Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > Advisories and Urgent Information > Travellers' Advisories, Safety and Security on the Road

Travellers' Advisories, Safety and Security on the Road Recent News, political or military events, which may affect trip plans or routes. Personal and vehicle security, tips and questions.
Contact Overland Solutions for all your custom modifications and setup for overland travel.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 13 Feb 2010
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Truron Nova Scotia, Canada
Posts: 207
troubles at El Florido crossing into Honduras

I had trouble crossing into Honduras yesterday at El Florido...the folks on Honduras side said my bike registration is not an original document, which it definitely is. I think she wanted some bribe money which got my dander up. I asked to see her supervisor, she indicated she was where the buck stops. I asked for her name, she declined. I then took a picture of her and walked out saying this is not the end of the matter. The little Honduras guy tagging on to me as a wanna-be fixer might have been part of the problem as he glued himself to me even though I tried to ignore him and indicated I did not need his help...maybe subtle signals to Honduras lassie about cooperating on extracting cash. The registration/ownership document was accepted by Mexico and Guatemala...
Anyway I said screw Honduras and turned around.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 13 Feb 2010
Super Moderator
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: bellingham, WA, USA
Posts: 1,984
El Florido? Isn't that the crossing just down the road from Copan Ruinas? I had some of my best-on-record border experiences there a few months ago: complete absence of wannabe helpers; aduana flunkies running down the road in the heat to get photocopies made (for free); uniformed staff interrupting lunch break to process me through, etc. No one tried to overcharge me for anything, and all went speedily, if not exactly efficiently. To cap it off, when I didn't have correct change they refunded me some of what I genuinely owed (and had already been receipted for) and told me not to worry about it.

I'd suggest waiting for a shift change and trying again. All else aside, it's reportedly far more difficult at other crossings, and if you can't find your way into Honduras you're not going to South America, where borders are easier and the scenery more intense.

enjoy,

Mark
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 13 Feb 2010
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Truron Nova Scotia, Canada
Posts: 207
yes I know I will have to face up to another attempt at a Hondurus crossing...just wasn`t in the mood yesterday. Things were great on Guatamala side, then went to hell on Honduras side. I kept my cool for the longest time. Hopefully things will go better crossing from El Salvador.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 15 Feb 2010
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Kelowna, Canada
Posts: 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by larrysimpson View Post
yes I know I will have to face up to another attempt at a Hondurus crossing...just wasn`t in the mood yesterday. Things were great on Guatamala side, then went to hell on Honduras side. I kept my cool for the longest time. Hopefully things will go better crossing from El Salvador.
I think the El Salvador borders are the best!
Uniformed men come to your bike, speak english, get your papers and ten minutes later, you're good! Completely free in and out. On the Guat side there were no 'helpers' around and on the Hond side, he even helped me fend them off, and warned me about the scams at the Honduras entry!

Kudos to El Salvador for making it easy and feel welcoming to be a tourist in their country.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 15 Feb 2010
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Truron Nova Scotia, Canada
Posts: 207
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenthumb View Post
I think the El Salvador borders are the best!
Uniformed men come to your bike, speak english, get your papers and ten minutes later, you're good! Completely free in and out. On the Guat side there were no 'helpers' around and on the Hond side, he even helped me fend them off, and warned me about the scams at the Honduras entry!

Kudos to El Salvador for making it easy and feel welcoming to be a tourist in their country.
Right on. I crossed easily at San Christobal, people on both sides were great. And no charges! I thought they forgot or something...but I guess not. Cool. I went right to San Salvador, turned right for La Libertad. Then right not too many km. to Playa El Tunco, neat little hotel called Hotel Mopelia...it is in sort of a cluster of little hotels and restaurants and such along a little laneway off the hightway. Neat. Surfers around from Canada and US so nice to speak some english again. $20 a night for nice room in duplex bungalow with ceiling fan, no tv, $15 if you stay 3 nights. Get drinks and burgers, pizza, seafood, whatever and put it on the tab. Great. Oh yeah free wireless, and pool. I was only gonna stay one night but already changed that to 3, I need some relaxation from that border shit. THen to Nicaragua, yahoo (oops with a bit of Honduras again first).

Cheers
Larry
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 15 Feb 2010
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Rockhampton, Australia
Posts: 890
If and when you get to Nicuragua, drop in and say hi to Jimmy Three Fingers in Granada. He has a cheap hostel, has motorbikes, a bar, does nice food and is a top bloke. Just go to the main square and ask any kid on a pushbike, they all know him

Cheers
TS
__________________
www.travellingstrom.com
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 15 Feb 2010
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Truron Nova Scotia, Canada
Posts: 207
Quote:
Originally Posted by TravellingStrom View Post
If and when you get to Nicuragua, drop in and say hi to Jimmy Three Fingers in Granada. He has a cheap hostel, has motorbikes, a bar, does nice food and is a top bloke. Just go to the main square and ask any kid on a pushbike, they all know him

Cheers
TS
ok, thanks for the tip, will try to find him.
Cheers
Larry
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 15 Feb 2010
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Rockhampton, Australia
Posts: 890
It is called Hospeje Neustre Casa at his location

