Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > All Miscellaneous questions > Travellers' questions that don't fit anywhere else

Travellers' questions that don't fit anywhere else This is an opportunity to ask any question, and post any notice you wish that doesn't fit into one of the other sections.
Contact Overland Solutions for all your custom modifications and setup for overland travel.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 7 Jan 2012
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 10
Border "no mans land"

Does anybody know what might happen or have any experience where you leave a country for which you had only a single entry visa and where visas can't be acquired at the border only to be refused entry at the next country leaving you stranded between the two borders.

For all of my years travelling I've never heard of it happenng or encountered it myself, but as I look at some trips where I'll chance getting into one or two countries that I should but won't have a carnet for, it seems worth asking about.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 7 Jan 2012
Tiffany's Avatar
Gold Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: Lands End, Cornwall, UK
Posts: 579
Arrow

Hi Stevo
In my experience, the guards at the border post of the country you are leaving will usually check your passport before they allow you into no-man's land, to ensure that you have a visa for the next country. Often you don't even notice they've checked before they're waving you on.
I have seen people not allowed through because they didn't have the visa and have also had it questioned myself and then had to show them my second (or buisness passport) to prove I have the visa in that one before they let me leave the first country.

I also know of two Italians who left Kyrgyzstan, arrived at the Chinese border, had the correct tourist visas, but they hadn't got the paperwork to allow them to ride their motorbikes in China. They had no idea about all the bureacratic hoops that are necessary to take a vehicle into China.

They were unable to go back into Kyrgyzstan, and so had to proceed to Beijing on public transport (3,400 kms) to try and sort things out, leaving their bikes at the border post. I have no idea what happened in the end, but when I crossed the same border post a year later, there was no sign of their bikes although someone else's BMW was wrapped up and looking lonely in the corner of the customs yard.

If you need a carnet for the next country it could prove to be a similar or the same situation.

Hmmm, hope that's not too gloomy an answer for you - maybe someone else has a more cheery response.
__________________
Tiffany
On the road from...I'm not sure any more
http://www.tiffanystravels.co.uk
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XAUhV1r-kUo
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 8 Jan 2012
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Danmark
Posts: 330
Not on a motorbike but there was a man who got stuck and was living in a french airport for more than 10 years
__________________
Poul
May you enjoy peace and good health !
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 9 Jan 2012
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Seville (E) / Geneva (CH)
Posts: 530
Quote:
Originally Posted by pbekkerh View Post
Not on a motorbike but there was a man who got stuck and was living in a french airport for more than 10 years
That's real bad luck if you add that French airports are usually voted among the worst ones to sleep in!

I was crossing from Uzbekistan to Kazakhstan and there was a British girl who had her visa dates mistaken (she did not notice that before). She was offered to wait for 3 days in no man's land till the valid date! Only time I have ever tried to brive, subtly in my veeery poor Russian, but the Kazakh chief was the only one honest there (the rest, bastards and corrupt). In the end, after several long attempts, he just stamped the passeport and let her in (only a kiss in his cheek in exchange, no kidding!).
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 9 Jan 2012
ta-rider's Avatar
Banned
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Germany
Posts: 540
Hi,

The country where you came from has to take you back but think they cant force you. Hapened to me in Angola, because the boarder of the congo was allready closed but then i decidet to stay in nomansland for a night because this was the savest place. But dont want to live there for 10 Jears

LG, Tobi
Riding the rough west coast through Africa part 3
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 9 Jan 2012
Scrabblebiker's Avatar
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Victoria, BC, Canada
Posts: 222
Quote:
Originally Posted by pbekkerh View Post
Not on a motorbike but there was a man who got stuck and was living in a french airport for more than 10 years
This was actually someone without papers and who had been expelled from his own country (Iran) for his political views. That makes it a case very different from the average traveller.

It was a very bizarre story and the Tom Hanks movie "The Terminal" was loosely based on this man.


...Michelle
www.scrabblebiker.com
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 9 Jan 2012
Super Moderator
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: bellingham, WA, USA
Posts: 1,979
I met a Danish rider who had been stuck overnight in a Central American no-man's land due to his refusal to pay a bribe for entry. He and his partner tented overnight, but when he woke up he brushed at an itch on his head and was bitten by a scorpion! Furthermore, he was unable to convince the guards to expedite him through the border in order to get to a hospital.

