Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > All Miscellaneous questions > Travellers' questions that don't fit anywhere else

Travellers' questions that don't fit anywhere else This is an opportunity to ask any question, and post any notice you wish that doesn't fit into one of the other sections.
Contact Overland Solutions for all your custom modifications and setup for overland travel.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #16  
Old 31 Jul 2010
oothef's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: york
Posts: 265
It's not just brain ache but physical tiredness, when it's all new you're more tense which has an effect on your abilities/endurance, three deep breaths often makes you aware of how tense you are.
__________________
Anything can happen in the next half hour
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 1 Aug 2010
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: London, UK
Posts: 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mickey D View Post
I'd highly recommend reading "The Pace" by a friend of mine, Nick Ienatsch.
I had the chance to ride with Nick and company back in the 90's when this style of group riding was being formed. Motorcyclist magazine frequently test new bikes in the Santa Monica mountains, my former back yard.

The Pace works, and you will be a better rider if you learn the basic tenants and put them to use ... daily. Not strictly for beginners but all the basic principles apply.
Check it out.

.: Nick Ientash's The Pace | Canyon Chasers Motorcycle Sport Touring :.
Hey thanks for this MickeyD, it's a great read!

I'm reading anything and everything I can get my hands on about how to be a good - and safe - motorcyclist, as I want to get into good habits from the very start.

I've had some great basic training (thanks again, Ride-Tek guys in Melbourne!). But the real skill is actually reading the road and other road users, which is a combination of intuition and concentration, I think. At the moment, in my case, it's all about the latter (hence the "brain ache" and fatigue!) - but hopefully the former will come, the more I'm on the road.

Meantime, reading up on the best techniques for riding is really galvanizing my on-road experience - a good rider is an informed rider, no question!

Jeanie
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 3 Aug 2010
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: London, UK
Posts: 123
Just had my first off :(

Well it was all going so well... and then I came off my bike coming back into my own garage!

To be fair, it was the "perfect storm" scenario for me to come off - a right-hand turn into a steep slope going down into my underground carpark. Just as I made the turn, there was a car coming up the slope the other way, leaving not much room between it and the wall to my right. As I tried not to hit the wall to my left or the oncoming car to my right, whilst going down the slope (and over a speed bump on the slope!), my brain overloaded, I lost control and fell sideways.

Luckily, I was going at such low speed, I wasn't hurt at all. Had a weird "slo- mo" moment as I fell, hinking "Wow, so this is what falling off a motorcycle really feels like!" Wasn't worried in the slightest about hurting myself!

Happily, a knight in shining armour helped me get the bike back up and down into the underground garage. Bad news is - the clutch housing has snapped in two, leaving the clutch lever dangling helplessly by the cables. I have no idea how this could have happened, as the bike fell to the right, not the left.

Not upset about coming off the bike. VERY upset about how I'm going to get the clutch fixed so I can carry on riding asap and not get hung up on this little incident...

Jeanie
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 3 Aug 2010
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: North Lakes - UK
Posts: 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeanied1 View Post
"Wow, so this is what falling off a motorcycle really feels like!" Wasn't worried in the slightest about hurting myself!
It's funny is that. Lots of people are afraid of falling off, and to some extent it's a good fear... but the reality is often different from what you imagine.

Road work is much more likely to result in injury, but slow speed stuff, where the bike isn't under any real power is the most likely place for a drop. It's the same in an of road situation, the fear of falling is worse than the fall itself - often, but not always, depends on lots of things.

They (the safety police) make a big thing about 'speed kills' but how many fighter pilots die just from going fast ? No speed is your friend, stopping quickly is the problem, its very difficult to fall or drop a bike at speed. Stopping quickly is the one to avoid!

Did you know that your body cannot survive a dead stop from anything over 30mph ? Your internal organs continue through your rib cage and into your shirt! A sobering thought when you are hurtling down the road, hence the previous advice, can you stop in the distance you can see to be clear?

Still we all have motorcycles for a reason, freedom. whoever you ask it pretty much comes down to some variation on freedom.

I hope you get your bike fixed, we learn from our mistakes, and you've picked up a lesson early on. Think about it, and how to avoid it in the future, practice practice practice, but most off all - enjoy.

Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 3 Aug 2010
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Chester, UK
Posts: 139
Not upset about coming off the bike. VERY upset about how I'm going to get the clutch fixed so I can carry on riding asap and not get hung up on this little incident...