11.92993,-85.95716 - Google Maps

Say G'day from TS for me
__________________
www.travellingstrom.com
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 15 Feb 2010
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: B.C. Canada
Posts: 214
I had the same experience as Markharf at El Florido.
Fifteen minutes and as easy as pie.
Decent rate from the moneychangers too.
It's just the luck of the draw whether you are the one they think they can get a bit of money from.
I had a similar experience to you at the Ipiales,Colombia-Ecuador border.
It was Sunday afternoon(bad timing) and I was trying to cross into Ecuador.
The Colombian side was very professional and quick, but there was only one Aduana agent on the Ecuador side.
He did not like my bike paperwork and was fishing for a bribe.
I got mad and complained to the Ecuador Immigration guy who said he could do nothing(they were buddies).
So it was stamp out of ecuador immigration and back into Colombia.
The Colombian Immigration stamped me back in and just said it happens sometimes with "Those Ecuadorians".
Colombian Aduana just laughed and said to try again in the morning when all the regular workers are there. They did not even stamp the bike back in to Colombia.
I went back across in the Morning and it was no problem with all the regular Aduana agents there.

I never used helpers and only paid one bribe on my trip from Canada to Ushuia and back.
It was at the Costa Rica- Panama border.
About 5 kms into Panama was a military checkpoint.
The Jefe flagged me down. There were five soldiers surrounding the bike.
It was really hot and I was already tired from doing the border crossing ritual.
When I showed my willingness to spread all the contents of the panniers on the road for inspection the Jefe's quick buck scheme changed.
I was escorted into a small office and surrounded by soldiers.
The Jefe explained that they were all hot, thirsty and underpaid.
I replied that a cold would be really nice right then and asked how much was in Panama.
The surprised Jefe said was $.50.
I pulled three dollars out of my pocket. I gave it to the Jefe and told him to buy each of his men a .
He was trapped. His men all knew how much I had given him and what it was for.
I laughed as I walked out, loaded up the bike, and left.

P.S. El Amatillo crossing into Honduras is a bit of a gong show.
Get there early, and have "Mucho" patience with lots of copies of passport,title,etc...

Wish I was down there travelling with you.
Suerte
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 17 Feb 2010
PeteC's Avatar
Gold Member
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Las Cruces, New Mexico, USA
Posts: 9
El Amatillo, Honduras crossing.

You are right about the El, Almatillo border crossing being a mess. I did it in Jan. 2009 on my trip to Ushhuaia. It was only my 3rd crossing after the US?Mex. crossing at Columbus, New Mexico & it turned into a learning experience. There were agressive so called helpers, fees & copy charges. I made the mistake of letting the helper hold my paper work & some advanced money & I just followed around like a puppy. Next thing I knew the helper wanted more money saying there was another fee to pay & some copies. I protested, but he had me. I probable got ripped off for $20US. After this incedent I only used helpers that could speak at least a little English & told them they would not hold any paper work or money, their job was only to take me to each station & talk to the Customs staff. They would protest at first, but I would say it's that way or I get someone else. They usually gave in. This crossing was also long. At one point the helper said I was done I could leave, but just a little way down the road at a check point I was sent back to a different building because something wasn't stamped. It was getting dark as I left & asked about a hotel, but was told there wasn't one & would need to go to the next town. I went about 5 miles down the road in the dark, not a good thing & almost hit a donkey & then a pig. I asked some people near a house about hotels ahead & they said I'd be better going back & that there was a hotel at the border. I went back & sure enough was lead to a hotel, but it was a real dump & they wanted $20. I took it any way as it was late. It was a bad looking town. I was able to cable lock my moto to the bars on my rooms window. The good thing there was a guard walking around with a sawed off shotgun & I gave him a couple of dollars to watch my moto,for all that my have been worth. Any way it was all part of the adventure.

I did my trip on a Yamaha XT225. I am writing it up now & even though it has been almost a year since the complition I'd like to put the stry on this site.

Pete Chester
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 18 Feb 2010
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Truron Nova Scotia, Canada
Posts: 207
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteC View Post
You are right about the El, Almatillo border crossing being a mess. I did it in Jan. 2009 on my trip to Ushhuaia. It was only my 3rd crossing after the US?Mex. crossing at Columbus, New Mexico & it turned into a learning experience. There were agressive so called helpers, fees & copy charges. I made the mistake of letting the helper hold my paper work & some advanced money & I just followed around like a puppy. Next thing I knew the helper wanted more money saying there was another fee to pay & some copies. I protested, but he had me. I probable got ripped off for $20US. After this incedent I only used helpers that could speak at least a little English & told them they would not hold any paper work or money, their job was only to take me to each station & talk to the Customs staff. They would protest at first, but I would say it's that way or I get someone else. They usually gave in. This crossing was also long. At one point the helper said I was done I could leave, but just a little way down the road at a check point I was sent back to a different building because something wasn't stamped. It was getting dark as I left & asked about a hotel, but was told there wasn't one & would need to go to the next town. I went about 5 miles down the road in the dark, not a good thing & almost hit a donkey & then a pig. I asked some people near a house about hotels ahead & they said I'd be better going back & that there was a hotel at the border. I went back & sure enough was lead to a hotel, but it was a real dump & they wanted $20. I took it any way as it was late. It was a bad looking town. I was able to cable lock my moto to the bars on my rooms window. The good thing there was a guard walking around with a sawed off shotgun & I gave him a couple of dollars to watch my moto,for all that my have been worth. Any way it was all part of the adventure.

