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  #46  
Old 11 May 2007
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Unfortunately, it would involve starting over. Being an attorney means keeping clients. If I lose those clients now, I will have to spend years trying to get them back if I tried again. Obviously, I could try a different career (and that is very tempting), but I won't make nearly the same $.

There's always the option of going in-house as counsel when you get back, or going into the business side and still using your law skills ... law is a skill that gives you quite a bit of flexibility outside of just "being a lawyer". But you're right, it's the old golden handcuff problem! Good luck with your decision.
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  #47  
Old 11 May 2007
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Giving up work? Where do I sign that contract?!!!!
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  #48  
Old 14 May 2007
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Originally Posted by travelfor4 View Post
There's always the option of going in-house as counsel when you get back, or going into the business side and still using your law skills ... law is a skill that gives you quite a bit of flexibility outside of just "being a lawyer". But you're right, it's the old golden handcuff problem! Good luck with your decision.
I know it is a tough one. That is why I was wondering what others would do if they made that kind of money.
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  #49  
Old 18 May 2007
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Man, If I was a lawyer I wouldn't hesitate. I always assumed that you guys can pick up jobs like that (I'm flicking my fingers now). Or am I mistaken, or you might not want to work for someone else. The more money I make the easier it becomes, and the quicker I feel like packing my bags.

my 2 cents

I'm currently 30 (hitting me hard right now) and work in Engineering (Civil). I'm currently working for my 12th company and this company (where I've just handed in my notice yesterday) is my first permanent job. I've been mostly doing CAD because I didn't have any drive towards a better position because I was always to busy planning my next trip. I think I've been on 7 now with one a big bike trip. This has taken me 9-10 years to organise/ fund, and I've managed to find a wife in all this time who's gotten into it.

I tried a working holiday in Oz when I left Uni and got hooked to living out of a bag not worrying about the rat race immediately. Seeing my dad losing his health over his career might have something to do with that, but in the end of the day I've moved into design and am earning the same as my peers. Same for my wife (although she's travelled less) as she has now made principle.
She's also given up her job. We're moving back to Europe to save enough money for another trip at the end of next year. We'll need to save 55k Aussie, and are confident we'll manage. I used to pack my bags when my account reached 3k GBP. Then I worked out how much I owed Visa when I got back.
She's pretty much guarenteed a job anywhere as she's a traffic engineer, and probably won't loose out on pay or position. I'm more design related. Problem with me is that it all depends on which software you design with. Luckily it's growing but certainly not market leading. So I'll always face the choice of having to take a drafty role over a design/ creative role. Easy choice for me. I realise it becomes a juggle when kids are involved. That's why we won't have any. And it also depends on what you do for a living. There have been a rare case where I had to work cleaning hotels for a while (few weeks running out of money on a trip), but you got to do what you got to do.
The way I see it is, I live now. Who knows what'll happen at the back end.

Last edited by tmotten; 18 May 2007 at 04:45.
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  #50  
Old 18 May 2007
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All that babbling made me forget what I really wanted to say.

It's the notion that is leaving something forever. You'd be lucky (in some cases) if that happens. But usually we slot right back in where we left. We've come back to some companies, and because time goes so fast in an office, it's like you never left.
The longest I've ever made a trip last was 9 months. Got pretty sick of it all at the end so returned and went again after I got sick of working.
Most people I've worked with don't stay in one for for more then a few years anyway.
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  #51  
Old 18 May 2007
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One thing I've noticed

I got by on £2k a year as a student (and had a great time) and get by on my current salary of £xxk a year. My overdraft and overspend is about the same.

I think when we come back I will be back nearer the £2k a year. But at a guess that is when I will learn to shop in Kwik Save for my beans rather than Waitrose.

I think what I'm trying to say is every salary I have ever had is not quite enough, because a) I waste a lot and b) aspirations increase

Change those two and you can surely take several steps back. I hope anyway ....

I think maybe the first thing you have to do is realise that if you are in any sort of carear salary then you are probably way overspending to what you really need. And you are going to have to think - Can I give it up? If you can then it's going to be easy from there .......