I forget how it all ended, but I did see the photos: little scorpion, squashed flat--and he got a good story to tell at the pub in Colombia, where we met. Is there a moral to this story, aside from zipping the tent up securely at night?

Mark
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10 Jan 2012
Super Moderator
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Location: Nagano, Japan
Posts: 751
I had a bit of trouble at the Kazakh-Russia border. My multi-entry Russia visa was somehow rendered invalid by a trip into Mongolia where the border officials stamped me out ON the visa instead of next to the visa in my passport. I went back into Russia by the same Mongolian border, so they must have overlooked their own mistake.
A few weeks later going from Kazakhstan to Russia, the Kazakh guards told me my visa was no good, but let me try anyways. The Russians, however, were adamant that I go back a thousand kilometers to Almaty to get a new Russian visa (even though there was only a day left on my Kazakh visa!). After hours of negotiations, they accepted that it was their own officials' fault and let me through.
I got run over by a Lada the next day...
__________________
Japan touring information
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 31 Jan 2012
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by ta-rider View Post
Hi,

The country where you came from has to take you back but think they cant force you. Hapened to me in Angola, because the boarder of the congo was allready closed but then i decidet to stay in nomansland for a night because this was the savest place. But dont want to live there for 10 Jears

LG, Tobi
Riding the rough west coast through Africa part 3
Is that an international law, that the country you've left must let you back in? And where would you stand from there?
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 7 Feb 2012
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: London, W3 (the nice part though!)
Posts: 220
This happened to me crossing from Tajikistan to Kyrgizia. The Kyrgiz sent me packing, and weren't interested about how I might re-enter Tajikistan. I suspect that the country you've left is probably obliged to cancel your exit stamp in such a situation, though in that case I didn't find out as there was no way I was backtracking.

I got in touch with the (nearest) British embassy (because there is no embassy in Kyrgizia), who somehow arranged for me to be let through to get a new visa at the next important city, though only a day and a half after I arrived at the border.


In case you're wondering, the reason behind my troubles: When I applied for my Kyrgiz visa in Kazakhstan, I was criminally hungover/still pissed up and forgot to tell them I wanted a double entry visa. When I collected my passport I saw they'd ticked the box 'Single Entry' with biro, but because I was again hungover/still drunk from the night before, I did the polite English thing of asking them was it a double entry visa liked I'd asked for (I hadn't), and when they smiled and nodded and then pretended they didn't understand English in response I chose just to give up and accept what I'd got. When they didn't bother giving me an entry stamp when I entered the country I thought I was onto a winner, but the border I left through gave me two stamps. Coming back the same way the border officer was very friendly and pleasant right up untill he spotted I only had an already-used single entry visa, at which point he got very angry and frog marched me back into no-mans' land.

Moral of my story: Always have a working mobile phone. Even if you're in the middle of nowhere you'll probably still get a signal and it might prove indespensible. There may be other lessons hiding in there to do with not drinking too much or deliberately attempting to flout immigration laws, but that sounds quite boring to my mind.
__________________
UK to Mongolia 2009, on a DR350
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 7 Feb 2012
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: London, W3 (the nice part though!)
Posts: 220
And also, for what it's worth, my "No mans' land" experience was a crucial part of the story of how I got together with the girl who is now my wife.
__________________
UK to Mongolia 2009, on a DR350
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 7 Feb 2012
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Ljubljana Slovenija
Posts: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevo52 View Post
Is that an international law, that the country you've left must let you back in? And where would you stand from there?
Yes. You would be deported (home or "last coutry").
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 9 Feb 2012
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 20
This happened to me unfortunately due to a civil war. Luckily i had a double entry visa so i could make a u turn out of no mans land.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 13 Feb 2012
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Dublin, Ireland
Posts: 10
Thanks. I guess it seems that the last country will have to let you back in if all else fails. I just can't see the the Senegalese or Kazaks deporting you on a plane back to your own country having arrived at a land border!
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 13 Feb 2012
Gold Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 612
No Man's Land.

