Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > All Miscellaneous questions > Travellers' questions that don't fit anywhere else

Travellers' questions that don't fit anywhere else This is an opportunity to ask any question, and post any notice you wish that doesn't fit into one of the other sections.
Contact Overland Solutions for all your custom modifications and setup for overland travel.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #91  
Old 20 Aug 2009
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: portsmouth
Posts: 29
i think it's mainly the steroetypes bikers have been given by the media (and sometimes each other) and it's being enforced on the younger generations. Example; cruiser riders are now deeply associated with gang cultures and violence, sports bike riders are known for speeding, using roads as racecourses and doing idiotic stunts on the roads, while the classic bike riders are seen as the slow people who brake down alot and get in the way and harley riders are seen as fair weather poofs.....
I was brought up to believe all that, from teachers to my dad (harley rider), to people tutting in the street and muttering things seeing bikers go past. Plus with all the media attention on a few pricks from some well known biker gangs, most younger riders tend to just keep their heads down and not even look up for fear of upsetting anyone (experience). Btw does anyone agree that the blokey who went on tv and spoke about the ha guys murder with the infamous quote " well these things happen, they shouldn't but they do" is a proper dickhead? Face it with people like that as the mouth piece of bikers, we're ****ed!
But back to the real point i then met a really nice cutdown wearing old school leather clad sweetheart and he taught me a helluva lot, he always stopped for bikers, even scooter riders, never had a bad word to say about anyone, and he waved at everyone including scooter riders, how many of you include those as bikers. Cos they're gonna be on the big machines soon enough and if everyone ignores them, they're gonna be abit like "why the **** should i wave back at you when y'all ignored me for years?" maybe that has summit to do with it????? And cruiser riders bitching at sportsbike riders for being crazy, sportsbike riders seeing everyone as beneath them (read the first page of this thread, theres one of those there) and everyone else pottering along trying to be friendly and being seen as a daft old hippy biker. My guess is the only way to get back the friendly waves and nods is to go back to the bike meets, have a chat with anyone and everyone regardless of what they ride (there's abit too much of a clique culture going on, not pointing fingers sporties) and carry on waving away until it catches on again and spreads like swine flu, and always include the scooter riders. Dear god, imagine for a second if every biker had a chat with the teens on their scooters and 125's, passing on valuable knowledge and the deep love and respect for machines you all have and the mentality of biking culture. Just imagine how much safer the roads could be and how improved the public view of us?????
__________________
***Sorry, can you repeat that......Err what was that again***
Reply With Quote
  #92  
Old 20 Aug 2009
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Sunderland, UK
Posts: 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by twinkle star View Post
"well these things happen, they shouldn't but they do" is a proper dickhead? Face it with people like that as the mouth piece of bikers, we're ****ed!
That's not really something you want to be shouting about, especially if you're going to put that much info in your profile.

Quote:
Originally Posted by twinkle star View Post
he waved at everyone including scooter riders, how many of you include those as bikers. Cos they're gonna be on the big machines soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by twinkle star View Post
imagine for a second if every biker had a chat with the teens on their scooters and 125's, passing on valuable knowledge and the deep love and respect for machines you all have and the mentality of biking culture.
How do you work that one out?

Most of those are 16yo's with Chinese scooters bought on eBay for £500. Very few have any intention of sticking with 2 wheels once they're 17. As soon as they're old enough and have the cash to buy a Saxo/Clio/Corsa, they'll be finished with bikes until the mid-life crisis comes around. Look at the new registration figures for 50cc scoots. There's not enough bikes above 125cc on the new and used market to go round if all those kids decided to take it further than CBT.

Old Vespa and Lambretta owners are a different story. Speak to the real "old school" scooter riders who are involved in their club scene. You'll find many have got a real chip on their shoulder about bikers and are still living in the days of mods and rockers, where as most bikers couldn't care less. I will nod to them and it's their problem if they don't wave back.