Obviously taking sensible precations before you go is going to mean you have to take less steps back ...
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  #52  
Old 18 May 2007
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Originally Posted by EarlIV View Post
I know it is a tough one. That is why I was wondering what others would do if they made that kind of money.
Well, speaking only from personal experience as another lawyer, i'm putting off the travel long enough to build up the retirement nest egg, and get the kids to an age where they can appreciate longer travel. For the time being, we do lots of short (2 weekish) trips to get them hooked on the idea (kids are fighting over whether to go to china or egypt next :-)), then we're planning to pack the family and head off in a year and a half or so (when we're mid-40s) for a 2 year wander (though by 4x4, not bike). I figure that I can either come back to what I'm doing now, or go in house, or switch professions entirely (e.g. teach in africa or something) - it may not make as much, but I'm pretty sure I can find *something* that will pay the rent.

Besides, from what you've said, you've built up a practice pretty fast, and pretty well. If you're able to do that as young as you are, then it's a pretty good bet that you'd be able to build something again if you wanted to, when you get back. So if I were you, I'd save enough to have (i) money for the road, and (ii) a bit of a cushion for when you get back, and then i'd hit the road!
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  #53  
Old 22 May 2007
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Originally Posted by CornishDeity View Post

I think maybe the first thing you have to do is realise that if you are in any sort of carear salary then you are probably way overspending to what you really need. ...
Actually, we don't. My wife and I have always lived well below our means. We are much more about saving.
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  #54  
Old 11 Jul 2007
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Originally Posted by EarlIV View Post
Unfortunately, it would involve starting over. Being an attorney means keeping clients. If I lose those clients now, I will have to spend years trying to get them back if I tried again. Obviously, I could try a different career (and that is very tempting), but I won't make nearly the same $.
When the Roman Emperor Nero took power , his civil servants said to him, "What shall we do first?" . Nero replied, "First, let's kill all the lawyers!".

Sorry!
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  #55  
Old 11 Jul 2007
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Amazing Adapting

I'm always amazed when I am thrown into or I throw myself into new challenging/scary/bizarre/crazy situations, how quickly you adapt.

I am very lucky at the moment to have a job in London that is paying me a lot of money (as a result of some good experience and also cheekily asking for a raise that I never imagined gettting, and getting it).

I am due to leave for Australia in a couple of weeks time (eek!) and the trip, which is really more of a move to a new country than a holiday, is slowly mentally mutating into something that feels more like a holiday for the rest of my life. As I will be turning 30 soon after getting there (EEK!), clearly I won't be in a position to never have to work again (damn DAMN).

I will definitely miss the nice big chunky weekly income - going from a lot to nothing is fairly scary - but it depends on your motivations and your goals as to just how scary that is, and just how concerned you are about trying to ensure that you will be in a position to earn that big salary again (after reality sets in and the holiday is over). But then, it's a question of which reality you want to set in

I am very happy with the reality of being a bum for a while, living carefully off some savings and relishing not having to work again and chase that big digit salary.

Accumulate as much good work experience as you can before you leave on a trip, and see if you can line up some future contacts for your return, if you are hoping to slot right back in.

But who knows, travelling might (hopefully) change a few perspectives and priorities. Whose to say that you don't return and set up something of your own, or start in an exciting unexpected direction

It's always a shock to be back amongst crazy society after being away. You can limit the detrimental impact, but it really depends on your own priorities.

Man, I'm rambling. Sorry.

Just think of the really great experience that you will gain by having to dig deep when you get back and build up a client base. Easy is boring anyway! A bit of grit and determination never hurt anyone.

Worrying about something in the future means that you aren't focussing that energy on the now, and on the exciting adventure that you could be due to have. There is only so much planning that you can do for your hypothetical return. By the sounds of things you have the skill, the experience and the brain cells to be absolutely fine when you get back.

