycling Handbook !?



Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Scott View Post
Dare I claim that I first coined the term in the mid 90s? No, I better not but Lorraine's
--- " veering away from your comfort zone."---
is always the way I've defined it. IMO for most of us from the privileged 'West' that means independently travelling in Africa, Asia or Latin America where just regular riding is challenging and unpredictable (partly because we are conspicuous and unusual).
Back in Europe or with support in the 'Adv Zone' it's a holiday or touring. It can be physically demanding but the defining mental challenge is largely missing because what's the worst that can happen? Of course adventures can befall us anywhere but in the A Zone it's guaranteed which is why we are attracted to it.

I agree the A-word is being watered down - it's a look you can buy but that's to be expected; I bet if Golden Wonder sold Adventure Crisps they would be a hit. A mag about trail biking in the US that used to be called Dual Sport News renamed itself 'Adv M'cycle (DSN)'. One story I read was about a bloke who slipped on a log and got lost in the woods one Sunday. A raccoon ran off with his packed lunch and it took him a while to get back to the car.

To me AM is about not being certain how a long journey will work out but taking the chance anyway, cutting loose and putting your faith in your resourcefulness - and encountering the world on the way. Even if we think there are lots of us here on HU, only a tiny minority takes the risk which I believe still takes guts.

Chris S
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  #51  
Old 12 Aug 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Scott View Post
To me AM is about not being certain how a long journey will work out but taking the chance anyway, cutting loose and putting your faith in your resourcefulness - and encountering the world on the way. Even if we think there are lots of us here on HU, only a tiny minority takes the risk which I believe still takes guts.

Chris S
As I head out solo into the Salar de Uyuni and the patchwork of roads south to San Pedro de Atacama, on my fuel-injection 650GS Dakar that doesn't want to start when in the cold and at altitudes above 3000m, I was thinking I was being stupid. Its nice to know I'm just doing the AM thing.

I just bought another liter of alcohol for my Trangia stove - if the bike won't start, I'll light a fire under it and warm up the engine oil (exhibiting resourcefulness!). At the same time, its potable, made from cane, so if the bike won't start, I may not care.

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  #52  
Old 12 Aug 2007
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Chuck I expect to see your own `Israeli backpacker sans ropa` efforts on the salt flats.

And no being cold doesn`t cut it. I was damn cold too!
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  #53  
Old 12 Aug 2007
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Well I now have my very own definition of Adventure Motorcycling.

This afternoon I've been digging through a huge box of photos my grandmother has given me and came across this

A very young me on a scooter on Flickr - Photo Sharing!

now tell me that's not an adventure!
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  #54  
Old 12 Aug 2007
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Also, on some systems turn on the key... wait about 20 secs. then start.

Last edited by mollydog; 26 Mar 2009 at 06:49.
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  #55  
Old 12 Aug 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mollydog View Post
Try warming the air intake sensor rather than risk burning your bike to the ground. I don't know F650's but it might be in the air box somewhere? Just touch it to warm up....might work? Check plug to see if it's black. If it is...you have an FI problem.

Or open up air box a bit. Also, on my Vstrom I always disconnect the battery after going up to altitude....wait 3 minutes...then re-connect. The computer will then re-boot and adjust to new altitude/pressure parameters when you start up.

Also, on some systems turn on the key... wait about 20 secs. then start. This gives the computer time to "learn" from sensor data and make adjustments. If you just crank right up the computer may just go to default settings which may not be optimized for 12,000 ft.
It's a programming thing. In September, 2006, BMW sent out a service bulletin regarding a fix for the 'hard start' problems. With a couple replacement throttle control springs, and a reprogrammed unit, it should be better.

Of course, none of the dealers in Ecuador or Peru know about this. You'd have thought BMW would have clued the high-altitude folks in on this problem of hard starting at altitude - sent them a gross of them springs (for free!) and made sure they had the software update.

I've tried everything you've mentioned - its a problem with the bike - one of the first of the dual spark 2005 models sold in the US. Unfortunately, I've been outside the US for the past year, can't get a fix here in SA. Otherwise, teh bike runs fine at altitude. It just won't start.

(I got me some jumper cables - just need a passing 12v battery and I'm alright).
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  #56  
Old 13 Aug 2007
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"As I head out solo into the Salar de Uyuni and the patchwork of roads south to San Pedro de Atacama, on my fuel-injection 650GS Dakar that doesn't want to start when in the cold and at altitudes above 3000m, I was thinking I was being stupid. Its nice to know I'm just doing the AM thing."



This is probably no help whatsoever but last winter my wife's car started exhibiting similar symptoms (without the altitude bit) - would just not start from cold but was then perfectly normal for days before playing up again. We eventually called out the AA and the patrolman checked the usual stuff - sparks, fuel etc. He then poured about 50ml of petrol from a bottle straight down the throttle body and cranked it over. It fired up straight away.
Lesson learnt for me because this is the sort of thing I've been doing for decades with bikes and older cars that won't start but this new fuel injected stuff, it's much more sophisticated and you don't want to mess with it, right? Well it's still an internal combustion engine underneath all the wiring and a bit of "manual override" might be applied now and then. If heating the engine up with the stove is taking too long try tipping some of the Trangia fuel straight into the engine!
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  #57  
Old 13 Aug 2007
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Adventure begins... when the money runs out.
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  #58  
Old 14 Aug 2007
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"Adventure begins... when the money runs out."

Well said. Or, when the bike/van starts making funny sounds and you pull over and someone else does too t see if they can help. Or you take a 'wrong' turn and get lost. Or you throw away your guide book. Etc. etc etc.

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  #59  
Old 16 Aug 2007
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Just back to civilization (Salta, Arg.) from doing the SW of Bolivia (Salar de Uyuni). At the Laguna Colorado stopover (where there's shelter for the traveler), I was able to get a jump from a 4-wheel vehicle. It took about 5 minutes of cranking, but it finally started (probably warmed up a bit from all the cranking). That was at 4600m, and around -10C that a.m. It had been inside the hut all night. I had it parked inside a hostel the night before in San Juan, just south of the Salar where it was under 4000m but the air temp was well above freezing. Started that morning, with a minimum of cranking - no jump required.

The ride was damn tough for a fully loaded 650 (me, the bike, all my gear weigh in at 850 lbs.). Made it without problems, without crashing (one drop) - glad to be out of there!

Now I'm at 1500m and it starts just fine. I shouldn't have any more starting problems - at least not due to the altitude.

Let the next adventure begin! (Ruta 40)
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  #60  
Old 16 Aug 2007
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Wow, sounds like a great ride. Where am I off? Are you carrying camping gear?



Total : 760 lbs. ??

Last edited by mollydog; 26 Mar 2009 at 06:51.
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