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  #1  
Old 25 Jan 2013
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Thoughts on slowing down.

There is this desire to get somewhere fast, or at least travel fast. Why? Surely a significant reason for the trip is to see things and that is better done at a slower pace?

In an effort to figure out how to slow myself down, so that I see more, I think;
  • Every 30 minutes or so stop and take a look around, take at least one photo and have a drink.
  • Never take a tunnel when that is an above ground route available.
  • Try to take back roads rather than highways as the traffic should be slower there.

What methods do you use to slow yourself down?

The only problems I see are are;
if you are significantly slower (or faster for that matter) than the traffic expects you to be, you have a higher risk of accident.
The trip will take longer, so suitable sleeping places will have to be closer together. If they aren't then your stuck with a higher speed.

PS
These 30 minute photos could be strung together as an animated gif to present a fast view of the trip … if the photos are consistent for say the forward view of the road than there will be some consistency to them so they sit together.
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  #2  
Old 25 Jan 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Warin View Post
What methods do you use to slow yourself down?
This time I will be riding a Honda 125, that should do the trick. Having toured on a bicycle last time, it will actually seem quite fast in comparison and certainly in India and SE Asia even on a bicycle with no camping gear there was no problem finding accommodation, although I realise this would not be the case everywhere.
There is a potential safety problem with a slower bike in some traffic conditions but planning your route should minimise this, I think overtaking slower vehicles like lorries will be the biggest problem.
An interesting thought on stopping every so often for a photo, I am not sure I could be bothered every half an hour but perhaps every time I stop for something, petrol, food or the night would be worth doing.
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  #3  
Old 25 Jan 2013
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Talking

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Originally Posted by Warin View Post
What methods do you use to slow yourself down?
a belt on the back of my helmet or poke in the ribs from swmbo usually does it
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  #4  
Old 25 Jan 2013
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some times i feel like its a man thing.
every long distance trip i take in a car i try to make 'good time' always rushing annoyed if the departure is delayed. i feel i also carry this across into my bike trips.
one way which did slow me down was joining up and riding for a couple weeks with a vespa. that thing was slow, but i gave me a ton of time to just chill and take in the surroundings.
i think for my next trip i will just set shorter day mileage goals. if i only have to do 200 miles in the whole day i will take my time. sometimes its handy when you are riding as a group because someone will want to stop fairly regularly.
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Old 25 Jan 2013
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Originally Posted by Planet-Muncher View Post
a belt on the back of my helmet or poke in the ribs from swmbo usually does it
And when I used to ignore them a blow to the kidneys often did the trick.
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  #6  
Old 25 Jan 2013
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What methods do you use to slow yourself down?
I drive a Land Rover Disco 300TDi....that will slow anyone down
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  #7  
Old 26 Jan 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Warin View Post

What methods do you use to slow yourself down?
I ride a 22year old Transalp...
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  #8  
Old 27 Jan 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Warin View Post
What methods do you use to slow yourself down?
As well as a slower speed on the road, how about staying longer in each place?
Making some sort of connection with local life.

"The mode of locomotion should be slow, the slower the better, and be often interrupted by leisurely halts to sit on vantage points and stop at question marks."
(Carl Sauer, president of the Association of American Geographers).

One good way of doing this is visiting a barber for a haircut. Places I remember doing this, looking for a ?, include Aswan, Egypt; Kigoma, Tanzania; Santarem, on the Amazon, Brasil; Panajachel, Guatemala and Tombstone, Arizona.
Always an interesting and unexpected outcome! (Including in Tombstone). No common language needed!

Then there's visiting a local library. Even if it's in a place where you don't know the language, looking inside can lead to some handy bit of local information.

Record shops and CD street stalls can be Aladdin's Caves of music never encountered before. In my experience, a foreigner in these places always gets a special welcome.

Then of course, there's the village motorbike shop. Go in, just for a look.

Save the bars, restaurants and cafes for after that lot.
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Old 27 Jan 2013
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For me the object of any trip is simply to ride my bike and enjoy it. I do set an aspirational destination and a loose itinerary but don't normally fret much whether I do 30 miles in a day or 400. The big thing is not to have a tight schedule. Sometimes this can't be avoided ( ferry crossing for instance). but as far as possible I try to avoid all constraints of time or route. I sold my BMW some years back and now ride an Enfield on solo trips. It is more comfy , cruises a tad slower, but although my MPH is less my MPD (miles Per Day) is the same.
I have also one a few trips in my old car (1989 Fiat tipo 1.4) It means I can carry more and for the two of us it suits as two up and all the camping gear does not make for a comfy motorcycle ride.
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Old 8 Feb 2013
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I'm not a fast rider by no mean's. The way I do it, is get up and on the road early. Set a time at the end of the day to stop. I usually say between 5 and 6 pm. If it look's good and I feel good ride for another hour. That way I can do about 300 mile's in a day. Three 300 mile day's can get you a fair old way to where you want to be.

This speed thing is. If I can ride faster than you, I'm a better rider. I think if I live longer than you. Then I'm the better rider. Each to there own.
John933
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Old 8 Feb 2013
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Originally Posted by John933 View Post
I'm not a fast rider by no mean's. The way I do it, is get up and on the road early. Set a time at the end of the day to stop. I usually say between 5 and 6 pm. If it look's good and I feel good ride for another hour. That way I can do about 300 mile's in a day. Three 300 mile day's can get you a fair old way to where you want to be.

This speed thing is. If I can ride faster than you, I'm a better rider. I think if I live longer than you. Then I'm the better rider. Each to there own.
John933
Very true John. When I first started riding a bike back in 1961 there were eight of us in our little group of tight knit friends. Now only two of us are left alive. Oddly the two who were the oldest oldest.
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  #12  
Old 8 Feb 2013
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Never take a tunnel when that is an above ground route available. Try to take back roads rather than highways as the traffic should be slower there.
Pubs work for me haven't found one in a tunnel to date
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Old 11 Feb 2013
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My daughter, after her first bike tour last summer (France and Germany on the back of the Sprint):

"Dad, next time, can we go half as fast and see twice as much?"

Sprint now sold
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  #14  
Old 12 Feb 2013
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Slowing down

Last year I took part in a sponsored moped ride from Cheshire to the isle of Arran and back. I took a Puch Maxi. We covered around 800 miles in five days at a steady 30mph. Because we were all doing the same speed, it wasn't a problem and we all had a great time.
Cheers, Ru.
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Old 13 Feb 2013
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I'd rather do something like that, than the kind of 'Southern Spain and back in three days' that most of the magazines think of as 'touring'.
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