Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > All Miscellaneous questions > Travellers' questions that don't fit anywhere else

Travellers' questions that don't fit anywhere else This is an opportunity to ask any question, and post any notice you wish that doesn't fit into one of the other sections.
Contact Overland Solutions for all your custom modifications and setup for overland travel.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #31  
Old 8 Aug 2010
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: London, UK
Posts: 123
Using the rear brake

Thanks guys,

So far I've hardly been using my rear brake at all. As a newbie rider, I'm still trying to work out what the difference is between front and back brakes and the rules for using them, both singly and together.

Also I'm not sure if my rear brake pedal is currently in the best position for my foot, as at present my foot naturally rests just underneath it and sometimes gets caught when I go to use it...

I have a feeling that not using the rear brake was what contributed to my off on the steep downward slope the other day? I was using only the front brake to control my speed (I was going very slowly at that point) - should I maybe have been using the rear one for more control??

Definitely need to practise more rear brake action, as you guys say...
Jeanie
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 9 Aug 2010
steved1969's Avatar
Gold Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Yorkshire UK
Posts: 110
Absolutely you should, as Mickey stated, slow control is all about the rear brake (well, not all, but a heck of a lot).

Using the front brake causes the front forks to compress, which in turn changes the balance of the bike, making it harder to control at slow speeds. Then when you release the front brake the forks spring back up, causing more loss of balance.

When you are travelling at speed the front brake does most of the braking (used with a mixture of rear brake too), but slow speed control should be all about the rear brake.

A good technique to practice is to simply ride in a straight line as slow as possible, try and keep your engine revs constant, at a little over tickover, then use the rear brake to control your speed, slipping the clutch a little to avoid the engine stalling as required. With practice you should be able to ride comfortably at walking pace in a nice straight line.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 9 Aug 2010
oothef's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: york
Posts: 265
Pleased you've taken it on and come out top side, glad to be of help. Can't fault Mickey and steves advice, rear brake is best for slow control, and if you want to go really slow you have to slip the clutch whilst controlling the throttle, easy! The fact you've done what you've done tells me you'll soon have it sussed. If you're not confident/happy with what's happening, stop and re-assess, as Corporal Jones always said "Don't panic!" If you get in to riding fast I recommend stomping on the back brake a fraction before hitting the front whilst gritting teeth and buttocks, but it all comes with practice and experience. Keep on keeping on
You ought to look at your back brake, there's usually a bolt to adjust the position of the pedal + the brake rod adjustment so as you can get it in the best position (under your foot) so you can use it easily and automatically with minimal delay between thought and action, all controls should be set for easy (thoughtless) use.
__________________
Anything can happen in the next half hour

Last edited by oothef; 9 Aug 2010 at 01:35. Reason: English!
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 11 Aug 2010
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: London, UK
Posts: 123
Rear brake practise

Hey thanks for this rear brake enlightenment, guys!

I'm going to adjust the rear brake position on my bike this weekend and then do some practice somewhere quiet to practise low-speed braking as you suggest.

As a newbie rider, I'm finding generally that I'm ok when the bike's moving at speed; it's when I'm going slow that it all gets to be more of a challenge. I think so far I've been missing the help that a rear brake can give you at low speed, and have a feeling that using the rear brake a lot more will "unlock" my ability to control the bike when going more slowly. Also, I've been shying away from roads that involve hill stops/starts, as I think maybe I need to master the rear brake use in order to help with those too??

Jeanie
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 22 Nov 2010
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Whangarei, New Zealand
Posts: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeanied1 View Post
Hey guys,

So after getting my now-beloved Suzuki Marauder just over a week ago, I've been getting out on my local suburban roads as much as I can, to build up my riding skills and confidence. It's been going really well - yesterday I even braved a 30-minute ride in late-afternoon traffic, which did wonders for my confidence: I've been really feeling like I'm getting the hang of this!

BUT! Today, with the sun shining and a great afternoon for riding, I got out on the road on my bike and my brain just turned to mush! Everything was clunky and I was suddenly really conscious of everything I was doing. I was more hesitant at junctions and stuck to going round the block, as opposed to the bigger circuit of the suburbs I've been doing. Basically my brain was just completely not in gear (let alone the bike!). In the end, I just rode the bike back into the garage, dispirited that after progressing so well I was suddenly really crap again.

