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  #1  
Old 7 Apr 2010
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Hold fire on that new Ducati Multistrada...

...cos there's a new Aprilia coming later this year that looks more convincing. In two versions, a 750 and 1200 V-Twin but with a narrower angle than the Duke giving more clearance plus the more dedicated enduro 750 has the 21 inch front wheel the Multistrada lacks.

Should be much cheaper too




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  #2  
Old 7 Apr 2010
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Ah but will it have trick adjustable suspension? The thing I like about the Multistrada, or at least the Multistrada reviews, is the way you can tune the suspension to either the load you are carrying or the surface you're riding on at the touch of a button. To me, that's the deal maker between the Multistrada and the Adventure 990, which is/was the other option.
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Old 7 Apr 2010
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I have serious doubts whether the trick air suspension can keep up with a "real" setup, especially off-road. The Multistrada makes a nice road touring bike, where the word "road" includes gravel roads. I don't think it's an option for leaving the road, which the KTM clearly is.

The Aprilia does look interesting. Looks like it would deserve the Tenere name more than what Yamaha recently came up with
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  #4  
Old 7 Apr 2010
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That 750 motor is a peach , and no mistake. I love the Doursoduro, it rides like it's made from fire and brimstone, so if the Tuareg is anything like the rumours then it'll be a peach too. Then again, the Super Tenere was rumoured to be a stonker, and turned out a little less than the hype (probably still a very good bike, but not what it was billed as).

I don't think it's fair to compare the Aprilia with the new Multistrada, chalk and cheese realy. The Multistrada is an awesum bike, it's quality built and well thought out, but it's no desert raider, not even a decent adventure bike, it's a powerhouse of a tourer. Have a good look around the bike and the clues are there, plastics (expensive Ducati plastics!) indicators in the hand guards (and they look both expensive and easyish to destroy), alloy wheels, small front wheel, the bike might have an enduro setting, but I think anything more than a gravel road and the bike would flounder. I'm still waiting for a test ride (any day now!!), but this isn't going to be an off road sand cleaver, more of a transcontinental mile muncher.

Of course the Multistrada is available now, and the 1200 Aprilia is still an asperation.


The other one to consider is Honda, the Varadero is getting long in the tooth and is probably more comparable with the Multistrada, but are Honda going to bring out a version of a 1200 AT, or another Varadero with the v4 VFR motor in it ? It's well overdue an update and Honda would be crazy to miss out on some of this market, or will they just retire from it?
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Old 7 Apr 2010
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Good sense spoken above; the Ducati is an ace bike but needs substantial adaptations to make it an adventure bike (although "as is" it makes the BMW look old fashioned) and whilst less, the Aprilia will also. Perhaps the 1200 Aprilia would be more comparable to the Ducati but there are fewer details on that bike as yet.

That Aprilia 750 engine does look good though; more compact than any other and Aprilias are eminently tunable. All in all, the 750 looks like a good bike on which to base a true adventure bike. Let's hope they read forums like this and don't bottle it.
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Old 7 Apr 2010
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If that picture is to scale and the rear wheel is a 19" rim I make the seat height a little over 42". Yet I see no where to mount a step ladder so I could get on it
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Old 7 Apr 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GasUp View Post
That 750 motor is a peach , and no mistake. I love the Doursoduro, it rides like it's made from fire and brimstone, so if the Tuareg is anything like the rumours then it'll be a peach too.
Do you own a Dorsoduro? I've only seen them in the dealers. They look great but I don't know anyone who actually owns one and I've not ridden one.
What's it like? How many miles have you done so far?
Quote:
Originally Posted by GasUp View Post
The other one to consider is Honda, the Varadero is getting long in the tooth and is probably more comparable with the Multistrada, but are Honda going to bring out a version of a 1200 AT, or another Varadero with the v4 VFR motor in it ? It's well overdue an update and Honda would be crazy to miss out on some of this market, or will they just retire from it?
The world has been waiting for Honda to get off the dime for about 10 years (at least) now. My idea was for them to use the RC51 sport bike motor in an all new Africa Twin. Use CRF450 based chassis, make it tour-able, add a few amenities and its there. Honda have been winding down production of the Varadero for years now. They were giving them away in the UK a couple years ago and I'm not sure they are even imported to the UK now. The Varadero is done. Never any good. I don't see an upgrade coming at this point.

