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sub-Saharan Africa Topics specific to sub-Saharan Africa. (Includes all countries South of 17 degrees latitude)
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  #1  
Old 19 Feb 2014
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Safest way to Ndjamena [and across Chad to Sudan]

The safest way to Ndjamena is through Cameroon.
Ngaoundere-Touboro-Moundou then all the way up to Ndjamena.
I crossed there middle of January 2014 and it was easy and safe all the way to Al junaynah in western Sudan, from there I had to ship my motorbike and fly to Khartoum because of the security issues in Western Darfur.
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[Across Chad to Sudan]-dfgn.jpg  

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  #2  
Old 20 Feb 2014
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Did you write a more detailed report somewhere about that part of your trip ? How did the air shipping to Khartoum go to bypass Darfur and how much did you pay ? Would also be fantastic so see some photos, as far as I know this is a very unusual route that could interest quite some folks out there !

cheers,
Chris
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  #3  
Old 24 Feb 2014
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris.perjalanan View Post
Did you write a more detailed report somewhere about that part of your trip ? How did the air shipping to Khartoum go to bypass Darfur and how much did you pay ? Would also be fantastic so see some photos, as far as I know this is a very unusual route that could interest quite some folks out there !

cheers,
Chris
Hi Chris,

The shipping from Al Junaynah to Khartoum was so easy and reasonably priced (£50 for a big bike & £100 for me). I got in touch with the shipping agent and arranged everything, then headed to the airport and they took the bike into the cargo plane. The bike was delivered to Khartoum airport that night and it was waiting for me there the next day without a single scratch!. That was for the bike, then I booked a flight from Al Junaynah to Khartoum going out the next morning. It was 1.5 hours flight (Badr airlines) and it was like flying with any airline, (Boeing 737) it was comfortable and very secure. Al Junaynah airport is a small airport, but the security is very tight. Al Junaynah itself is safe just don't wonder about on the outskirts at night. People in Darfur were courteous and very helpful.

Chad was very safe from the entry point at Touboro to Moundou (good tarmac), Kelo, Bongor, Ndjamena (bad tarmac keep your eyes on the so many potholes), Massaguet, Ngoura (not bad tarmac) then (No don't go to Ati from Ngoura because the road is horrendous although they are working on it, I went that way and dropped the bike many times on the deep sand! and had to turn around and go the other way) instead head South to Bokoro, Bitkine, (fantastic tarmac my FZ6 loved it) then North east to Mongo and then 130km of good piste to Mangalme (they are working on that stretch of road), then to Oum Hadjer and Abeche (very good and some ok bits).
From Abeche to Adre the road is just really bad, 175km of stones. Stones every where and deeep sand but only on flood streams (don't go there in the rainy season). The piste from Adre to Al Junaynah is good.

In Adre I got arrested by the Chadian army. They said that people reporting a man on a strange looking bike (First report was in Oum Hadjer!!). That was Friday 17/01/2014 and they asked me so many questions over and over again. They kept my passport. They even took me to the governors headquarters because he wanted to see this biker!.

After the governor asked me the same questions again and going through my passport he said everything was in order and they are not arresting me they just want to keep me here until more info and orders come from Ndjamena. They took me back to the police station where I had to spend the night there, slept there near their offices next to my motorbike (which they locked with chains in case I might do a runner at night!!)
I was allowed to go in the afternoon of 18/01/2014.

I must say here that Chadian army and police were very kind and helpful to me and were chatting to me all my time there. One of the soldiers told me that they arrested me because people probably haven't seen strange bikes before!!

I didn't have carnet de passage. No body asks for it, and when they did at the Cameroon border with Nigeria I said the UK government don't issue it any more and they let me go and never been asked about it all the way through Cameroon. At the Chadian border I was asked again about it..and again I said I don't have it so they issued me with a one page document for the bike for free and no one asked for it throughout Chad or when exiting.

I had motorbike insurance, but no one was bothered to ask if I had one!!

No one is bothered to ask about the yellow fever card either.

In Africa if you have no documents don't say you don't have them say you lost them or they were stolen along with some of your money.

For the whole of this trip from the UK to Sudan going through 12 countries I would say 99.99% of people, army and police were very helpful and kind...fall off the bike and locals will pick you up (Dropped the bike so many times and never picked it up alone, there was always someone there to help.), ask for directions, shops, petrol and they will help you they even invite you to spend the night at their homes!.
Attached Thumbnails
[Across Chad to Sudan]-p1030774.jpg  

[Across Chad to Sudan]-p1030811.jpg  

[Across Chad to Sudan]-p1030844.jpg  


Last edited by schenkel; 3 Weeks Ago at 00:18.
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  #4  
Old 24 Feb 2014
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Originally Posted by schenkel View Post
Hi Chris,

The shipping from Al Junaynah to Khartoum was so easy and reasonably priced (£50 for a big bike & £100 for me). I got in touch with the shipping agent and arranged everything, then headed to the airport and they took the bike into the cargo plane. The bike was delivered to Khartoum airport that night and it was waiting for me there the next day without a single scratch!. That was for the bike, then I booked a flight from Al Junaynah to Khartoum going out the next morning. It was 1.5 hours flight (Badr airlines) and it was like flying with any airline, (Boeing 737) it was comfortable and very secure. Al Junaynah airport is a small airport, but the security is very tight. Al Junaynah itself is safe just don't wonder about on the outskirts at night. People in Darfur were courteous and very helpful.