We, years ago I, British, was backpacking in Canada. My, I think 3 month, visa was about to run out. I knew that I could get another 3 month visa if I left Canada and returned immediately, it would be a separate visit.
I got a lift in a car from the hostel in Banff with a couple of guys just out for a drive to the US border and back as there was nothing else to do!!!!
At the border I said "Bye" to the immigration officer there with a grand backdrop of limitless pine trees. I crossed the no man's land, looking up and down the hundreds or thousands of miles of this band of short grass cutting across the forests. (my belongings were still in Banff).
At the US side I presented my passport, with no luggage, and answered the question of how I was travelling with, "hitch hiking". This turned out to be illegal in this state, Idaho. OK, "walking", I tried. 90 miles to the nearest town. Ah hm.
I had to walk back to the Canadian side without a US stamp to re-enter Canada. I had been refused a stamp into the US.
At Canadian side I told my tale and was told I couldn't enter Canada without visiting another country. Hm, Grrr. The officer had red hair and was of Scottish descent. He renewed my visa due to me being Scottish. Wow. I don't know what might have happened if he hadn't been flexible with the regulations, after all he put his name to a second visa without the clearly needed spell out of the country. I'm not quite so naive now.

International borders can be serious. Lindsay.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
London to Cape Town, November 2012 Tfoy97603 Travellers Seeking Travellers 56 4 Sep 2012 16:51
Crossing In To Iraq From Small Border Iran maximondo Middle East 8 13 Aug 2012 13:31
Iran/Turkmenistan Border Crossing peter04 Northern Asia 5 27 May 2012 13:51
Border crossing Armenia - Iran eljulian Europe 13 15 Feb 2012 08:14
Buying on the Guatemala Mexico border. Possible?will it work? gess68 Trip Paperwork 2 27 Dec 2011 18:52

 
 


HU DVD Summer Special!

Now that summer is here, get On the Road! Take 30% off the Achievable Dream - On the Road! 2-DVD set until August 31 only. Get On the Road! Learn the tips to staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure!

Our veteran travellers share their tips (and great stories) for staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure.

"A fantastic, informative and inspirational DVD."

"It's brilliant - thank you very much!"

Check it out at the HU Store! Remember to use Coupon Code 'ONTHEROAD' on your order when you checkout.


Renedian Adventures


Renedian Adventures

What others say about HU...

"I just wanted to say thanks for doing this and sharing so much with the rest of us." Dave, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the DVD series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring! The new look of the website is very impressive, updated and catchy. Thank you so very much!" Jennifer, Canada

"...Great site. Keep up the good work." Murray and Carmen, Australia

"We just finished a 7 month 22,000+ mile scouting trip from Alaska to the bottom of Chile and I can't tell you how many times we referred to your site for help. From how to adjust your valves, to where to stay in the back country of Peru. Horizons Unlimited was a key player in our success. Motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world are in debt to your services." Alaska Riders

contest pic

10th Annual HU Travellers Photo Contest is on now! This is an opportunity for YOU to show us your best photos and win prizes!

NEW! HU 2014 Adventure Travel T-shirts! are now available in several colors! Be the first kid on your block to have them! New lower prices on synths!

HU 2014 T-shirts now in!

Check out the new Gildan Performance cotton-feel t-shirt - 100% poly, feels like soft cotton!


What turns you on to motorcycle travel?


Global Rescue, WORLDwide evacuation services for EVERYONE

Global Rescue is the premier provider of medical, security and evacuation services worldwide and is the only company that will come to you, wherever you are, and evacuate you to your home hospital of choice. Additionally, Global Rescue places no restrictions on country of citizenship - all nationalities are eligible to sign-up!


New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80 G/S motorcycle.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events (22 this year!); we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, the HUBB or to receive the e-zine. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.


Books & DVDs

amazon

All the best travel books and videos listed and often reviewed on HU's famous Books page. Check it out and get great travel books from all over the world.


Motorcycle Express for shipping and insurance!

Motorcycle Express

MC Air Shipping, (uncrated) USA / Canada / Europe and other areas. Be sure to say "Horizons Unlimited" to get your $25 discount on Shipping!
Insurance - see: For foreigners traveling in US and Canada and for Americans and Canadians traveling in other countries, then mail it to MC Express and get your HU $15 discount!




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:14.