Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > Chat Forum > The HUBB PUB

The HUBB PUB Chat forum - no useful content required!

BUT the basic rules of polite and civil conduct which everyone agreed to when signing up for the HUBB, will still apply, though moderation will be a LITTLE looser than elsewhere on the HUBB.
Contact Overland Solutions for all your custom modifications and setup for overland travel.

Like Tree4Likes

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #16  
Old 28 Jan 2013
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: UK
Posts: 3,370
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Spafford View Post
Did a short trip last year through europe and did the stella alpina (which got featured in ABR magazine).
Did you get to the top in 2012, or did the snow drifts stop the bikes?
__________________
Dave
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 28 Jan 2013
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: York
Posts: 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walkabout View Post
he had a lot less trouble on this second journey with the bike maintenance, shaft drive and all.
He writes. 'Where was that man, that "Jupiter", who once sat contentedly under a tree by the roadside in India, confident that somehow, someone would bring help and usher in a new adventure?'

I don't think he saw the improved reliability as a bonus, I think he drops the bike at some point and struggles to pick it up and as a passing truck stops to help, he begins to remember the essence of his first trip where the help and interaction of others afforded him his unique experience.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 28 Jan 2013
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: UK
Posts: 3,370
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benny_76 View Post
He writes. 'Where was that man, that "Jupiter", who once sat contentedly under a tree by the roadside in India, confident that somehow, someone would bring help and usher in a new adventure?'

I don't think he saw the improved reliability as a bonus, I think he drops the bike at some point and struggles to pick it up and as a passing truck stops to help, he begins to remember the essence of his first trip where the help and interaction of others afforded him his unique experience.
Absolutely!
The breakdown was just part of the experience for TS.
He is a traveller/author who happened to be using a motorcycle as the means of transport.
__________________
Dave
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 28 Jan 2013
spooky's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Utopia/Germany
Posts: 280
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mezo View Post
Just because Ewen & Thingy did it on a GS doesn't mean its right, ask Ted Simon.
Mezo.
and there was one mention where this two admitted that the KTM adventure most probably would have been the better choice and that they may would have been better off just buying this them self than asking for this "free - Bavarian - propaganda" bikes...
well at a point where they bogged down there GS's in Russia... but the camera man on his Russian bike just went past them across the heavy section without trouble and keeped filming the two prat's stuck in the mud... they went jalousie that moment which they admitted...
__________________
The trouble is that he was talking in philosophy, but they were listening in gibberish.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/hobgoblinontour
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 28 Jan 2013
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: UK
Posts: 3,370
Sorry Jason!
I was the first to go

Back on topic, how did your tourathings perform on the Stella Alpina??
__________________
Dave
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 28 Jan 2013
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Border Ranges Northern NSW, Australia
Posts: 737
My mate knows Ted well, he`s listed in his book & when he was staying at his place he asked the question "what`s the best bike to do a RTW" something simple, a single, air cooled, something he could pick up on his own & packed lightly he replied.

And he was talking as if he was doing it again for the first time knowing what he knows know, of course if someone throws a GS his way for free he`ll ride it.

I guess if your journey is mostly tarmac then a 1200 Beemer or likewise is the one to take, if it involves the rough stuff then you would more suited to a smaller/lighter bike.

A 600 is plenty big enough i think, and as ive gotten older something smaller like a Japanese air cooled 250 is even more appealing.

Mezo.
__________________
http://www.tenere.co.uk/
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 29 Jan 2013
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 67
Hello
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walkabout View Post
There is a lot of evidence that the 1200GS is one of the best, if not the best, all round bike for two up riding


I have met only a few 1200GS on the road.
Most of them stay on the tarmac.
If you ask them why they travel with that bike , they always say something like this:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason Spafford View Post
I bought the GSA in the pic above and decked it out with touratech stuff but the more i speak to people on the subject the more i feel i could of saved a bit of cash ( i blame Ewan & Charlie :-)
There's a lot of evidence around that you can do it "even" with a 1200GS.