Bon voyage!
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  #56  
Old 20 Jul 2007
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Originally Posted by Shells View Post
I'm always amazed when I am thrown into or I throw myself into new challenging/scary/bizarre/crazy situations, how quickly you adapt.

I am very lucky at the moment to have a job in London that is paying me a lot of money (as a result of some good experience and also cheekily asking for a raise that I never imagined gettting, and getting it).

I am due to leave for Australia in a couple of weeks time (eek!) and the trip, which is really more of a move to a new country than a holiday, is slowly mentally mutating into something that feels more like a holiday for the rest of my life. As I will be turning 30 soon after getting there (EEK!), clearly I won't be in a position to never have to work again (damn DAMN).

I will definitely miss the nice big chunky weekly income - going from a lot to nothing is fairly scary - but it depends on your motivations and your goals as to just how scary that is, and just how concerned you are about trying to ensure that you will be in a position to earn that big salary again (after reality sets in and the holiday is over). But then, it's a question of which reality you want to set in

I am very happy with the reality of being a bum for a while, living carefully off some savings and relishing not having to work again and chase that big digit salary.

Accumulate as much good work experience as you can before you leave on a trip, and see if you can line up some future contacts for your return, if you are hoping to slot right back in.

But who knows, travelling might (hopefully) change a few perspectives and priorities. Whose to say that you don't return and set up something of your own, or start in an exciting unexpected direction

It's always a shock to be back amongst crazy society after being away. You can limit the detrimental impact, but it really depends on your own priorities.

Man, I'm rambling. Sorry.

Just think of the really great experience that you will gain by having to dig deep when you get back and build up a client base. Easy is boring anyway! A bit of grit and determination never hurt anyone.

Worrying about something in the future means that you aren't focussing that energy on the now, and on the exciting adventure that you could be due to have. There is only so much planning that you can do for your hypothetical return. By the sounds of things you have the skill, the experience and the brain cells to be absolutely fine when you get back.

Bon voyage!
I certainly think the challenge on returning would be half of the fun. It is really more of an issue for me of two things: (1) my responsibilities to my wife and kids; and (2) how much do you save now to try and make that holiday last and last.
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  #57  
Old 4 Aug 2007
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Concerns understandable

I haven't read the whole thread (ok, so sue me ) so I don't know if familly is a concern to you or your concern revolves mostly about the financial part.

But lets assume that family is not the problem. It's the issue of giving up a secure job. Perhaps it even pays well? You have a bunch of good friends outside of work as well as on the inside. Maybe your job situation even has the promise of a not too distant promotion possebillity? Maybe your life is just heading in a good direction and you are starting to feel content. Maybe this is in fact what's allowing your mind to even contemplate a RTW? Something a troublefilled life is less like to allow (at least that's my theory).

I am personally in the rather priviledged situation to be able to take an extended leave of absence from my place of work. 6 months. In my oppinion not long enough to do an actuall RTW but on the other hand too long to be called a vacation in the general sense. I am also priviledged to own a house that I through blind luck purchased at exactly the right time. Now, 8 years later, the value of this house has more than doubled and I am able to liqudate some of this into actuall cash. Don't ask me to explain it, because money matters was/is never my strong side. Suffice it to say that this action finances my 6 month trip across Africa including the purchase of a brand new Yamaha XT660. I do still have my Cagiva Elephant 900, but judged it too heavy and beaten up for a trip such as this. The last few months of mechanic bills on the old gal has left me apprehensive about taking it too far from my house .

Aaaaanyway....as you can propably see, I am one of the very fortunate people who is able to make the decision on a whim. No financial problems (at least not big ones), no family ties, friends aren't going anywhere, and a job that's waiting for me upon my return. I do recognize how much more fortunate I am, compared to those who actually saved up for literally years to do it, living on oatmeal and working through their vacations. Ok, I'm exagerating I know...but you get the idea. I tip my hat to those who have shown the dicipline to do it.