Chad was very safe from the entry point at Touboro to Moundou (good tarmac), Kelo, Bongor, Ndjamena (bad tarmac keep your eyes on the so many potholes), Massaguet, Ngoura (not bad tarmac) then (No don't go to Ati from Ngoura because the road is horrendous although they are working on it, I went that way and dropped the bike many times on the deep sand! and had to turn around and go the other way) instead head South to Bokoro, Bitkine, (fantastic tarmac my FZ6 loved it) then North east to Mongo and then 130km of good piste to Mangalme (they are working on that stretch of road), then to Oum Hadjer and Abeche (very good and some ok bits).
From Abeche to Adre the road is just really bad, 175km of stones. Stones every where and deeep sand but only on flood streams (don't go there in the rainy season). The piste from Adre to Al Junaynah is good.

In Adre I got arrested by the Chadian army. They said that people reporting a man on a strange looking bike (First report was in Oum Hadjer!!). That was Friday 17/01/2013 and they asked me so many questions over and over again. They kept my passport. They even took me to the governors headquarters because he wanted to see this biker!.

After the governor asked me the same questions again and going through my passport he said everything was in order and they are not arresting me they just want to keep me here until more info and orders come from Ndjamena. They took me back to the police station where I had to spend the night there, slept there near their offices next to my motorbike (which they locked with chains in case I might do a runner at night!!)
I was allowed to go in the afternoon of 18/01/2013.

I must say here that Chadian army and police were very kind and helpful to me and were chatting to me all my time there. One of the soldiers told me that they arrested me because people probably haven't seen strange bikes before!!

I didn't have carnet de passage. No body asks for it, and when they did at the Cameroon border with Nigeria I said the UK government don't issue it any more and they let me go and never been asked about it all the way through Cameroon. At the Chadian border I was asked again about it..and again I said I don't have it so they issued me with a one page document for the bike for free and no one asked for it throughout Chad or when exiting.

I had motorbike insurance, but no one was bothered to ask if I had one!!

No one is bothered to ask about the yellow fever card either.

In Africa if you have no documents don't say you don't have them say you lost them or they were stolen along with some of your money.

For the whole of this trip from the UK to Sudan going through 12 countries I would say 99.99% of people, army and police were very helpful and kind...fall off the bike and locals will pick you up (Dropped the bike so many times and never picked it up alone, there was always someone there to help.), ask for directions, shops, petrol and they will help you they even invite you to spend the night at their homes!.
What a great and inspiring read! Can't wait to drive this road someday
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  #5  
Old 24 Feb 2014
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Sorry for the mix up of dates, the trip across Chad was in January 2014. I have amended the post.
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  #6  
Old 24 Feb 2014
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Were you forced to fly across Darfur, or did you make the decision?

Just thinking what would happen if one arrived in a 4x4...
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  #7  
Old 24 Feb 2014
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I was not forced to fly across Darfur, But locals, army and police made it very clear to me that I will definitely get in some sort of deep trouble or death if I continue on the road.
If I was on a 4x4 I would probably wait for the armed convoy to take me to the next safe city.
People still use the road, and transport still running with no problems it is just some rebels targeting trucks, goods and solo drivers and riders.

Last edited by schenkel; 3 Weeks Ago at 00:18.
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  #8  
Old 22 Mar 2014
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Thanks for opening up a new west to east route schenkel, well done. But just to add a little detail, schenkel is actually Sudanese and is muslim and speaks arabic which I'm sure has aided his transition. On the other hand, doing this on a yamaha FZ6 is just bad ass. You're a pioneer my friend.
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Old 23 Mar 2014
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Originally Posted by Titbird View Post
Thanks for opening up a new west to east route schenkel, well done. But just to add a little detail, schenkel is actually Sudanese and is muslim and speaks arabic which I'm sure has aided his transition. On the other hand, doing this on a yamaha FZ6 is just bad ass. You're a pioneer my friend.

Hello Titbird
Thanks. I am very happy that you made it back home safely, It was pleasure knowing you mate. Thanks again for everything.
You're right being all those did help but only in some countries like Morocco, Mauritania and of course Sudan (and that was for speaking Arabic and talking to everyone in a lingo they understood) but they made things difficult in Chad and didn't help in all other countries on route. What made things a bit easy everywhere was having a British passport. Showing the Sudanese passport in Chad was a huge mistake and caused me a lot of hassle. I think being a Muslim or Christian has no effect at all because most of the people who go round Africa on bikes are Europeans or white and automatically looked at as Christians, and that was never an issue in all of Africa (excluding the places even I wouldn't dare to go to i.e. Northern Nigeria).
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Old 7 Aug 2014
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Hi guys. How would you think about doing something like this without own tranpost (so public transports or whatever) for a white european traveller? Possible? Safe? I´d be in Western Africa, looking for a way to Sudan. More overland I can is better, so would love the idea of making it all overland except for the airplane from Al Junaynah to Khartoum. Thanks
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