Jason

Since you already have the bike and bought some TT stuff then go with it.
If you haven't bought all, then just stop buying.
Except for this:
Frame protectors BMW R 1200 GS/Adventure silver | Touratech AG
or your frame will brake.


sushi
__________________
My RTW:
http://www.youtube.com/user/MrXt660ztenere
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 29 Jan 2013
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: UK
Posts: 3,370
I would never ride two up on my XT.
Anywhere, or any distance, and particularly not with the wife on the back (I have to live with her after all).
Incidentally, those who choose to advocate suchlike should say something about their marital status and just how they are getting along with their "better half".




So, how was the GS on top of the Stella last year? There were quite a few up there in 2011.
__________________
Dave
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 29 Jan 2013
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Nottingham, UK
Posts: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walkabout View Post
Did you get to the top in 2012, or did the snow drifts stop the bikes?
Didn't quite get to the top because of the snow, had a really blast
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 29 Jan 2013
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Nottingham, UK
Posts: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walkabout View Post
Sorry Jason!
I was the first to go

Back on topic, how did your tourathings perform on the Stella Alpina??
No,No, going of topic is fine, anyway the touratech stuff probably wasn't needed as i didn't drop the bike, up or down.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 29 Jan 2013
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Nottingham, UK
Posts: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Walkabout View Post
I would never ride two up on my XT.
Anywhere, or any distance, and particularly not with the wife on the back (I have to live with her after all).
Incidentally, those who choose to advocate suchlike should say something about their marital status and just how they are getting along with their "better half".




So, how was the GS on top of the Stella last year? There were quite a few up there in 2011.
I'm doing the americas this year with my 1200gsa and Lisa the missus will be on her f650gs. The weight of my bike could be a issue as i intend to ride it on terrain it was designed for but i'm confident i shouldn't have any real problems. I've had it off road before.

Last edited by Jason Spafford; 29 Jan 2013 at 08:04. Reason: spelling
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 29 Jan 2013
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Bern/Switzerland
Posts: 6
Talking Some recommendations

There are a lot of pros and cons about which bike to take for a trip.

For me, a bike has to be
- easy to repair
- lightweight
- good to handle offroad
- robust (nothing gone after a crash)
BMW 12GS -> very comfortable, but NOT really a light bike (better: the old R80G/S), good for most gravel roads, but heavy, mechanically robust, but a lot of stupid electronics
KTM LC8 Adventure: Best offroad bike of the big ones, quite comfortable, very robust, but NOT easy to service (need to have some mechanical skills to change the spark plugs e.g.)
KTM 640 LC4 Adventure: More or less light, very good offroad - but a nightmare for the pillion, "good" vibrations
KTM 690 Enduro: With some mods it would be my choice for the next big trip. Low fuel consumption, light, strong engine.
Yamaha XT 660Z Ténéré: Very good compromise, easy to repair - but needs some mods for the big trip, which are already built in at the KTMs (crash plate, fork springs, rear damper)
BMW F800G/S: Good compromise as well for single riders and with pillion, not too heavy, but would choose it as single rider only

After 30000km last year, the most important things for the next trip for me would be:
- Weight: Take as few luggage (and the lightest) as possible with you
- luggage system: If you're alone, take soft luggage instead of alloy boxes (like Wolfman, Kriega, Enduristan). They don't hurt, when you crash
- Clothes: Rather take a light jacket and some additional layers, than a heavy, all-built-in jacket
- If you have enough time, you can lift up the heaviest bike.

What I want to say: Take your time, it's a journey, not a race

And in every situation, these Two words out of a famous book helped me a lot:

DON'T PANIC

Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 29 Jan 2013
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Nottingham, UK
Posts: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mucho_Gusto_68 View Post
There are a lot of pros and cons about which bike to take for a trip.