Quote:
Originally Posted by twinkle star View Post
sportsbike riders seeing everyone as beneath them (read the first page of this thread, theres one of those there)

...not pointing fingers sporties...
That's obviously aimed at the likes of me. You're tarring everyone with the same brush. What was that about being cliquey?

Actually, some (but certainly not all) of the most cliquey riders I've found, that won't wave or stop for anyone unless they're riding the same are Pan-European riders. That's their problem though.
I know of a Pan rider who went to talk to people on a Pan riders club stand at a show recently and his face mustn't have fitted because they just didn't want to know him.
I tried to start a conversation with a UK reg Pan rider and pillion on the Grossglockner last year. We were stopped while the road was cleared of falling rocks so nothing else to do. What a pair of miserable ****s.
A******* off the bike = A******* on the bike.

Still, I'll nod to them and it's their problem if they don't.
Reply With Quote
  #93  
Old 21 Aug 2009
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: portsmouth
Posts: 29
equations

maybe if you chatted to them then they would stick with bikes too?? I have both. It's not aimed at you, rather the groups that hang out at my local biker cafe and no-one mixes anymore. Think it's less the wavings an issue as the herd mentality of some people. I really respect guys like you, the ones who wave at everyone even if they're being a dick and trying to chat to all bikers, need more!!!
__________________
***Sorry, can you repeat that......Err what was that again***
Reply With Quote
  #94  
Old 21 Aug 2009
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Langholm,Scotland,UK.
Posts: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by twinkle star View Post
maybe if you chatted to them then they would stick with bikes too?? I have both. It's not aimed at you, rather the groups that hang out at my local biker cafe and no-one mixes anymore. Think it's less the wavings an issue as the herd mentality of some people. I really respect guys like you, the ones who wave at everyone even if they're being a dick and trying to chat to all bikers, need more!!!


I'll be down in your neck of the woods (Portsmouth) next week, (Tuesday 25th, catching the ferry to Santander) I'll be on a Azure blue Triumph Trophy and nodding and waving at all bikes!
My 2 pence worth, BMW GS riders are some of the worst for not acknowledging you.



Trophymick
Reply With Quote
  #95  
Old 21 Aug 2009
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: West Yorkshire UK
Posts: 1,196
Quote:
Originally Posted by trophymick View Post
My 2 pence worth, BMW GS riders are some of the worst for not acknowledging you.
Highly trained engineers in Munich have spent the last 90 years looking at handlebars. They have concluded that it is better to have at least two grips as this seems to be the average number of hands the vehicle operators have. (They don't talk about the indicator design boys, who have three thumbs due to coming from a very isolated village in the mountains where the winters are long and TV reception poor) . The BMW users manual therefore clearly states that the operator must have a hand on each grip and that failure to do so invalidates the warranty.

I actually read the manual that came with the Bonneville the other week (only had it six years!). It seems that adjusting the chain while the bike is running isn't a good idea. I mean, who'd have guessed.

Copied from another group:

YouTube - Bikers and Harleys

You can IMHO substitute just about any single make club for "Harley". Gave a smile which is unusual for US style stand up.

Andy
Reply With Quote
  #96  
Old 22 Aug 2009
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: portsmouth
Posts: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Threewheelbonnie View Post
Highly trained engineers in Munich have spent the last 90 years looking at handlebars. They have concluded that it is better to have at least two grips as this seems to be the average number of hands the vehicle operators have. (They don't talk about the indicator design boys, who have three thumbs due to coming from a very isolated village in the mountains where the winters are long and TV reception poor) . The BMW users manual therefore clearly states that the operator must have a hand on each grip and that failure to do so invalidates the warranty.

I actually read the manual that came with the Bonneville the other week (only had it six years!). It seems that adjusting the chain while the bike is running isn't a good idea. I mean, who'd have guessed.

Copied from another group:

YouTube - Bikers and Harleys

You can IMHO substitute just about any single make club for "Harley". Gave a smile which is unusual for US style stand up.