Jeanie [/quote]

That's a good attitude. No need for it to put you off, learn from it and move on..

Can you remember what you actually did wrong? Did you grab the front brake too hard? Had you got your balance right on leaving the turn before the ramp? Should you have stopped after the turn to assess if the ramp was clear before progressing? In other words, was it a 'reading the road' or control of the bike mistake that led to you laying it down? Try to figure this out and then you can work on that aspect of your riding.

Sounds as if the slope of the ramp, the fact that you were coming out of a turn, the speed bump (and the oncoming car!!) contributed to affect your slow speed control. Think back to the slow speed control part of your lessons - I bet it was all done on flat ground. Adding road undulations really changes how the bike and your balance and traction points work, so maybe you could practice slow speed control on undulating ground?

I cant offer up any advice on how to fix the clutch, but I'd recommend you try fixing it yourself, or at least watching the person who does so that you learn a bit about repair work.

There's a real sense of achievement to be had from repairing stuff. Anyways, you're OK and that is the main thing!

PS. some folk recommend having all the bolts on handlebar mounting brackets a little looser than normal. This way brake cylinders/wing mirrors/levers etc have a chance to spin around the bars rather than snapping in the event of an off.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 3 Aug 2010
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: poole dorset
Posts: 152
If you can try to get off road, not extreme, just tracks and trails on a suitable bike you can learn a lot of bike control and gain a huge amount of confidence in your abilitys, it really does help with road riding.
We all have off days, that never changes no matter how many years in the saddle, although with time and experience they do become less.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 3 Aug 2010
steved1969's Avatar
Gold Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Yorkshire UK
Posts: 110
Jeanie, one advantage you have over a lot of people new to motorcycling is that you are obviously eager to learn, which will translate into you becoming a far better rider than the "I've passed and now I know everything there is to know about riding" brigade. Continue to practice, continue to ask questions and continue to learn and you will be laughing.

One thing that may be worth while is trying to get hold of a book called 'Motorcycle Roadcraft: The Police Rider's Handbook to Better Motorcycling'. This is the system that forms the basis of Police Riders skills over here in the UK, and I can't think of a better system to try and emulate than this one, it really does show how a motorcycle should be ridden, explaining what riders should be thinking about to ride safely and what they should be aware of and so much more. It's this that forms the basis of what GasUp posted about back on page 1 of this thread.

Thinking about your riding, trying to implement the skills from the Roadcraft book and practicing the basics of bike control are about the best things that anyone can do to improve their riding. Even now after having first ridden over 20 years ago I still take time out (especially with a new to me bike) to practice the 'learner skills' of slow control on a nice empty car park.

DOH! Just realised as I skimmed through the rest of this thread, Gasup actually mentioned the book in his post, so at least half of this post was rather pointless! In my defence I am suffering from Man Flu* today though!



*or maybe just a sniffle, or then again it could be swine flu, it's just hard to tell
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 4 Aug 2010
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: London, UK
Posts: 123
No bike for three weeks...

Thanks guys - as ever, your advice is gratefully received!

Stevied1969, I will definitely try and seek out that police riding book. Sounds like it will be really useful.

Meantime, the good news is I found the part needed to fix the clutch on my Marauder (handlebar clutch lever mount was broken in two!). Bad news is - it won't arrive for another two and half weeks!! Good news is I got the part at a discount price AND found a new buddy who will help me fix it to the bike for free!! Bad news is, no bike to ride for the next three weeks....

So what do motorcyclists do when their motorcycles are out of action?? Suddenly I'm staring down the barrel of the next two weekends not being able to go out riding... :

Jeanie
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 4 Aug 2010
oothef's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: york
Posts: 265
Do you not have any bike-breakers (apart from yourself!) anywhere near by? You don't always need the exact part, especially with things like controls, a lever assembly from another bike/model may get you going.
A start for your "spares carried" list
When refitting, slide a washer in the slot that clamps the perch to the bars, then you can tighten the clamping bolt tight and the lever should be able to move on the bars if pushed/crashed on. You don't want it too slack, just so it moves instead of breaking if banged.
Study why/how it happened and what you'd do differently next time
__________________
Anything can happen in the next half hour
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 4 Aug 2010
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: West Yorkshire UK
Posts: 1,240
Sorry about your off and glad to hear you are OK.

