Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > Advisories and Urgent Information > Travellers' Advisories, Safety and Security on the Road

Travellers' Advisories, Safety and Security on the Road Recent News, political or military events, which may affect trip plans or routes. Personal and vehicle security, tips and questions.
Contact Overland Solutions for all your custom modifications and setup for overland travel.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 16 Apr 2008
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Omana,NE
Posts: 7
Traveling alone- How do I secure my supplies?

Overlanders of the world-

I'm planning a month long ride from Costa Rica to the US. I'm young, inexperienced and completely ignorant to what will confront me. This may be the least of my worries, but since I am traveling alone, what advice could you give me about making sure that the supplies on my bike doesn't suddenly disappear when I'm looking the other way?

Thanks,

Dave
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 16 Apr 2008
Billy Bunter's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: London, England
Posts: 192
Thefts & gifts.

I did London to Sydney overland by bike a couple of years ago alone... 18 months and a lot of fun, although some mediocre days and the odd crap day too, and anyone that says they have never had bad days travelling is either lying or in denial... however, the excellent, the good, the mediocre and even the odd bad day are all part of the travel experience and memories you will treasure for ever. As regards theft, i cant comment on your particular trip but i never lost anything to any sticky fingers until i arrived in Perth... where someone nicked a guide book! but that was it for the whole journey.

keep stuff locked up when on your bike, as there will be times when you have to leave stuff on your bike and go in somewhere, good locks on panniers, tank bag etc and keep personal stuff in a hidden wallet on you under your shirt with only the minimum of cash ever on display, just use the same sensible precautions you would if you were in your own home town.

Mind you, there was the opposite problem... people trying to give me stuff, i still have night mares about the bus people determined to pass me a water melon from the passenger windows as they were overtaking me at sixty odd on a narrow road...!!

I am sure you will be fine too, have a great time and enjoy the whole experience.

Will
__________________
Will

Some day so soon....

Last edited by Billy Bunter; 16 Apr 2008 at 22:45.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 16 Apr 2008
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Omana,NE
Posts: 7
Wow

Thats the first and coolest reply I've ever gotten. I think my rickter scale of anticipation just went from a 9 to a 15. Thanks a lot. I hope someday that I will be able to make a large such a long treck like London to Sydney.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 17 Apr 2008
charapashanperu's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Bristol, Maine, USA
Posts: 517
Dave,

The biggest problem is when camera gear, etc is showing. Before you get to a rest stop or town, put everything out of sight.

Other than that, Will pretty much said it, but there's more than the "so we can watch each others stuff on the bikes" reason for hooking up with other riders. What if you break down or have an accident???

I had a hard lockable case on the back and a backpack/tankpack. Usually I would throw the tankpack on my back to go into a store, but what works too it to use zip-ties on all the zippers. Takes them longer to figure out what they are and if they are pulled tight, it is difficult to get a knife tip inside them. You can easily clip them with a wire-cutter.


(on the bridge over the Iguazu river between Brazil and Argentina)

Also another trick is to stop at the market or somewhere they sell food on the street. Park your bike right there, stop and eat, make friends of the proprietor, then ask him/her to 'keep an eye on it' as you step into the market.

Also, we in the west are so regimented, we think we have to park neatly on the street, then go into a store where we can't see the bike. No, ride right up on the side walk, shut it off and politely push the bike into the store opening. The people understand, and after all you are coming to buy.

Also, go to your hostel/campground first, leave the bike there, then take LOCAL transport around to do your errands.

The simple people are the most noble, beware of big cities. Plan your trip away from anything over 50,000 pax. Heaven forbid you try to go thru Mexico City !!!!

Toby (charapa) Around the Block 2007 |
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 17 Apr 2008
loxsmith's Avatar
Gold Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Ex Bris, Australia
Posts: 447
Bike cover

Dave get yourself a black bike cover, make it look used, very used. Roll it in the dirt, a little oil here and there. The shittier it looks the better. Some covers have eyes at the bottom that you can put a padlock through, but that's a bit extreme. I use a bungie cord through both holes just to stop it flapping about or being blown away
Next thing you can do and it is so simple, is to get a 2 metre length of plastic coated wire rope around 6mm I think mine is, made up with eyes swaged on each end. When you stop somewhere take of your jacket and helmet, grip the end of the cable in one hand and feed it down one of the sleeves, grab the end of it with your other hand and pull it through, feed it through the helmet. Padlock the lot to your bike through the back wheel and up over the seat
It secures your riding gear and your bike. The cable crushes if bolt cutters are used but is still susceptible to a grinder. Cable rolls up to take up minimal space. It in effect buys you more time
Hope this helps
Glen
__________________
Feb 2014, currently travelling the America's on a Tiger 800XC

