Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > Technical, Bike forums > Tech

Tech ALL bikes: "Generic" tech questions and answers. Maintenance, general discussions etc.
Contact Overland Solutions for all your custom modifications and setup for overland travel.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #31  
Old 10 May 2011
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Australia.
Posts: 669
Quote:
Originally Posted by *Touring Ted* View Post
In reality, who really rides 200 miles and then gets down in the hot sun to clean their chain.
Yeah, I do sadly. Only not in the sun though. It's simple with a bit of help who holds the rear wheel of the ground. Just turn the rear wheel and drop the droplets on the chain. Run the toothbrush over it and you're good as gold. As easy as taking your boots off.

Do have to say that I removed the counter sprocket cover which just builds up gunk. Will also remove the chain guide once I've finished my build.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 10 May 2011
*Touring Ted*'s Avatar
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Wirral, England.
Posts: 4,384
Quote:
Originally Posted by tmotten View Post
Yeah, I do sadly. Only not in the sun though. It's simple with a bit of help who holds the rear wheel of the ground. Just turn the rear wheel and drop the droplets on the chain. Run the toothbrush over it and you're good as gold. As easy as taking your boots off.

Do have to say that I removed the counter sprocket cover which just builds up gunk. Will also remove the chain guide once I've finished my build.
You're a better man than me !!
__________________
www.TouringTed.com
1994 XR650L
2001 NX650 Dominator.

BMW Dealer Technician
Welder/Fabricator

Ushuaia - Colombia 2007/8
UK- South Africa 2010/11
India 2012
Yukon 2012
S.E Asia 2014
U.K - Magadan 2015
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 10 May 2011
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Australia.
Posts: 669


It's more a case of hating with a passion dealing with chains and sprockets. In particular road side. That and tyres. I rather stand on the side of the road with a soldering iron fixing my own crap electrical connections. Luckily that is something you get better at. Chains and tyres will always be a PITA.
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 10 May 2011
MikeS's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: KL, Malaysia
Posts: 1,145
I'm the same, actually found it quite therapeutic cleaning my chain with kerosene and a toothbrush with the bike propped up on the walking stick every few days...got 30,000kms out of the chain so like to think it helped prolong the chain/sprockets life which was a good job as I didn't find any replacements until I actually really needed them.
__________________
Mike


www.singapore-scotland.blogspot.com
www.argentina-alaska.blogspot.com
My little Vid: India/Pakistan

BMW R1150GS
Suzuki DR650 SE: Ride it like ya stole it. Oh, somebody just did...
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 10 May 2011
Super Moderator
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: bellingham, WA, USA
Posts: 1,968
30,000 km = 18,000 miles = normal life of a good chain even if you leave the toothbrush behind (unless you coat it with something sticky before riding on sand or dirt, in which case it won't last that long).

Although: mileage varies....but you knew that.

Of course if it's therapy you're after, well, who am I to interfere? I get mine elsewhere, and it involves neither toothbrush nor kerosene.

Mark
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 10 May 2011
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Australia.
Posts: 669
Problem is that new chains also have some of the pin grease on the rings. This will create some sticky business on itself.

I usually end up wearing the front sprocket before the chain goes. Who swaps the front sprocket halfway through the chain life? Or when the teeth start to look worn an hooked? Wonder if this really does increase chain wear.
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 10 May 2011
Super Moderator
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: bellingham, WA, USA
Posts: 1,968
I swap sprockets when they look fairly worn. This is never once per chain; more often once per two chains (front or rear or both). Doesn't seem to cut into my chain life, despite all the theory which says it should.

If you're really changing out a front sprocket in less time than your chain wears out, you're definitely doing something different from me. What do you think? How many miles/km to wear out a front sprocket? Why so fast?

As for the grease slathered all over a new chain: yep, until the first wash with WD40. In fact, maybe that's what I'm really doing with my spray cleaning: I'm washing off the grinding paste which otherwise eats sprockets. That would go a long way towards explaining why I always seem to go two chains per set of sprockets, minimum.

Or not: what do I know? It's just a theory.

Mark
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 15 Oct 2011
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Australia
Posts: 35
I recently met a bloke in outback South Australia who used an XR as a scout vehicle when taking heavy machinery to remote areas. The chain on the bike was rusty as hell and I joked about it needing a quick lube. He said he'd never use any type of lube on his chain because it picks up all the dust and sand and grinds it away, as many people here have said. He reckons just putting it on and leaving it alone gets him the most out of it.