I agree regards Multistrada and Tuareg being Chalk & Cheese. The Multi will be for rich sports bike guys who want to tour with their BMW GS buddies. The Multi will be a great bike as the ultimate sports tourer.
Would I go RTW on one? Never. (can't afford it anyway!)

Aprilia has a great opportunity with the Tuareg. A 750 could be the new perfect middle weight Adventure bike. Could knock out the DL650 Wee Strom and If done well, could undercut KTM's 990 as well.

But lots of question marks here. Since Piaggio are now doing the motors In-House and no longer using Rotax, there are unknowns here. Do they know what they are doing? Making the jump from 10 HP scooter motors to 100 + HP motors is a big deal. They claim to have the engineering depth to do this. Time will tell.

The Shiver and Dorsoduro are too new to really know how good they are or if they are truly reliable for the basis for a RTW platform. Piaggio have also been building the little v-twin dirt/supermoto bikes as well. Mixed reviews on those as early ones had LOTS OF PROBLEMS. (450 and 550 V-twins)
But now they are winning enduros! Can Piaggio do it?

The key for the Tuareg will be weight. If Aprilia can make it light enough, yet strong, it could kick butt.

In this mix of middle weight adventure bikes you also have to look at Triumph. Triumph are coming along with a new dual sport based on the 675cc Daytona motor. This new "Tiger Cub" could be very interesting. The 675 motor is super light yet makes over 100 HP. Its also very small, so a smaller adventure bike could possibly be built around it. We'll see. Should be out later this year. (Milan Show)
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  #8  
Old 8 Apr 2010
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Originally Posted by Mickey D View Post
Do you own a Dorsoduro? I've only seen them in the dealers. They look great but I don't know anyone who actually owns one and I've not ridden one.
What's it like? How many miles have you done so far?
The short answer is no. I've ridden one a number of times (dealer had one as a demostrator) and it's truly an awesum bike, even the quality is better than Aprilia of old. However it just isn't practical, it's very high and stupidly quick, but the mode selection (for throttle response) is good. I find it pretty much unridable in town in sports mode, but superb in normal mode (forgive me I forget the actual names of the modes now).

Smiles per mile are very high. You are thankfull (just for the sake of your licience) to get back to a slower bike afterwards though.

One thought about the 750 motor though, it is maybe a little too powerfull for an off-road bike, hopefully the mode selections will de-tune it for the rough stuff.
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Old 8 Apr 2010
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Aprilia do make a good bike, their big V-Twins are superb and the new RSV-4 is a great example of what modern design techniques can achieve, the attention to detail and packaging to make a "big" bike tiny is really done well. If only they could apply that level of attention to an adventure bike...

My problem with most of these bikes is that they are just the bike equivalent of car "soft roaders" which have traits of an adventure bike, resemble them in some ways but clearly, the designers have NEVER used and adventure bike in the real world, or lived with it so what they produce are really pathetic anf for people like them who don't know any better.

I like KTM's as a bike and as a company because there is no bull s**t about them, they make honest, tough bikes with no pretensions and they have genuine off road pedigree. I still think their 950 super enduro is the definitive basis for an adventure bike.

That Triumph 675 engine would make a sound basis for a bike; it would need a dry sump (take a look at one and you will see why) but I can't envisage Triumph doing anything different to what most other makers do - simply "style" a bike to resemble an adventure bike. I find that attitude a little cynical and dishonest but I hope they prove me wrong. With the possible exception of KTM there's no Land Rover of the biking world out. there.
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Old 9 Apr 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fastship View Post
Aprilia do make a good bike, their big V-Twins are superb and the new RSV-4 is a great example of what modern design techniques can achieve, the attention to detail and packaging to make a "big" bike tiny is really done well. If only they could apply that level of attention to an adventure bike...
Great post and spot on.
Ride reviews on the RSV-4 are 100% positive. But guess what? Every single bike has been recalled ... for a NEW MOTOR! Some screw up with the crank.
Can you imagine the cost? Good news is, at least in the US is that not that many had been sold yet. Some potential customers may not have heard about the recall.
Have you heard about this in the UK? Or maybe a different batch of cranks there and no recall at all?