I did my trip on a Yamaha XT225. I am writing it up now & even though it has been almost a year since the complition I'd like to put the stry on this site.

Pete Chester

Yup, El Almatilo border crossing was so bad it was almost funny. I arrived a about 4:30 pm and had to wait for about 2.5 hours...I ignored the helpers and did change some money, holding on to mine while he showed me the calculation on his calculator, then he hands me my Nicaraguan money which is 100 short. He quickly gave me the other notes when I noticed. The aduana guy said his computer was down but some truckers managed to get through with the guy doing the work on the manual Olympia, I guess with a bit of lubricant involved. The truckers spoke up for me and finally there was a new guy on shift who helped me out..could really make that Olympia whirrr.
Got my documents but by then it was dark, which I think was part of the overall strategy. Anyway I was stopped by the last guy with the rope across the road and he basically asked me for $20 which I declined. So had to ride into Somato in the dark looking for hotel. Was lucky to find on on main drag called Americano for $10 and even a little wagon on the square selling pizza slices.
And today coming to Granada got stopped by cops on the road a couple times...one guy asked for poquito doing that thing with his fingers. I acted deaf and stupid and eventually they let me go. I DO NOT PAY BRIBES, I WOULD RATHER LOSE HOURS AND BE MISERABLE, but that is bone-headed me.
PS what is the word on insurance, seguro in Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama??
Cheers
Larry
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Border crossing Honduras - Nicaragua Twintraveller Central America and Mexico 0 18 Apr 2005 22:37
Border crossing Guatemala - Honduras Twintraveller Central America and Mexico 1 12 Apr 2005 00:03
Crossing Honduras and Nicaragua in April Twintraveller Travellers Seeking Travellers 0 30 Jan 2005 02:27
Easy border crossing in Honduras PatOnTrip Central America and Mexico 0 24 Dec 2004 06:50
Honduras Border Crossing info from 11/12 FREEFLOW Central America and Mexico 2 19 Dec 2004 02:37

 
 


HU DVD Summer Special!

Now that summer is here, get On the Road! Take 30% off the Achievable Dream - On the Road! 2-DVD set until August 31 only. Get On the Road! Learn the tips to staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure!

Our veteran travellers share their tips (and great stories) for staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure.

"A fantastic, informative and inspirational DVD."

"It's brilliant - thank you very much!"

Check it out at the HU Store! Remember to use Coupon Code 'ONTHEROAD' on your order when you checkout.


Renedian Adventures


Renedian Adventures

What others say about HU...

"I just wanted to say thanks for doing this and sharing so much with the rest of us." Dave, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the DVD series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring! The new look of the website is very impressive, updated and catchy. Thank you so very much!" Jennifer, Canada

"...Great site. Keep up the good work." Murray and Carmen, Australia

"We just finished a 7 month 22,000+ mile scouting trip from Alaska to the bottom of Chile and I can't tell you how many times we referred to your site for help. From how to adjust your valves, to where to stay in the back country of Peru. Horizons Unlimited was a key player in our success. Motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world are in debt to your services." Alaska Riders

contest pic

10th Annual HU Travellers Photo Contest is on now! This is an opportunity for YOU to show us your best photos and win prizes!

NEW! HU 2014 Adventure Travel T-shirts! are now available in several colors! Be the first kid on your block to have them! New lower prices on synths!

HU 2014 T-shirts now in!

Check out the new Gildan Performance cotton-feel t-shirt - 100% poly, feels like soft cotton!


What turns you on to motorcycle travel?


Global Rescue, WORLDwide evacuation services for EVERYONE

Global Rescue is the premier provider of medical, security and evacuation services worldwide and is the only company that will come to you, wherever you are, and evacuate you to your home hospital of choice. Additionally, Global Rescue places no restrictions on country of citizenship - all nationalities are eligible to sign-up!


New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80 G/S motorcycle.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events (22 this year!); we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, the HUBB or to receive the e-zine. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.


Books & DVDs

amazon

All the best travel books and videos listed and often reviewed on HU's famous Books page. Check it out and get great travel books from all over the world.


Motorcycle Express for shipping and insurance!

Motorcycle Express

MC Air Shipping, (uncrated) USA / Canada / Europe and other areas. Be sure to say "Horizons Unlimited" to get your $25 discount on Shipping!
Insurance - see: For foreigners traveling in US and Canada and for Americans and Canadians traveling in other countries, then mail it to MC Express and get your HU $15 discount!




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:49.