While you are bikeless, get some reading in. The service manual for your bike, anything you can get on general bike stuff like a carb manual, try a bit of Ted Simon or the AMHB (dangerous, leads to wanting to go places). Design yourself a rear carrier of something. Clean the bike and do any bits that need doing like dropping the oil.

Having had a job where I was away from anything with two/three wheels for weeks at a time I can understand this is frustrating, but there are ways to feed the habit.

Oh, and go see all those friends, relatives that usually complain you'd rather be out riding than popping in to drink tea etc. Never hurts me to take the wife shopping while the bikes U/S

Andy
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 4 Aug 2010
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Chester, UK
Posts: 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeanied1 View Post
So what do motorcyclists do when their motorcycles are out of action??
Get drunk and smoke
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 8 Aug 2010
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: London, UK
Posts: 123
Back on the road!

Hey guys,

Just wanted to say a heap of thank yous to you all, because I'm back on the road, yeeha!

oothef - brilliant advice about sourcing the part from a bike breakers - that's exactly what I did and I found the exact part I needed straight away!

garmei - thanks for recommending I fix the bike myself. I wasn't sure I could, but after a few long hours in the garage getting mucky with a toolkit, I did it!!

Just back from a Sunday morning ride and the clutch lever is absolutely fine. I would have had to wait another 2 weeks for the part from Suzuki if I hadn't done this.

Also had to face my "nemesis" - the scene of my "off". Kept my cool, and tackled the steep slope down into my garage completely under control this time. Admittedly there was nothing coming the other way - that would be the true test! - but my confidence is back up again, which is no bad thing!

Love the fact that the thought of being without my bike for 3 weeks spurred me into drastic action - and it#s paid off, yahoo!

Jeanie
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 8 Aug 2010
Mickey D's Avatar
Moderated Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: California
Posts: 514
Practice using the rear brake. Learn to lightly drag it in slow speed situations, use it very gently and learn the lock up point. Use it when doing tight circles and U turns. Stay OFF front brake. Lightly dragging rear brake allows very precise control of the bike and makes it easier to turn it tight.

At high speed, entering a corner, light application of the rear brake will reduce front end dive, settle the bike on its suspension and aid in slowing.
This especially good in wet or slippery conditions.

So many riders are not artful with the rear brake, don't really understand its importance. Learn this early on. You should be wearing out your rear brake pads long before the front ones.

Vision:
Where you LOOK is key. You Will Go Where you Look. Look up and through the corner. Or look to the gap ... not at the approaching car, tree, post or ditch. Practice and remind yourself of this every day.

Breath.
Don't hold your breath. Breath deep. Relax. Ride aware. Scan back and forth constantly. Ride Scared (Nick Ienatsch)
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 8 Aug 2010
steved1969's Avatar
Gold Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Yorkshire UK
Posts: 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mickey D View Post
Practice using the rear brake. Learn to lightly drag it in slow speed situations, use it very gently and learn the lock up point. Use it when doing tight circles and U turns. Stay OFF front brake. Lightly dragging rear brake allows very precise control of the bike and makes it easier to turn it tight.
Couldn't agree more, absolutely 100% you should be doing this.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mickey D View Post
At high speed, entering a corner, light application of the rear brake will reduce front end dive, settle the bike on its suspension and aid in slowing.
This especially good in wet or slippery conditions.
Couldn't agree less (sorry Mickey). Far better to get all your breaking done nice and early so you aren't touching the brakes at any point in a corner, especially not when entering one, turn in and then gently accelerate through the bend. Trailing the rear brake at turn in is OK if you are on a track (or off road) but that's purely to load up the front end for maximum grip as you turn in, on the road there is just no need for it.

That said if I miss understood and you just mean using the rear brake with the front while slowing down ready to enter the corner (while still travelling straight) then I 100% agree
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 8 Aug 2010
Mickey D's Avatar
Moderated Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: California
Posts: 514
Quote:
Originally Posted by steved1969 View Post
That said if I miss understood and you just mean using the rear brake with the front while slowing down ready to enter the corner (while still travelling straight) then I 100% agree
What I'm suggesting is that when you brake for a corner, by using the rear brake lightly it means less front end dive. Front braking should be done in two stages, once gently to get the bike settled down, then again, harder.

The rear brake .... used carefully and gently ... helps reduce dive and aids in braking. Once you turn in, no brakes at all.

I'm not suggesting a novice trail brake through the Apex, but sometimes just a hint of rear brake coming up out of the corner can smooth throttle snatch as you transition back on the power. But this is a more advanced technique.

