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Travellers' questions that don't fit anywhere else This is an opportunity to ask any question, and post any notice you wish that doesn't fit into one of the other sections.
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  #1  
Old 20 Feb 2007
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Mounting

This might be another random question, but how do people get on their bikes when loaded up!?

I have a CCM 404 which has a fairly high seat height. Swinging a leg over is normally fine, but at the weekend I loaded the bike up and went and tested all my new gear. With luggage on the back, I had to 'step' stright over the bike rather than swinging my leg around (as the luggage was now smugly sitting there watching me struggle). This resulted in a muddy seat as I scraped my boots on it. I also nearly dropped the bike once, and that was on a smooth flat surface. Luckily there were no overstrained muscle groups...however that is also a hazard I would be keen to avoid.

My question is, therefore, what is the trick to getting on? Has anyone got any clever tips to this simple question or do I just need to stretch before mounting?

Cheers,

Chris
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  #2  
Old 20 Feb 2007
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get on your bike like you would a horse...so for example if your side stand is on the left (not that horses have side stands):
standing on the left side of the bike, stand on your left footpeg with your left leg and then swing your right leg over all in one easy move...don.t fall of the other side.
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  #3  
Old 20 Feb 2007
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I can't think of an easier way...I figured looking like a goose was mandatory. I've scuffed two seats to death scraping a boot across as I do the big goose-step mount. Gets tougher as the day gets on and you get more tired.

I have the added pleasure of the hold-the-airhawk-pad-forward-as-you-do-the-goosestep dance. Followed by the stand-on-the-pegs-and-adjust-the-pad-on-the-move dance.

There's gotta be a better way. mini pogo stick? fold-back ladder? rocket boots? bungee A-frame? Maybe we need to develop a sidesaddle bike.

Brett
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  #4  
Old 21 Feb 2007
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Leave the kickstand down or center stand down as you get on. The kickstand you can put back up... the center stand you can just ride off of.
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  #5  
Old 21 Feb 2007
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Thumbs up

To help my stiff old leg over (!) I grab the cuff of my trousers to help the leg swing over. But I scuff seats too, more at the end of the day. I use the sidestand too.
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  #6  
Old 21 Feb 2007
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So this is what motorcycle adventurers discuss in their spare time.
What about getting off?
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  #7  
Old 21 Feb 2007
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same getting off the bike.

Basic.

Last edited by mollydog; 26 Mar 2009 at 02:49.
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  #8  
Old 21 Feb 2007
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The real answer is to buy a bike you can flat foot both feet on anything taller is too big. If we all did this the manufacturers would soon start producing bikes where ergonomics outweighed sales points. Most bikes are high because it is cheaper to share the oil and put all the bits inside one case that is wet sumped. A dry sump would allow the bikes to be around 3 inches ( 75mm) lower, just like they used to be. An added bonus is they would have a lower centre of gravity.
I usually use the centrestand, so mount it whilst it is on the stand, It is a lot easier without anything on the back. Fortunately for me I have studied martial arts since childhood and was taught by my father for as long as I can remember.
These days though at 63+ it is getting more difficult, as no centre stand to help when I stop and is not so easy to swing the leg over bags and tent whilst holding the bike and being stiff after a long ride.
stepping through on my bmw is bit on the limit for me, as I only 5ft 9" and cant reach the ground on my quarter ton monster.
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Old 22 Feb 2007
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Some very sensible points here, oldb, but remember for example that the AT was designed high for all that fasty, quicky, deserty business. The height did have a real purpose.....though they could have dropped it a few millimetres for non Dakar riders....

With your martial arts skills though, you could just karate chop the bugger if you fell off it ....you could force it to kneel like a camel under threat of violence....

Last edited by Caminando; 23 Feb 2007 at 08:56.
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Old 22 Feb 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caminando View Post

With your martial arts skills though, you could just katate chop the bugger if you fell off it

Fall off ??????


....you could force it to kneel like a camel under threat of violence....
Now that is a super idea, perhaps we could get the designers of these monstrosities to install suspension from Citroen, then we could lower them to get on and off.
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Old 22 Feb 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldbmw View Post
Most bikes are high because it is cheaper to share the oil and put all the bits inside one case that is wet sumped. A dry sump would allow the bikes to be around 3 inches ( 75mm) lower, just like they used to be.
I think you might find that the DRZ400 sorry no the CCM 404 is actually a dry sump engine and gearbox already
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  #12  
Old 23 Feb 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian E View Post
I think you might find that the DRZ400 sorry no the CCM 404 is actually a dry sump engine and gearbox already
maybe so, there are a few about, but most are not
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