For me, a bike has to be
- easy to repair
- lightweight
- good to handle offroad
- robust (nothing gone after a crash)
BMW 12GS -> very comfortable, but NOT really a light bike (better: the old R80G/S), good for most gravel roads, but heavy, mechanically robust, but a lot of stupid electronics
KTM LC8 Adventure: Best offroad bike of the big ones, quite comfortable, very robust, but NOT easy to service (need to have some mechanical skills to change the spark plugs e.g.)
KTM 640 LC4 Adventure: More or less light, very good offroad - but a nightmare for the pillion, "good" vibrations
KTM 690 Enduro: With some mods it would be my choice for the next big trip. Low fuel consumption, light, strong engine.
Yamaha XT 660Z Ténéré: Very good compromise, easy to repair - but needs some mods for the big trip, which are already built in at the KTMs (crash plate, fork springs, rear damper)
BMW F800G/S: Good compromise as well for single riders and with pillion, not too heavy, but would choose it as single rider only

After 30000km last year, the most important things for the next trip for me would be:
- Weight: Take as few luggage (and the lightest) as possible with you
- luggage system: If you're alone, take soft luggage instead of alloy boxes (like Wolfman, Kriega, Enduristan). They don't hurt, when you crash
- Clothes: Rather take a light jacket and some additional layers, than a heavy, all-built-in jacket
- If you have enough time, you can lift up the heaviest bike.

What I want to say: Take your time, it's a journey, not a race

And in every situation, these Two words out of a famous book helped me a lot:

DON'T PANIC

Thanks for your advice
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 29 Jan 2013
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mucho_Gusto_68 View Post
There are a lot of pros and cons about which bike to take for a trip.

For me, a bike has to be
- easy to repair
- lightweight
- good to handle offroad
- robust (nothing gone after a crash)
BMW 12GS -> very comfortable, but NOT really a light bike (better: the old R80G/S), good for most gravel roads, but heavy, mechanically robust, but a lot of stupid electronics
KTM LC8 Adventure: Best offroad bike of the big ones, quite comfortable, very robust, but NOT easy to service (need to have some mechanical skills to change the spark plugs e.g.)
KTM 640 LC4 Adventure: More or less light, very good offroad - but a nightmare for the pillion, "good" vibrations
KTM 690 Enduro: With some mods it would be my choice for the next big trip. Low fuel consumption, light, strong engine.
Yamaha XT 660Z Ténéré: Very good compromise, easy to repair - but needs some mods for the big trip, which are already built in at the KTMs (crash plate, fork springs, rear damper)
BMW F800G/S: Good compromise as well for single riders and with pillion, not too heavy, but would choose it as single rider only

After 30000km last year, the most important things for the next trip for me would be:
- Weight: Take as few luggage (and the lightest) as possible with you
- luggage system: If you're alone, take soft luggage instead of alloy boxes (like Wolfman, Kriega, Enduristan). They don't hurt, when you crash
- Clothes: Rather take a light jacket and some additional layers, than a heavy, all-built-in jacket
- If you have enough time, you can lift up the heaviest bike.

What I want to say: Take your time, it's a journey, not a race

And in every situation, these Two words out of a famous book helped me a lot:

DON'T PANIC

Exactly my thought. But, let me go a little bit deeper.
As someone said on this forum:
-"While on the road, the first thing that you will wish for is less weight, not power, not comfort: less weight!"

In order, what you should look for in a motorcycle should be:
1) Lightweight:
Maximum 170 kilo. You should be able to pick it up and go with it anywhere.
2) Reliability:
Buy a motorcycle that you KNOW will not fail you in the middle of no where. Bring spare parts with you: what other owners say usually fail.
3) Easy to service/repair:
No over-complicate electronic stuff. The bike that you own should be repairable in the most remote workshop with the most simple tool. For instance in a small town in Africa, in old soviet countries or even with a rock (sometime...).
4) Off road capability/ robustness:
If you want to go anywhere&everywhere... you should be able to!
5) Cheap:
Why would you buying a motorcycle worth 20 000 USD? When you can buy one which will do the job (sometime better) for less then 2000 USD? All the money you save when buying your bike, is money that you can spend while travelling. Plus, you won't cry when a part of your fairing has been scratch/fall-down with those.

Some of the bike that, somehow, fit into this are:
-Honda: XR400, 600, 650 ; Old Transalp 600, maybe Africa Twin 650.
-Suzuki: Drz 350, 400, 650.
-Yamaha: xt600z, 660z.
-Kawazaki: KLR650.
-KTM: 640 Adventure (Very reliable after 2003!)
-BMW: R80gs, bmw 650gs(single cylinder one).