Also, consider riding down a VERY steep downhill Hairpin turn. (come to California to see lots of these types of roads) Like 200 degree type. Here, a bit of rear brake helps get the bike turned more easily. I'm talking at speeds in the 15 mph to 20 mph range on a 9% slope. I generally drag both brakes gently but with very little front brake through the corner.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Psychology of travel Mombassa Travellers' questions that don't fit anywhere else 21 21 Oct 2011 17:52
SeanF's RTW Planning Brain Dump: Route SeanF Route Planning 4 2 Aug 2010 16:21
SeanF's RTW Planning Brain Dump: Health SeanF Staying Healthy on the Road 4 10 Jul 2010 13:07
Anti-Malaria Medicine May Cause Brain Damage CraigT Staying Healthy on the Road 5 24 Jun 2004 00:53
Motorcycling in Austria Joachim Europe 0 25 Feb 2002 17:01

 
 
 

NEW! HU 2015 Motorcycle Adventure Travel Calendar is now available! Get your copy now for some terrific travel inspiration!

HUGE, 11.5 x 16.5 inches, beautifully printed in Germany on top quality stock! Photos are the winning images from over 600 entries in the 9th Annual HU Photo Contest!

Horizons Unlimited 2015 Motorcycle Adventure Travel Calendar.

"The calendar is magnificent!"

"I just wanted to say how much I'm loving the new, larger calendar!"

We share the profit with the winning photographers. YOU could be in the HU Calendar too - enter here!

Next HU Eventscalendar

See all events

 

HU DVD Autumn Special!

Take 40% off Road Heroes Part 1 until October 31 only!

Road Heroes features tales of adventure, joy and sheer terror by veteran travellers Peter and Kay Forwood (193 countries two-up on a Harley); Dr. Greg Frazier (5 times RTW); Tiffany Coates (RTW solo female); and Rene Cormier (University of Gravel Roads).

The first in an exciting new series, Road Heroes features tales of adventure, joy and sheer terror by veteran travellers."Inspiring and hilarious!"

"I loved watching this DVD!"

"Lots of amazing stories and even more amazing photographs, it's great fun and very inspirational."

"Wonderful entertainment!"

Check it out at the HU Store! Remember to use Coupon Code 'HEROES' on your order when you checkout.



Scottoiler automatic chain oilers. The most important accessory for your next motorcycle adventure!


Renedian Adventures


Renedian Adventures

What others say about HU...

"I just wanted to say thanks for doing this and sharing so much with the rest of us." Dave, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the DVD series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring! The new look of the website is very impressive, updated and catchy. Thank you so very much!" Jennifer, Canada

"...Great site. Keep up the good work." Murray and Carmen, Australia

"We just finished a 7 month 22,000+ mile scouting trip from Alaska to the bottom of Chile and I can't tell you how many times we referred to your site for help. From how to adjust your valves, to where to stay in the back country of Peru. Horizons Unlimited was a key player in our success. Motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world are in debt to your services." Alaska Riders

contest pic

10th Annual HU Travellers Photo Contest is on now! This is an opportunity for YOU to show us your best photos and win prizes!

NEW! HU 2014 Adventure Travel T-shirts! are now available in several colors! Be the first kid on your block to have them! New lower prices on synths!

HU 2014 T-shirts now in!

Check out the new Gildan Performance cotton-feel t-shirt - 100% poly, feels like soft cotton!


What turns you on to motorcycle travel?


Global Rescue, WORLDwide evacuation services for EVERYONE

Global Rescue is the premier provider of medical, security and evacuation services worldwide and is the only company that will come to you, wherever you are, and evacuate you to your home hospital of choice. Additionally, Global Rescue places no restrictions on country of citizenship - all nationalities are eligible to sign-up!


New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80 G/S motorcycle.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events (22 this year!); we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, the HUBB or to receive the e-zine. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.


Books & DVDs

amazon

All the best travel books and videos listed and often reviewed on HU's famous Books page. Check it out and get great travel books from all over the world.


Motorcycle Express for shipping and insurance!

Motorcycle Express

MC Air Shipping, (uncrated) USA / Canada / Europe and other areas. Be sure to say "Horizons Unlimited" to get your $25 discount on Shipping!
Insurance - see: For foreigners traveling in US and Canada and for Americans and Canadians traveling in other countries, then mail it to MC Express and get your HU $15 discount!




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 14:59.