I don't think we'll ever all agree on whether WD40 is good to use or not, but kerosene or paraffin (or maybe engine oil / ATF) seems the best option to me. Years ago all anybody did was soak the chains in engine oil and wipe off the excess and it seemed to work for them.
Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 16 Oct 2011
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: derbyshire
Posts: 101
I concur with what Markharf has said. Run the chain dry and forget about it.

I rode to Morocco and back, riding on sand and trails then back at home for a while. I may of adjusted it once in a while but other than that ran it dry.

Now back home I never oil my chains on both my XT or my XR trail bike, just use WD-40 to clean them.

I have noticed no real difference between the longevity of an oiled chain as opposed a dry chain, but then like others I don't log it or anything. The only difference is the noise- a dry chain clatters a bit, but as far as I can see this does no harm and you soon get used to it.

Get a good quality x-ring chain and run it dry is my advice.

Dan
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 12 Mar 2012
Gold Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: UK but on the road in NZ now
Posts: 213
Baja

We arrived in Baja in time for the Baja 1000 race, I talked to several desert racers and dirt bike riders and they all said to clean the chain with kerosene and run them dry in sand.

I carried on using my trusty PJ1 Blue label though and cleaned the chain when back on the pavement - to be honest how much sand are you going to be doing in the life of a chain!

Paul

www.twobikesrunnibg.co.uk
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Sand in the UK? henryuk Travellers' questions that don't fit anywhere else 12 10 Jan 2011 21:59
driving in sand, picking up dropped bike in sand? monkii Sahara Travel Forum 2 31 May 2007 04:57
sand ladders bernardo feio lightweight 4WD Overland Tech 25 8 Jun 2004 19:21
Sand! Sam Rutherford Sahara Travel Forum 0 7 Jan 2003 22:02
Chain spray/chain wax FredXTZ Yamaha Tech 1 5 Sep 2002 02:21

 
 


HU DVD Summer Special!

Now that summer is here, get On the Road! Take 30% off the Achievable Dream - On the Road! 2-DVD set until August 31 only. Get On the Road! Learn the tips to staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure!

Our veteran travellers share their tips (and great stories) for staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure.

"A fantastic, informative and inspirational DVD."

"It's brilliant - thank you very much!"

Check it out at the HU Store! Remember to use Coupon Code 'ONTHEROAD' on your order when you checkout.


Renedian Adventures

What others say about HU...

"I just wanted to say thanks for doing this and sharing so much with the rest of us." Dave, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the DVD series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring! The new look of the website is very impressive, updated and catchy. Thank you so very much!" Jennifer, Canada

"...Great site. Keep up the good work." Murray and Carmen, Australia

"We just finished a 7 month 22,000+ mile scouting trip from Alaska to the bottom of Chile and I can't tell you how many times we referred to your site for help. From how to adjust your valves, to where to stay in the back country of Peru. Horizons Unlimited was a key player in our success. Motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world are in debt to your services." Alaska Riders

contest pic

10th Annual HU Travellers Photo Contest is on now! This is an opportunity for YOU to show us your best photos and win prizes!

NEW! HU 2014 Adventure Travel T-shirts! are now available in several colors! Be the first kid on your block to have them! New lower prices on synths!

HU 2014 T-shirts now in!

Check out the new Gildan Performance cotton-feel t-shirt - 100% poly, feels like soft cotton!


What turns you on to motorcycle travel?


Global Rescue, WORLDwide evacuation services for EVERYONE

Global Rescue is the premier provider of medical, security and evacuation services worldwide and is the only company that will come to you, wherever you are, and evacuate you to your home hospital of choice. Additionally, Global Rescue places no restrictions on country of citizenship - all nationalities are eligible to sign-up!


New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80 G/S motorcycle.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events (22 this year!); we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, the HUBB or to receive the e-zine. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.


Books & DVDs

amazon

All the best travel books and videos listed and often reviewed on HU's famous Books page. Check it out and get great travel books from all over the world.


Motorcycle Express for shipping and insurance!

Motorcycle Express

MC Air Shipping, (uncrated) USA / Canada / Europe and other areas. Be sure to say "Horizons Unlimited" to get your $25 discount on Shipping!
Insurance - see: For foreigners traveling in US and Canada and for Americans and Canadians traveling in other countries, then mail it to MC Express and get your HU $15 discount!




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:11.