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  #1  
Old 2 Dec 2009
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Tight spot on newish chain

I have less than 3k miles on my regina chain and I have a mother of a tight spot. Is it time for a new chain and sprockets? Or could I get a little more out of them?

History: I went for a different rear sprocket last time around, and I only just managed to get the shorter chain onto it. I had to push the axel all the way forward and, according to the markers on the swing arm, the axel was slightly out of alignment. Also I had to run the new chain in with less freeplay than specified in the manual. The chain loosened out after 100 miles or so and everything looked ok, until now.

Bike is a KLE500.

Cheers.
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Old 2 Dec 2009
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Shouldn't go that quick. I got 30,000kms from my set on a DR650 before it went.
Maybe using the wrong sized sprockets have knackered it early if it didn't have the right amount of play?
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  #3  
Old 2 Dec 2009
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Having a chain out of allignment and too tight is a surefire way of knackering it before it's time.
Try spraying the chain with WD40 and running it for 10 minutes on the mainstand. The WD40 is so light that it will fling off very quickly while taking and crud off the chain and loosening it up. Then apply a liberal coating of engine oil on the chain and leave it overnight..Making sure the chain is tensioned and adjusted properly.
I used to perform this religiously every week on my old AT and regularly got 20 000 miles out of a chain and sprocket and the AT had a reputation in some circles as a chain eater.
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  #4  
Old 2 Dec 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TommyT View Post
I have less than 3k miles on my regina chain and I have a mother of a tight spot. Is it time for a new chain and sprockets? Or could I get a little more out of them?

History: I went for a different rear sprocket last time around, and I only just managed to get the shorter chain onto it. I had to push the axel all the way forward and, according to the markers on the swing arm, the axel was slightly out of alignment. Also I had to run the new chain in with less freeplay than specified in the manual. The chain loosened out after 100 miles or so and everything looked ok, until now.

Bike is a KLE500.

Cheers.
I investigated the possibility of using a O ring chain with my Enfield. Apparently you can only have O ring chains in even numbers of pitches which constrain I assume caused you to start with a too tight chain.
I also discovered you can get Split links for O ring chains. What I suggest you do is remove the link which is tight as it may well contain a bent pin, and replace that link with either a new link or a split link. Note, if your chain is still tight, it is likely to bend something else again to get the clearance it needs. It might be better to insert two links and then take one out when the chain wears. Much useful info is on the Regina website.
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Old 2 Dec 2009
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Surely an overtight chain would probably damage the gearbox output bearing also.
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Old 2 Dec 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grumpy View Post
Surely an overtight chain would probably damage the gearbox output bearing also.
Too true, an over-tight chain is a BAD thing, and will put undue strain on the output shaft & bearing

In an ideal world, that chain needs to be replaced. In the real world, the advice given by Oldbmw is OK, but you'll need to match the chain exactly & find somewhere that sells chain "off-the-roll". If your chain has stretched too much, the new bit of chain may cause other problems with uneven wear, and wreck the sprockets.

I think you'd be best fitting a new set - but a better make, Afam or Izumi.
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  #7  
Old 2 Dec 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by electric_monk View Post
Try spraying the chain with WD40 and running it for 10 minutes on the mainstand. The WD40 is so light that it will fling off very quickly while taking and crud off the chain and loosening it up. Then apply a liberal coating of engine oil on the chain and leave it overnight.
I'll give that a go.


Quote:
Originally Posted by oldbmw View Post
Apparently you can only have O ring chains in even numbers of pitches which constrain I assume caused you to start with a too tight chain.
I didn't have take any links off the chain, it was 110 links out of the box. I think my bike must be a mutant! You're right about even numbers of o-rings - I made that mistake already.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Pigford View Post
I think you'd be best fitting a new set - but a better make, Afam or Izumi.
I never even heard of Afam or Izum.


Cheers.
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Old 2 Dec 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TommyT View Post

I didn't have take any links off the chain, it was 110 links out of the box. I think my bike must be a mutant! You're right about even numbers of o-rings - I made that mistake already.

Cheers.
I maybe wrong, but I assumed you fitted a new sprocket of a different size.

maybe install a 112 pitch chain, or lengthen the one you have by replacing the tight link with two new links.
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  #9  
Old 3 Dec 2009
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The primary reason for having a tight spot in a chain has nothing to do with the chain itself - it's because the sprockets are out of round, or the mounting holes were drilled off centre.

Check which sprocket is causing the problem - most likely it will be the rear - and replace it. If your chain is not too old, and has covered only 3k miles, it will probably not need replacing.
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  #10  
Old 3 Dec 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldbmw View Post
I maybe wrong, but I assumed you fitted a new sprocket of a different size.

maybe install a 112 pitch chain, or lengthen the one you have by replacing the tight link with two new links.
I did go with a different sized rear sprocket and got an 110 link chain (as opposed to 112), as per manufacturer's spec, but I only just managed to get it on the bike. Similar thing happened with my firend's Transalp - the spec chain was too short. I asked a mechanic in my local bike shop and he says that sometimes happens. In future I'm going to buy longer chains and cut them down.
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  #11  
Old 3 Dec 2009
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Originally Posted by electric_monk View Post
Try spraying the chain with WD40 and running it for 10 minutes on the mainstand. The WD40 is so light that it will fling off very quickly while taking and crud off the chain and loosening it up. Then apply a liberal coating of engine oil on the chain and leave it overnight
That seems to have worked!
Fair play.
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  #12  
Old 3 Dec 2009
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Originally Posted by TommyT View Post
That seems to have worked!
Fair play.
Now, keep doing it every 1000 miles or so and it should last you well.
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