Live every day like it's your last, one day you'll get it right!!!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 17 Apr 2008
Matt Cartney's Avatar
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Edinburgh, Lothian, Scotland
Posts: 1,351
Remember that almost anything can be replaced on the road if they get nicked. Irritating but hardly the end of the world.

The obvious exceptions are your passport, bike papers, money and bike keys. I kept my passport and credit card and a bunch of cash in a neck wallet inside my clothing at all times. My bike keys I got duplicated and kept one on a cord around my neck. I kept two seperate stashes of cash in other places, for emergencies.

Everything else, including cameras etc. you just have to be philosophical about. As said, get good locks for your panniers and try to stay as wise as possible to dodgy situations, but don't worry about it too much or it will ruin your trip. Actually I don't think theft happens all that often. I've done a fair bit of travelling over the last fifteen years or so and the only time I had anything knicked was when I left a wad of notes on the passenger seat of my car with the windows rolled down in Morocco! (Talk about complacent!)

Matt
__________________
http://adventure-writing.blogspot.com

http://scotlandnepal.blogspot.com/

*Disclaimer* - I am not saying my bike is better than your bike. I am not saying my way is better than your way. I am not mocking your religion/politics/other belief system. When reading my post imagine me sitting behind a frothing pint of ale, smiling and offering you a bag of peanuts. This is the sentiment in which my post is made. Please accept it as such!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 17 Apr 2008
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: West Yorkshire UK
Posts: 1,227
My thoughts would match all the above. Don't worry if somebody takes a liking to the bag of fruit under your cargo net they probably need it rather more than you.

Stuff you can't replace easily I'd suggest getting a bit organised with. If it becomes automatic to put your GPS in your right hand jacket pocket and your papers in the swimmers pouch round your neck, your less likely to leave it on the seat and give some kid the opportunity to make a few quid simply because they can. The only major theft I've know was a chap who left his GPS on the seat at the Ceuta customs post.

In 13 years and three continents I've never had anything stolen except a tube of epoxy glue, a bunch of bannanas and a side stand hockey puck thing (than one annoyed me, It must have been another biker), so don't worry too much.

Andy
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 17 Apr 2008
Matt Cartney's Avatar
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Edinburgh, Lothian, Scotland
Posts: 1,351
Quote:
Originally Posted by Threewheelbonnie View Post
The only major theft I've know was a chap who left his GPS on the seat at the Ceuta customs post.
Ha! That's where I got my wad of notes nicked!

Matt
__________________
http://adventure-writing.blogspot.com

http://scotlandnepal.blogspot.com/

*Disclaimer* - I am not saying my bike is better than your bike. I am not saying my way is better than your way. I am not mocking your religion/politics/other belief system. When reading my post imagine me sitting behind a frothing pint of ale, smiling and offering you a bag of peanuts. This is the sentiment in which my post is made. Please accept it as such!
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 17 Apr 2008
Indoors's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Leicester, UK
Posts: 102
Others have more knowledge on this than I do but one piece of advice I did listen to was to get a Pacsafe.

If you haven't seen one, it's a wire mesh which you can put over soft luggage or your jacket or whatever when you stop and secure it to the bike. Don't keep it on all the time as it'll rub on bits of the bike, just when you stop and think you're going to be away from the bike for a while.

Good luck with your trip.