Is this normal?? Are there some days when it just doesn't come together in the brain department? Is this a newbie thing? Or do all motorcyclists have "off days" (I don't mean falling off the bike, psychologically "off"!). And is there anything you can do to overcome this mental block - or did I do the right thing by just giving up and coming home?

I'm quickly realising that motorcycling is 10 per cent operating the bike and 90 per cent a state of mind!! (feel free to dispute those figures, it's just a newbie's perspective...)

Jeanie
Hi Jeanie, I was so glad to read about your 'off days' . I try to explain this to my husband who has ridden for 30 years and he looks at me blankly ! I noticed you posted that comment in July 2010, may i ask how you are going now ? I rode in my teens and have just started again, about to go for my restricted license but had a real off day last weekend (having two harleys pass me at around 160 k's in a notorious black spot didn't help) I'm thinking i need a bit more time. Any advice you can offer ? I am absolutely loving riding again and want to eliminate these negative days!!! Jen.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 22 Nov 2010
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Aussie expat in Switzerland half way RTW
Posts: 614
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeanied1 View Post
or did I do the right thing by just giving up and coming home?

A lesser rider wouldn't have had the presence of mind to make the call to stop and call it a day.

This is extremely important and full credit to you for recognising this and stopping. Accidents happen when you are not fully concentrating on your riding and when emotions are clouding judgement.

Never fight the urge to stop, afterall it's not a race, motorcycling should be enjoyed.
__________________
TurboCharger + Francois (our BMW R1200gs) '07
www.riding2up.net, blog.riding2up.net
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 4 Dec 2010
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: London, UK
Posts: 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg&Jen View Post
Hi Jeanie, I was so glad to read about your 'off days' . I try to explain this to my husband who has ridden for 30 years and he looks at me blankly ! I noticed you posted that comment in July 2010, may i ask how you are going now ? I rode in my teens and have just started again, about to go for my restricted license but had a real off day last weekend (having two harleys pass me at around 160 k's in a notorious black spot didn't help) I'm thinking i need a bit more time. Any advice you can offer ? I am absolutely loving riding again and want to eliminate these negative days!!! Jen.
Hey Jen,

Thanks for your post! Don't worry about the "off days" - I've discovered that these can happen to even the most experienced of riders, it's all just a state of mind! Some days it all comes together, and then other days it seems like the world's a bit off-kilter and it's all a real effort, eh?!

I got my L-plates in July and next weekend - exactly 5 months on - I'll be taking my full test. My mantra as a newbie rider has been practise, practise, practise - the more time I spend on the bike, the more comfortable and competent I become (notwithstanding those blasted off days, of course!).

The main thing is, I LOVE riding and even though I would say it still doesn't come "naturally" at the moment (I have to concentrate really hard sometimes!), the good days of riding far, far outweigh the bad. And you're always learning from those mistakes and blips, so in the end it all adds up to you being a better all-round rider, I think. I've learnt not to dwell on things and get despondent - just get back on the bike and ride!

I really hope I pass my test next weekend, as a lot of it is just confidence - and that sure would be a confidence boost!

Meantime...practice, practice, and more practice for me before next Sunday !!

Jeanie
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 4 Dec 2010
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: West Yorkshire UK
Posts: 1,240
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeanied1 View Post
- I've discovered that these can happen to even the most experienced of riders, it's all just a state of mind!
Too right, 18 years riding from the North Cape to the Western Desert and a couple of weeks back I end up face down in a car park due to forgetting the disc lock (which I use every day) after work