Andy

hee hee i frickin love you
xxxxxxxxxxxx
__________________
***Sorry, can you repeat that......Err what was that again***
Reply With Quote
  #97  
Old 22 Aug 2009
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Kent / Sussex border
Posts: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by trophymick View Post
My 2 pence worth, BMW GS riders are some of the worst for not acknowledging you.

Trophymick
I would just like to point out that as I ride a GS everyday and wave at anyone and everyone your theory is not completly accurate!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Threewheelbonnie
Highly trained engineers in Munich have spent the last 90 years looking at handlebars. They have concluded that it is better to have at least two grips as this seems to be the average number of hands the vehicle operators have. (They don't talk about the indicator design boys, who have three thumbs due to coming from a very isolated village in the mountains where the winters are long and TV reception poor) . The BMW users manual therefore clearly states that the operator must have a hand on each grip and that failure to do so invalidates the warranty.
My warranty was up ages ago so this no longer applies.
I do however love mountains but sadly don't have three thumbs as this could be a good way of getting free !

If your ever passing this way be sure to stop by and I will get my bike out, sit on it and wave to you, just to keep you happy!
Reply With Quote
  #98  
Old 23 Aug 2009
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Sunderland, UK
Posts: 281
Quote:
Originally Posted by twinkle star View Post
maybe if you chatted to them then they would stick with bikes too?? I have both. It's not aimed at you, rather the groups that hang out at my local biker cafe and no-one mixes anymore.
Maybe. I don't have a problem talking with CBT kids on bikes. Some have a genuine interest and you can tell if they'll take it further. It's the attitude of the chavs on uninsured wrecks that gets me. I'm sure everyone here has had a tracksuit wearing yoof on a 2 wheeled hairdryer trying to cut them up in traffic or baiting them into a "race".

I had an interesting discussion a while ago with a non-biker, who said riding bikes are just about making a statement to others. Any reason other than posing was totally lost on him. The reason I'm saying that is because, like it or not, the general public still see motorcycles as having an attitude and almost anti-social edge or stigma attached to them. In my opinion, that's what attracts kids to them. Look at the likes of Harley who are almost trying to sell a lifestyle, rather than a bike and the marketing which is aimed specifically at the financially well off, mid-life crisis, new rider.

On the subject of bike meets, I don't really bother with them now unless they're at the end of a really good ride out.
Reply With Quote
  #99  
Old 24 Aug 2009
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Sunderland, UK
Posts: 281
On a lighter note, I got talking to an old boy with a very tidy Yamaha Diversion/Watsonian Squire outfit this afternoon. He must have been in his late 70's/early 80's but we just got chatting about old bikes. Started showing me photo's of the Ariel Square Four outfit that he had in the 60's and how he'd passed his test on his boss's Vincent Black Shadow!!!.

I'm 32 and I ride sportsbikes mostly, despite them being overkill for our roads. However, I can't think of any other hobby, pastime, activity, call whatever you will, that would bring me and this guy into a conversation.
Keep waving
Reply With Quote
  #100  
Old 25 Aug 2009
MarkE's Avatar
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Oxford, UK
Posts: 89
I'm just invisible

I went out to play on Saturday and wondered if I had become invisible. Everything was fine for about three miles, weather nice, and improving, roads clear and the bike (a Pan as it goes Craig) was warming up nicely. I noticed a bike (Drag Star I think) pulled over and stopped to ask if he needed any help. Much to my relief he was just stretching his legs and didn't need help (I'm more than slightly cack handed, so I would probably have been little use to him, but I always stop). After wishing each other good days I carried on, but I must have become invisible

It was a nice day and the roads were full of bikes but none of them returned my wave; the classic riders, the sportsbike scratchers, the cruisers, the tourers (adventure and traditional), even another Pan ignored me. On the outward leg of my ride just two riders waved back; an old boy on an old and well used (ie not highly polished classic) Triumph, and a youngster (I'm guessing) on a 125 under L plates. The homeward leg was much better; visibility must have been restored over coffee & cake (you don't think I'm fading away and they couldn't see me until I'd eaten?).

