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-   -   Buying a Land Cruiser (http://www.horizonsunlimited.com/hubb/toyota-overland-tech/buying-a-land-cruiser-55414)

Miruna 9 Feb 2011 18:07

Buying a Land Cruiser
 
Hello,

I didn't quite know where to raise this question so I chose to make a new thread, I hope that's ok. I'll get right to the point:

I'm planning on taking an overland trip with a '90s Toyota Land Cruiser 3 years from now. The plan is to buy the car at least one and a half years in advance, so I have time to make all the required changes and get used to it. I have been prospecting the market so as to get an idea of what Land Cruisers are available for sale in Romania (where I live) and what the prices are. I came across a great car whose price dropped from 8000 euros to 6900 euros in the past few weeks. It's a '98, 2989 cc, 126 hp, diesel Land Cruiser and it's registered in Romania, which is a big plus, considering the aberrant first registration tax over here. It has 170.000 km (110.604 miles) and basically has all I'm looking for.
I could buy it now but I have no place to store it, I would have to keep it in a parking lot and pay the annual car tax, which is 250 euros per year. That means that I would basically lose 500 euros if I buy it 2 years (1 and a half actually) earlier than I planned.
My questions are:
1 - Would being kept in a parking lot for almost 2 years (I would most likely drive it every other weekend, but still) do a lot of damage to the car?
2 - How will the market change? The number of '98 Land Cruisers is obviously limited, so I'm concerned that if I don't buy it now, I'm going to have a lot more trouble finding one (not to mention one with all the advantages of this particular one) two years from now. I'm wondering what most people leaving by car will use after the world runs out of '90s Land Cruisers. :laugh:

Here is a link to some images of the car. The text is in romanian but you get the point:Toyota jeep 6900 euro inmatriculat ro - Automobile: Pagina rezultate detaliate

Basically, I'm asking if it's best to buy it now or wait a while longer.

Thank you,
Miruna.

Mart456 10 Feb 2011 20:19

Hi Miruna

Throughout Europe, especially Spain & Georgia, there is a helathly supply of second hand 90's. There are also many for sale in the UK, we bought our 90 (1998 Vx) nearly two years ago for £2800, i would say the price your being quoted is way above the average in other markets, maybe its the tax there, but if your going overland, why not buy the Land Cruiser from another country and save on the tax?

It goes with out saying it is good to buy the tuck in advance of your trip to wear it in, and make sure it has no issues but 2-3 years may be excessive.

For the same price in two years time you may be able to pick up a good 80 or 100 series,

You say "not to mention one with all the advantages of this particular one" what advantages would they be?

does it have a working rear diff lock ?

moggy 1968 10 Feb 2011 23:37

if you find a realy good one buy it, because sods law says when your looking for one you won't find one!
I've exported cars to eastern europe so I know the problems with import duties so you will find prices are significantly higher where you are. thats just down to supply and demand. there simply aren't the cars in country in sufficient numbers to get the prices down.

Miruna 11 Feb 2011 23:12

the 100 series
 
Would the 100 series be reliable for a 2 year overlanding trip? I'm asking because of all the electrical components the car has, which makes it a lot harder, if not impossible for me to fix it in case of an emergency, on the side of the road or in a shop in the middle of nowhere. Also, wouldn't spare parts be a problem, seeing as this model is not so popular in remote areas?

Maximus 12 Feb 2011 11:17

Quote:

Originally Posted by Miruna (Post 323798)
Would the 100 series be reliable for a 2 year overlanding trip? I'm asking because of all the electrical components the car has, which makes it a lot harder, if not impossible for me to fix it in case of an emergency, on the side of the road or in a shop in the middle of nowhere. Also, wouldn't spare parts be a problem, seeing as this model is not so popular in remote areas?

I watch this thread with intrest, as I too am thinking of going LC, but do not want fly by wire or anything that needs a laptop to fix it.

twenty4seven 12 Feb 2011 15:15

Quote:

Originally Posted by Maximus (Post 323868)
I watch this thread with intrest, as I too am thinking of going LC, but do not want fly by wire or anything that needs a laptop to fix it.

Hello Mac

I'm very happy with my 1997 LWB 95 series (Called Colorado in the UK). It's done ~ 10'000 kms of travel in Morocco with as much of that on pistes as possible.

3.0 TD LWB 1996-2000 (KZJ95) engine type 1KZ-TE indirect injection some suffered head problems and the radiator can fail between the automatic fluid side and the water side which allows water into the auto gear box, not a big deal to buy a new rad as a precaution if you fancy one and it's an Auto. There is not a great deal of electrics on this model certainly no limp modes and best of all there are plenty around so good value.

The same shape also had a later engine fitted

3.0TD LWB 2000-2002 (KDJ95) engine type 1KD-FTV more power and uses less fuel although more to go wrong maybe? some 1KD-FTVs were known to have injector problems which destroyed the engine, this does seem to be rare though.

The replacement for the 95 series was the 120 series ~ 2002 onwards this has based of the 95 series with the 1KD-FTV (D4-D) engine, I think JoJo on here did many thousands of kms travelling in one of these and they are tougher than they look.

The big modern (ish) Landcruisers and maybe the best thats still easy to buy in the UK? are the 80 Series and the 100 Series (Some called Amazon in the UK) both have straight six 4.2L diesel's.

I have never owned either so will leave it to others to comment.

Hope that helps a bit

Matt.

Miruna 13 Feb 2011 11:51

Hello again and thank you for your answers.

From what I've read on various forums, it would seem that the best option would be the 80 series. When you guys mention the 100 series as a very good option, do you mean the standard 100 or the 105? What exactly is the difference between the 100 and the 105 as potential overlanding vehicles?

Greets,
Miruna

Maximus 13 Feb 2011 19:56

Quote:

Originally Posted by Miruna (Post 323988)
Hello again and thank you for your answers.

From what I've read on various forums, it would seem that the best option would be the 80 series. When you guys mention the 100 series as a very good option, do you mean the standard 100 or the 105? What exactly is the difference between the 100 and the 105 as potential overlanding vehicles?

Greets,
Miruna

Thing that puts me off the 4.2 80 series is the fuel consumption around town. Ok I suppose if you are buying cheap fuel in Africa and the likes. But I would only be venturing to Morocco for a month each year.

For that reason I am looking at the 100 series (colorado D4D engine) at the moment.

Great info Matt

Peter Girling 13 Feb 2011 22:39

80,100 and 105 series
 
All of these models have a 4.2 lt diesel engine. The 80 and 100 have turbo and are widely available in the UK and Europe.

The 80 and 105 have live axle and coil springs front and rear, the 100 has IFS with torsion bar, not so good for overland.

The 105 was built for the developing world and was never marketed in the UK or Europe and is much rarer.

If you see a 105 advertised, buy it. If it's in good condition, it's an ideal overland vehicle. If not, pick up an 80 series later.

Happy trails,

Jojo


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