For me, what it all boiled down to in the end was the reasons why I wanted to do it. The accomplishment, the adventure, the "reving down" from life for a bit, or just pure boredom? I'd say a little bit of everthing. Allthough the adventure part propably takes the largest chunk. When I was a boy, my familly lived in Botswana for two years. I've always known that at some point in my life I would come back. As a tourist, mind you. How the mindtrail from a vacation in Francistown, to a cross-africa trip on a motorcycle came to be, I'm having a hard time to explain myself.

Sorry for rambling. I tend to do that.

Let me end by saying this; Allthough I am not a devout christian/catholic/hindu/muslim whatever, I do have a religous bent in me. I do believe that there are certain paths that are meant to be trodden. Kind of like being given a hand of cards upon your birth, and you play them as well as you can. By doing this trip, I feel like I'm stealing a few extra cards from the deck, when God is not looking. And to be honest, I don't think he minds all that much.
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  #58  
Old 7 Aug 2007
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How long do I postpone?

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Originally Posted by EarlIV View Post
That is really the essence of my question. You can see from my post that I make quite a bit. It has taken me a good ten years to get this far. I know right now I could quit and live comfortably for a few years, but at the end of it, I would have to go back to work making about 1/5 of what I am making now.

So the issue is: how long do I try and make this kind of good money?
Not being flippant but it's like holding off buying a car, bike or flash TV. If I don't do it now, next year it'll be cheaper and I could get an upgrade for the same price. It's exactly what we all do when we postpone making a big decision in our lives.

The question really is how much do you want it? Do you want to jack in your job when you're frayed at the edges and close to breakdown? Make decisions when you can - before they are made for you - Life has a way of flipping every situation on its head...

I think I know where you're coming from...I'm 32 and have spent 6 years forging a career and have come from Chief Shit-Shoveller to hitting the glass ceiling. My salary has gone up alot over that period and I could sit here and pick up that payslip every month for the next few years.

However, against the advice of my peers and family, I'm planning to quit next summer and go with my g/f from Mexico to Argentina over 4-6 months. She's worked 6 days a week for 10 years in London and raised a kid (now 20 ) and basically needs a break before she goes crazy!

I reckon that money will always be a lure, and the more you have, the more you need to accumulate. As the Persians would say: how many mouthfuls can you eat at a time?

If you've climbed the ladder and built a business empire it can be replicated again. Pick a date and stick to it! And...kick my arse if I haven't disappeared in a blast of smoke next summer

MS

Last edited by Marblestake; 7 Aug 2007 at 16:34.
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  #59  
Old 7 Aug 2007
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Exclamation The Other End Of The Spectrum

I hear talk of lawyers and people with mortgages who (comparitvley) earn decidedly more than my friends and I who are currently saving for a RTW trip HOPEFULLY in 2009.

Our salaries combined (3) probably equate to half that of the average lawyer/solicitor

Despite that - We are saving with what little pittens we have - We'll sell our sportsbikes closer the time and probably finance the trip via Loans, kidneys and other non-essential body parts. The jobs we have (all the same company) are not "long term" by any means, but they are a regular income and provide a little stability in the run-up to the RTW trip.

I personally have sold everything I do not require: TV, Computer (not this one!) and anything else I don't need. I've moved in with my parents to cut down on costs and sold my car - If you want it: you'll find a way!

Finding a job on your return is something I know plenty about (move to Ireland to look after ill Grandparents) I came back and found a job within three days. However, in highy qualified roles I can imagine the difficulty.

I refer to work as: Something you do for 40hrs a week to kill time before you leave, however the money has it's uses.

**ramble over**
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  #60  
Old 7 Aug 2007
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"Pick a date and stick to it! And...kick my arse if I haven't disappeared in a blast of smoke next summer."

Someone here will, that's for certain! And if girfriend bales, go anyway!

"Make decisions when you can - before they are made for you -"

Sometimes when there's that quandry, you have to wait till all the pieces fall into place and only THEN will the decision happen naturally, and not forced. Those forced decisions made out of panic/desperation are sometimes the once that kick back at you....oooooohhmmmmm.
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