Great comments about "soft roaders". So true.
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Old 9 Apr 2010
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I was aware of that US recall for the RSV-4 bit haven't heard of anything similar in Europe. On the one hand, it's great that they took such action "no questions asked" but on the other hand, here in Europe consumer laws and or less litigious consumers might cause a less radical course of action i.e. "you bought it sucker!". It could also just be it was the bad batch that went to the US too. I would imagine Aprilia are brand building in the US so the recall cost would have been worth the expense in the long term.

There was a problem with parts supply in the UK a few years ago and I read in this months bike magazine that the old RSV's depreciated in value by ~50% in the first year. It makes a year old 5,000 mile bike a seriously tempting bargin.
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Old 12 Apr 2010
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I went to the Moto GP last night and saw the Ducati Multistrada and the KTM 990 Adventure side by side. My first impressions of the the Multistrada were not good, which was a shame as I really wanted to like the bike but;
Who on earth though it was cool to put the indicators in the handgrip protectors! What a totally daft idea! One drop or brush with anything and you have a huge bill for a custom Ducati part, ride without it and the nasty policemen licks his lips as he sharpens his pencil....
The bike dosent look finished, the front mudguard is way too short, all the sh1t will come up off the wheel straight into the radiator, same with the back wheel, silly little hugger. Apparently the Multistrada will come with 2 sets of mudguards, sounds like they admit the short ones are not fit for purpose, another case of style over functionality?
The bike is covered with sticky outy bits, the gear and brake pedal end parts dont fold back, the front valance is just there for show.
Overall the thing will not survive being dropped.
On to the KTM; clean lines, everything that sticks out folds back on impact, the front valance looks as if it will keep even large rocks off the delicate bits, the whole thing looks like it will survive pretty much anything, and it has adjustable front and rear suspension too, and on board engine management using something called a throttle, a wrist and a brain.
Have I just talked myself into buying a KTM? But I love Ducati! Heart, head, head, heart....
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Old 12 Apr 2010
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I used to work as an Aprilia dealer and have "played" with the Dorsoduro a bit... STONKING bike.. Very quick, strong engine and bags of fun but not at all practical, but supermotos aren't meant to be.

The Tuareg looks great. I reckon the engine will be down tuned and smoothed out making it a great option.

Sadly, although Aprilia have come a long way with their reliability problems, it's still nowhere as good as the Jap stuff or their Italian brothers at Ducati. Electric niggles and poor build quality is always a nag with Aprilia. We were always getting bikes in with dodgy this, dodgy that... It's something you learn to live with as the bikes are a hoot, but I don't know if id really trust an Aprilia on a RTW....

Still, this looks WAY better than Yamahas idea of a knarly adventure bike. The Tenere dissapointed many so lets hope this fits that gap in the market.
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  #14  
Old 14 Apr 2010
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I've got a Shiver, and its a cracking bike, motors great, suspensions pretty good (non adjustable front, pre-loads adjustable on the back but thats it) brakes are fantastic, seats not bad, its pretty high, fairly big but not too heavy.
I've had no reliability issues with mine in 6000miles, but the finish isn't brilliant, a few bits of paint rubbing or flaking off mostly. Parts availability isn't supposed to be very good though.

That Toureg looks good, if it becomes a reality, they've been talking about the 1200 shiver and dorsoduro for a few years now but i haven't seen anything concrete to suggest were getting them anytime soon! Likewise for the new 675 tiger, now thats a bike that would tempt me away from my shiver!!
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So, where would you mount your panniers?

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