Frankly however, I don't care if you ignore me - I'll continue waving as long as I'm even occasionally acknowledged, and I'll continue stopping even if I'm little help. I'm too old and too lazy to change the habits of a lifetime.
Reply With Quote
  #101  
Old 26 Aug 2009
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: West Yorkshire UK
Posts: 1,196
Time, weather and rant #2

The day and weather was your issue there. Get yourself into the peaks or dales on say New Years day and the proportion of guy's who'll wave back will be over 90%. If it's a nice day on Monday and you are on the approach roads to the Cat and Fiddle, it'll be closer to 10%.

As for stopping to help and mechanical ability, don't worry about it. A working mobile phone, a ride a few miles home to collect tools/spares, carrying a flat to somewhere with a working compressor, the loan of the right sized spanner, loan of a gallon of petrol; I consider myself half competant at fixing bikes but that's the usual help you end up giving if someone is stuck rather than stripping their gearbox (unless they are Ural owners).

Rant #2 ; a question to the BMW and Pan owners, what's all this playing a coppers thing (not that the vast majority do it)? There I was in the Repmobile on the M-62, it's ****ing down and I'm early, so it's lane 1 and 56 mph. In the mirrors I see a bike lit up like a Christmas tree, the rider in white helmet and lime green suit with badges on the fairing/tank/panniers. He's doing about 75 tailgating a car in lane 3. Until you got close enough to see the bike was a GS with a roll sack on the seat he looked like the Lego Plod. The green suit and lights I get, they make you show up, that's why the police wear them. The badges and checker style reflectors deliberatley meant to make him look like a copper had two effects in my mind. First of all, that car he was pushing wasn't going to go over 75 mph if it took him until the motorway ran out in Hull to get past the car in lane 2 and pull over. Fake plod matey wasn't going anywhere fast. Second, if the real coppers do him for speeding, they are going to throw in impersonating too, or at least ask about the mods and his insurance. That's big **** if they go to town. I've seen Pan's decked out this way too.

Anyone follow the logic of doing this? Some sort of buzz from having the cagers stare at you? I had a white F650. The odd car would get out of the way faster than on my red bike, but as I was wearing a red lid and black suit, if they thought I was official they needed their eyes testing. Really can't see the point in doing the whole fake thing.

Andy
Reply With Quote
  #102  
Old 26 Aug 2009
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: UK
Posts: 30
Hey Andy. Are you sure your impersonator wasn't a hospital courier. I see them all the time. I believe their mane purpose is to transport organs and blood. They usually ride Pans and GS bikes and have the green and white deco, but with ambulance service badges and the words 'blood' or 'organs' written somewhere.

just a thought.
Reply With Quote
  #103  
Old 26 Aug 2009
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: West Yorkshire UK
Posts: 1,196
Could have been, but the chequered details looked blue to me.

If he was a courier he needed to read Roadcraft again.

Andy
Reply With Quote
  #104  
Old 26 Aug 2009
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: UK
Posts: 30
Haha! Yeah blue and white is usually plod deco, green and white is ambulance services. Im now very tempted to paint my scrambler green and stick a few ammo boxes on the back, brimming with loose ammo and grenades, strap an M16 to my back and pretend im a army motorcycle courier!