Best of luck with the test, you know you can do it

Andy
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 1 Jan 2011
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Kent, UK
Posts: 8
I've not been riding long, maybe about 18 months, and have had this once or twice. There's seemingly no explanation, but I just told my riding buddy that my head wasn't in the right place and needed to go at a more sedate pace. I guess that we ride in all sorts of conditions and states of mind and knowing how your mind and body reacts in all of them is all part of the continuous learning process. I've since learnt that eating the right stuff at the right times before a long ride and staying hydrated make an enormous difference to being comfortable and alert on the bike.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Psychology of travel Mombassa Travellers' questions that don't fit anywhere else 21 21 Oct 2011 17:52
SeanF's RTW Planning Brain Dump: Route SeanF Route Planning 4 2 Aug 2010 16:21
SeanF's RTW Planning Brain Dump: Health SeanF Staying Healthy on the Road 4 10 Jul 2010 13:07
Anti-Malaria Medicine May Cause Brain Damage CraigT Staying Healthy on the Road 5 24 Jun 2004 00:53
Motorcycling in Austria Joachim Europe 0 25 Feb 2002 17:01

 
 
 

NEW! HU 2015 Motorcycle Adventure Travel Calendar is now available! Get your copy now for some terrific travel inspiration!

HUGE, 11.5 x 16.5 inches, beautifully printed in Germany on top quality stock! Photos are the winning images from over 600 entries in the 9th Annual HU Photo Contest!

Horizons Unlimited 2015 Motorcycle Adventure Travel Calendar.

"The calendar is magnificent!"

"I just wanted to say how much I'm loving the new, larger calendar!"

We share the profit with the winning photographers. YOU could be in the HU Calendar too - enter here!

Next HU Eventscalendar

See all events

 

HU DVD Autumn Special!

Take 40% off Road Heroes Part 1 until October 31 only!

Road Heroes features tales of adventure, joy and sheer terror by veteran travellers Peter and Kay Forwood (193 countries two-up on a Harley); Dr. Greg Frazier (5 times RTW); Tiffany Coates (RTW solo female); and Rene Cormier (University of Gravel Roads).

The first in an exciting new series, Road Heroes features tales of adventure, joy and sheer terror by veteran travellers."Inspiring and hilarious!"

"I loved watching this DVD!"

"Lots of amazing stories and even more amazing photographs, it's great fun and very inspirational."

"Wonderful entertainment!"

Check it out at the HU Store! Remember to use Coupon Code 'HEROES' on your order when you checkout.



Scottoiler automatic chain oilers. The most important accessory for your next motorcycle adventure!


Renedian Adventures


Renedian Adventures

What others say about HU...

"I just wanted to say thanks for doing this and sharing so much with the rest of us." Dave, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the DVD series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring! The new look of the website is very impressive, updated and catchy. Thank you so very much!" Jennifer, Canada

"...Great site. Keep up the good work." Murray and Carmen, Australia

"We just finished a 7 month 22,000+ mile scouting trip from Alaska to the bottom of Chile and I can't tell you how many times we referred to your site for help. From how to adjust your valves, to where to stay in the back country of Peru. Horizons Unlimited was a key player in our success. Motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world are in debt to your services." Alaska Riders

contest pic

10th Annual HU Travellers Photo Contest is on now! This is an opportunity for YOU to show us your best photos and win prizes!

NEW! HU 2014 Adventure Travel T-shirts! are now available in several colors! Be the first kid on your block to have them! New lower prices on synths!

HU 2014 T-shirts now in!

Check out the new Gildan Performance cotton-feel t-shirt - 100% poly, feels like soft cotton!


What turns you on to motorcycle travel?


Global Rescue, WORLDwide evacuation services for EVERYONE

Global Rescue is the premier provider of medical, security and evacuation services worldwide and is the only company that will come to you, wherever you are, and evacuate you to your home hospital of choice. Additionally, Global Rescue places no restrictions on country of citizenship - all nationalities are eligible to sign-up!


New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80 G/S motorcycle.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events (22 this year!); we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, the HUBB or to receive the e-zine. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.


Books & DVDs

amazon

All the best travel books and videos listed and often reviewed on HU's famous Books page. Check it out and get great travel books from all over the world.


Motorcycle Express for shipping and insurance!

Motorcycle Express

MC Air Shipping, (uncrated) USA / Canada / Europe and other areas. Be sure to say "Horizons Unlimited" to get your $25 discount on Shipping!
Insurance - see: For foreigners traveling in US and Canada and for Americans and Canadians traveling in other countries, then mail it to MC Express and get your HU $15 discount!




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 18:14.