Of course, any bike can make the journey, but after the journey is over, you will kind of regret to not have been able to take some small roads because you knew your bike was too heavy/expensive/unreliable/fragile to go there.



Luggage:
-Use soft luggage: cheaper, lighter, won't break if you fall/easily fixable if it breaks (Wolfman pack are great/ Military bag also).
If you are afraid someone will took your stuff: use impermeable cover on them, it make them less desirable, if you are really afraid, use pack-safe net.
-What to put inside your luggage:
Think versatility/flexibility/lightness.
If you definitively need it and won't be able to find it on the road, take it. If you maybe need it but you can buy it on the road: Don't take it.
Do not forget: Tools, Spare parts, duct tape, superglue... and positive attitude in every situation!

Last edited by YGio; 29 Jan 2013 at 20:22.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 29 Jan 2013
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Base Camp - Isle of Man & Portugal
Posts: 4
Post Life Weight

I keep my life weight down to 25kg, even on the big BMWs.
As far as off roading in Africa is concerned - and I shall be honest here in spite of being a life long BMW fan. The BMW GS handles like a Jumbo Jet with flat wheels on rough terrrain fully loaded. (At least the older models give the rider some feedback to the actual conditions of the surface) The new Adventures are being produced with fancy suspension units controlled by a computer making decisions for the rider making it perhaps into a situation whereby the computer replaces experience. A fully loaded bike depending on it's position on a rough track on a hill will be impossible to lift on ones own. Many riders are alone. I have learn't to do my off road riding after I have located my base camp on a main tarred or gravelled route. For off roading I then just carry my survival kit in a back pack.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
rtw, touratech


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


 
 



Renedian Adventures

HU DVD Summer Special!

Now that summer is here, get On the Road! Take 30% off the Achievable Dream - On the Road! 2-DVD set until August 31 only. Get On the Road! Learn the tips to staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure!

Our veteran travellers share their tips (and great stories) for staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure.

"A fantastic, informative and inspirational DVD."

"It's brilliant - thank you very much!"

Check it out at the HU Store! Remember to use Coupon Code 'ONTHEROAD' on your order when you checkout.

What others say about HU...

"I just wanted to say thanks for doing this and sharing so much with the rest of us." Dave, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the DVD series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring! The new look of the website is very impressive, updated and catchy. Thank you so very much!" Jennifer, Canada

"...Great site. Keep up the good work." Murray and Carmen, Australia

"We just finished a 7 month 22,000+ mile scouting trip from Alaska to the bottom of Chile and I can't tell you how many times we referred to your site for help. From how to adjust your valves, to where to stay in the back country of Peru. Horizons Unlimited was a key player in our success. Motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world are in debt to your services." Alaska Riders

contest pic

10th Annual HU Travellers Photo Contest is on now! This is an opportunity for YOU to show us your best photos and win prizes!

NEW! HU 2014 Adventure Travel T-shirts! are now available in several colors! Be the first kid on your block to have them! New lower prices on synths!

HU 2014 T-shirts now in!

Check out the new Gildan Performance cotton-feel t-shirt - 100% poly, feels like soft cotton!


What turns you on to motorcycle travel?


Global Rescue, WORLDwide evacuation services for EVERYONE

Global Rescue is the premier provider of medical, security and evacuation services worldwide and is the only company that will come to you, wherever you are, and evacuate you to your home hospital of choice. Additionally, Global Rescue places no restrictions on country of citizenship - all nationalities are eligible to sign-up!


New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80 G/S motorcycle.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events (22 this year!); we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, the HUBB or to receive the e-zine. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.


Books & DVDs

amazon

All the best travel books and videos listed and often reviewed on HU's famous Books page. Check it out and get great travel books from all over the world.


Motorcycle Express for shipping and insurance!

Motorcycle Express

MC Air Shipping, (uncrated) USA / Canada / Europe and other areas. Be sure to say "Horizons Unlimited" to get your $25 discount on Shipping!
Insurance - see: For foreigners traveling in US and Canada and for Americans and Canadians traveling in other countries, then mail it to MC Express and get your HU $15 discount!




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 17:46.