or maybe paint it red with blue sirens and attach the garden hose to the back....the list is endless!
Reply With Quote
  #105  
Old 26 Aug 2009
Gold Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Wirral
Posts: 166
Like most others this thread has been amazing and illuminating. When i first started out in the early 70's with a bantam 175 and a 2nd hand greasy leather jacket, I was ignored by those on Commandos and Rocket Threes, even Tiger Cubs would only grudgingly acknowledge me. Scooters were a strict no no and one sure way of being beaten to death by a horde in parkas on lambrettas that could outrun me. As I got bigger and better bikes I got more smiles and waves and sense of being accepted. Things changed at the end of the 70’s with the Japscrap and Brit oilers encampments and you were either one or the other and never should the twain meet.
As the British bike industry imploded and every one rode around on Jap screamers or those things with lots of exhausts old rivalries passed away and as we were all on a Jap machine (the only ones you could buy then, early 80’s) every one waved or acknowledged each other with the exception of various chapters with colours. (these guys still do not wave as its uncool)
Today in 2009 I find that the encampment thing is alive and well although it no longer depends upon the make of bike but the type. I nod to everyone and stop at the first opportunity if a fellow biker is stopped at the roadside but find it is (in general) the big tourers, mainly BMs and Goldwings/Panams that ignore me. It is nice to hark back to a bygone age when we were all friendly and part of an exclusive club but the truth is it never was.
It is one of the reasons I love the HUBB. There is a sense of camaraderie here and everyone I have met so far, either at meets or camping has been great. I wish most of the rest of the biking community I have met over the years had been like the people I have met here so far.
__________________
www.frothandflames.com
2005 650 Transalp
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
biker's 'pardon' in porcarot (porcaro?) brittany? zenbiker Motorcycle Events around the world 6 4 Feb 2009 09:39
2 bikers in Almaty henri Northern Asia 1 27 Jun 2005 19:12
A question, then a rant This_is_it 4WD Overland Tech 27 17 Sep 2004 17:14
R80GS - rotating engine the wrong way. Steve Pickford BMW Tech 2 29 Jul 2003 13:58
Escorting bikers in Morroco Derek-Jan Travellers Seeking Travellers 0 24 Jul 2003 02:43

 
 


HU DVD Summer Special!

Now that summer is here, get On the Road! Take 30% off the Achievable Dream - On the Road! 2-DVD set until August 31 only. Get On the Road! Learn the tips to staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure!

Our veteran travellers share their tips (and great stories) for staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure.

"A fantastic, informative and inspirational DVD."

"It's brilliant - thank you very much!"

Check it out at the HU Store! Remember to use Coupon Code 'ONTHEROAD' on your order when you checkout.


Renedian Adventures

What others say about HU...

"I just wanted to say thanks for doing this and sharing so much with the rest of us." Dave, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the DVD series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring! The new look of the website is very impressive, updated and catchy. Thank you so very much!" Jennifer, Canada

"...Great site. Keep up the good work." Murray and Carmen, Australia

"We just finished a 7 month 22,000+ mile scouting trip from Alaska to the bottom of Chile and I can't tell you how many times we referred to your site for help. From how to adjust your valves, to where to stay in the back country of Peru. Horizons Unlimited was a key player in our success. Motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world are in debt to your services." Alaska Riders

contest pic

10th Annual HU Travellers Photo Contest is on now! This is an opportunity for YOU to show us your best photos and win prizes!

NEW! HU 2014 Adventure Travel T-shirts! are now available in several colors! Be the first kid on your block to have them! New lower prices on synths!

HU 2014 T-shirts now in!

Check out the new Gildan Performance cotton-feel t-shirt - 100% poly, feels like soft cotton!


What turns you on to motorcycle travel?


Global Rescue, WORLDwide evacuation services for EVERYONE

Global Rescue is the premier provider of medical, security and evacuation services worldwide and is the only company that will come to you, wherever you are, and evacuate you to your home hospital of choice. Additionally, Global Rescue places no restrictions on country of citizenship - all nationalities are eligible to sign-up!


New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80 G/S motorcycle.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events (22 this year!); we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, the HUBB or to receive the e-zine. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.


Books & DVDs

amazon

All the best travel books and videos listed and often reviewed on HU's famous Books page. Check it out and get great travel books from all over the world.


Motorcycle Express for shipping and insurance!

Motorcycle Express

MC Air Shipping, (uncrated) USA / Canada / Europe and other areas. Be sure to say "Horizons Unlimited" to get your $25 discount on Shipping!
Insurance - see: For foreigners traveling in US and Canada and for Americans and Canadians traveling in other countries, then mail it to MC Express and get your HU $15 discount!




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:13.