Indoors.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 17 Apr 2008
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Sheffield
Posts: 1,037
take two wallets for mugings (heaven forbid), that way if someone wants to rob you you can happily hand over a wallet with a few token notes in, some expired credit cards etc
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 20 Apr 2008
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Munich
Posts: 46
I wish I was as blessed as you guys! I've been on the road for 19 days now, and have been robbed twice. Yes yes, I know you're thinking here's a guy who's wet behind the ears etc, but I really consider myself not to be. First one was at campsite in Vienna after 5 days, where some cheeky fekr snuck inside my tent while I slept, and stole my tank bag that was at the bottom of the tent and under my sleeping bag and other kit. That contained my passport with Russia, Kazakh, Uzbek, and Indian visas. Luckily had 2 other passports elsewhere (spare UK and one USA), but the Russian consul in Vienna made me go back to the Uk to get my multi entry business visa. Buggers. Then to make up time, my riding buddy and I decided that I'd hotfoot it up to Kiev t get the replacement Uzbek visa. I ended up leaving the bike in Lviv at a friend's place and getting the train there for the friday to get my visa. I came back to Lviv last night to find my spare Michelin T63 gone, fuel cans gone, mirrors gone, and tank bag harness gone! What on earth use are most of those things to anyone!! Pretty pissed off now, and want to get out of Ukraine. Could Russia be any worse..?
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 20 Apr 2008
Caminando's Avatar
Moderated Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: DogZone Country
Posts: 1,227
Ouch!

Those thieving b***ards creeping in while you slept is a worry....
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 20 Apr 2008
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: tenerife
Posts: 70
theft

What an absolute bummer..........some scumbag going in the tent while you are asleep!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!Not heard of that before..might have to think about sleeping sideways across the entrance or one of the fishing bite indicator bells clipped somewhere, long as its not windy... much more surprised you were in Vienna, if it were Rabat I would have been less astonished....
When wandering around giving a tip to the parking man and promising the same small amount when you return always buys you some peace of mind...good with overnight watchmen at parkings.if you are in places where there is one of course....find out when he leaves so you can get back before he goes if overnight...dont tell him when YOU are coming back and he will keep an eye on your bike ( exactly the objective) so you dont slip off without his tip..
not too worry too much is probably the best advice or you will ruin your wandering around experience..I know thats easier said than done...

Last edited by bobbyrandall; 20 Apr 2008 at 13:03.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 20 Apr 2008
lorraine's Avatar
Veteran Traveller
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Definitely Nomadic
Posts: 418
Bummer Nick. Hopefully your bad luck is now over.

To reiterate a few things, old and tattered is good. My van's 30 years old and from the outside looks like a piece of crap, EVEN in third world countries. Stay away from big cities. In Lima, Peru, I stayed in a hotel, (usually camp) and had a canvas bag of dirty laundry inside the van. In the morning it was gone. The doors don't lock, so, what was I expecting? However, what I thought was interesting, was they grabbed the bag, but didn't look in any cupboards/drawers etc. So now, I've got a broken digital camera subtly displayed in the hope that if this happens again, they'll grab the camera, think they'll have scored, and run. I also have a hidden compartment for real valuables. This might be possible to do at the bottom of panniers for passport etc, though I realize space is more crucial on a bike. Still have the wallet with old credit cards, but after a few years, it's getting dusty... And yes, those routines of having a special place for each item is important when you're tired!!!!!
Lorraine
__________________
www.LorraineChittock.com All Over the Map - Radio & Travel Books www.facebook.com/lorraine.chittock
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 20 Apr 2008
DLbiten's Avatar
HU California Meeting Organiser
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Camano is. USA
Posts: 443
some of the packsafe items PacSafe from REI.com | 100% Satisfaction Guarantee | Customer Reviews
some good items here some locks and alarms (kids love them) Locks and Alarms :: Prevent Or Repair :: Aerostich/RiderWearHouse Motorcycle Jackets, Suits, Clothing, & Gear
Get a bungee net by the way

Nothing will stop a determined thief all this stuff dose is keep the honest people honest and adds a little piece of mind. And all your stuff is gust stuff most of it you dont need. Paper work is a pain to keep the neck safe is a good idea so is having copies and spares at home tucked in to hidden places on your bike.
To tell the truth when I started riding and traveling I lost more of my stuff off the back of my bike dew to bad tie downs, poor packing, and me just forgetting stuff trying to make time. Last year on a little week long trip almost ended when I came up to gas station to fill up and my bag on the back was gone man I had that funny feeling, do I go back look for it, gust get new stuff? Well to hell with all that I need a cold drink and gas first.
Walk around the bike to get all the tie downs and theres the bag in the ground! I did it again after tens of thousands of miles I pull another noobie mistake, under packed bag last checked at 7,000 feet at 40f and Im pulling in to near death valley at 0 feet 110f. Bag got hot vented all the air shrank down tie down bungees did not have enof spring geting hot and soft to hold the bag down it was only staying on because the road is strait, tilt the bike over on the kick stand and it slid off. I had enof stuff to fill the bag and a bungee net that will have fixed the problem but I dint use them. After all Im skilled I know what im doing its a short trip down the hill the straps im using rok straps are grate made gust for this bahh its good enof. Net NET! I dont need no stinking net! Some times I need to be taken down a peg I guess.
I lost my passport when I got home, think it went in the bin
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Supplies - Peru / Bolivia Rachel South America 0 20 Aug 2006 21:42
Shuberth C2 helmet supplies in Turkey - elp! colesyboy Europe 2 29 Jul 2006 09:56
Secure Parking in Niamey (Niger) javierCarrion sub-Saharan Africa 1 12 May 2006 18:17
Secure parking in Morocco? Gregorius Sahara Travel Forum 3 3 May 2006 22:28
good market for supplies in Tunisia? tmborden Sahara Travel Forum 0 8 Nov 2004 09:43

 
 
 

NEW! HU 2015 Motorcycle Adventure Travel Calendar is now available! Get your copy now for some terrific travel inspiration!

HUGE, 11.5 x 16.5 inches, beautifully printed in Germany on top quality stock! Photos are the winning images from over 600 entries in the 9th Annual HU Photo Contest!

Horizons Unlimited 2015 Motorcycle Adventure Travel Calendar.

"The calendar is magnificent!"

"I just wanted to say how much I'm loving the new, larger calendar!"

We share the profit with the winning photographers. YOU could be in the HU Calendar too - enter here!


HU DVD Autumn Special!

Take 40% off Road Heroes Part 1 until October 31 only!

Road Heroes features tales of adventure, joy and sheer terror by veteran travellers Peter and Kay Forwood (193 countries two-up on a Harley); Dr. Greg Frazier (5 times RTW); Tiffany Coates (RTW solo female); and Rene Cormier (University of Gravel Roads).

The first in an exciting new series, Road Heroes features tales of adventure, joy and sheer terror by veteran travellers."Inspiring and hilarious!"

"I loved watching this DVD!"

"Lots of amazing stories and even more amazing photographs, it's great fun and very inspirational."

"Wonderful entertainment!"

Check it out at the HU Store! Remember to use Coupon Code 'HEROES' on your order when you checkout.



Scottoiler automatic chain oilers. The most important accessory for your next motorcycle adventure!


Renedian Adventures


Renedian Adventures

What others say about HU...

"I just wanted to say thanks for doing this and sharing so much with the rest of us." Dave, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the DVD series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring! The new look of the website is very impressive, updated and catchy. Thank you so very much!" Jennifer, Canada

"...Great site. Keep up the good work." Murray and Carmen, Australia

"We just finished a 7 month 22,000+ mile scouting trip from Alaska to the bottom of Chile and I can't tell you how many times we referred to your site for help. From how to adjust your valves, to where to stay in the back country of Peru. Horizons Unlimited was a key player in our success. Motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world are in debt to your services." Alaska Riders

contest pic

10th Annual HU Travellers Photo Contest is on now! This is an opportunity for YOU to show us your best photos and win prizes!

NEW! HU 2014 Adventure Travel T-shirts! are now available in several colors! Be the first kid on your block to have them! New lower prices on synths!

HU 2014 T-shirts now in!

Check out the new Gildan Performance cotton-feel t-shirt - 100% poly, feels like soft cotton!


What turns you on to motorcycle travel?


Global Rescue, WORLDwide evacuation services for EVERYONE

Global Rescue is the premier provider of medical, security and evacuation services worldwide and is the only company that will come to you, wherever you are, and evacuate you to your home hospital of choice. Additionally, Global Rescue places no restrictions on country of citizenship - all nationalities are eligible to sign-up!


New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80 G/S motorcycle.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events (22 this year!); we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, the HUBB or to receive the e-zine. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.


Books & DVDs

amazon

All the best travel books and videos listed and often reviewed on HU's famous Books page. Check it out and get great travel books from all over the world.


Motorcycle Express for shipping and insurance!

Motorcycle Express

MC Air Shipping, (uncrated) USA / Canada / Europe and other areas. Be sure to say "Horizons Unlimited" to get your $25 discount on Shipping!
Insurance - see: For foreigners traveling in US and Canada and for Americans and Canadians traveling in other countries, then mail it to MC Express and get your HU $15 discount!




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 17:32.