Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > Planning, Trip > Staying Healthy on the Road

Staying Healthy on the Road Medical info, e.g. malaria, vaccinations, travel medical tips, medical insurance, where to find a doctor.
Contact Overland Solutions for all your custom modifications and setup for overland travel.

Global Rescue, WORLDwide evacuation services for EVERYONE to YOUR choice of home hospital


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 26 Sep 2008
Forsellini's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Columbia, MO usa
Posts: 102
Thoughts on high altitude sickness

Crossing Paso de Jama is around 15000 feet with about 180 miles between towns. Should that be considered risky for travelers? Anyone know about the altitudes leading to Cuzco?
Thanks
Bob
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 26 Sep 2008
beddhist's Avatar
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Whangarei, NZ
Posts: 2,225
Assuming the road is sealed and the towns are below 2500m altitude you will be safe. At worst you risk a headache on the way down.
__________________
Cheers,
Peter.

Europe to NZ 2006-10
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 26 Sep 2008
mollydog's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: california
Posts: 2,174
The good news riding your bike is that you will climb gradually

Last edited by mollydog; 26 Mar 2009 at 19:23.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 27 Sep 2008
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 739
Hey Forsellini,

Ditto to the you should be ok comments. A rough rule of thumb is that at 13,000 feet you start watching altitudes and how you feel. Above that height, it is suggested that you only ascend as little as 1,000 feet per day to allow your body time to acclimatize. That is hiking of course so on a bike the bad thing is that you can ascend way above that quickly but you can also descend before you are exposed to those altitudes for too long of a period. 180 miles is pretty short, you'll be through there pretty quick. Keep in mind that climb high, sleep low is something that all mountaineers follow. You expose your body to a higher altitude, that kicks the body into gear and you descend lower to sleep.

It depends on where you are coming from and the altitude you have been exposed to before you get there, but in general you should be fine. I would say that there is a very high probability that you will get altitude sickness (eg, headache, loss of appetite, insomnia) but not AMS (acute mountain sickness) of which the less ideal symptoms are pulmonary edema or cerebral edema (bleeding in the lungs or brain). You can die from those later things, but just be aware they exist. For most people, they won't be affected but I have seen a few people whose physiology simply didn't adapt to altitude very well and had to descend. That is the miracle cure if you are one of those rare people, you will feel it and you can just descend.

Have fun, I'm sure it'll be a beautiful ride.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 27 Sep 2008
Forsellini's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Columbia, MO usa
Posts: 102
Thanks for the thoughts

Molly/Mountain
Sounds like good advice!
Thanks
Bob
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 27 Sep 2008
Tim Cullis's Avatar
Moderator
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Putney, SW London
Posts: 1,338
Different people react in differing degrees, I am quite susceptable to altitude.

I flew in from sea level at Lima to Juliaca and found I had real dizzyness problems in the airport building. But after a week or so acclimatising I did the Inca Trail at 4200m. Cuzco was around 3500m I think.

The good news is that you get tipsy on the smallest amount of alcohol!

Timm
__________________
"For sheer delight there is nothing like altitude; it gives one the thrill of adventure
and enlarges the world in which you live,"
Irving Mather (1892-1966)

Access the Morocco Knowledgebase
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 27 Sep 2008
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Danmark
Posts: 330
Quote:
Originally Posted by mollydog View Post
......... I recommend eating some good hard candy as you climb. The Candy idea came from a local Peruvian business man who lived in Lima but traveled into the Andes for work several times a year. On the train they offered Oxygen. I never used it, never felt sick. Just ate a couple pieces of Candy and was fine.
.........
The advice from MountainMan and beddhist is sound advice, but please don't tell anyone they can avoid AMS with candy! As already said, AMS can be deadly if not understood.

PS: for the record, oedema/edema is liquid build up, not bleeding, but in the brain or lungs, it will kill you anyway.
Oedema Introduction - Health encyclopaedia - NHS Direct
__________________
Poul
May you enjoy peace and good health !
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 28 Sep 2008
DLbiten's Avatar
HU California Meeting Organiser
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Camano is. USA
Posts: 443
Take your time and you may be ok. I got altitude sickness at around 13,500 feet on hike up pikes peak not any fun. Puking, tired, stumbiling around. Good thing is the fix is easy gust go down a few 1,000 feet and rest. If you have the time take a few days for the run and spend some time up there. if you smoke try to little of that. Go for little walks rest often helps the body to ajust. Dont do what I did and push your self.

The candy was was probably to off set the body's burning of caleroies, more fule on the fier so to speak. Wont stop you from getting sick water wont just help with the symptoms.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 28 Sep 2008
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Salisbury UK
Posts: 248
Quote:
Originally Posted by DLbiten View Post
...I got altitude sickness at around 13,500 feet on hike up pikes peak not any fun...
I think I had it just driving over the Alps. It was the mother of all headaches (painkillers didn't touch it) and I felt sick and light-headed. Reminded me of a really bad hangover. I just put it down to tiredness and not drinking enough water. When I got down to the flat, I drank lots more water with some more painkillers and had a nap - which helped a bit. I thought this only happened to mountain climbers. I'm reading now that some people are more prone than others and it could even be dangerous.
__________________
I've a feeling I'm not in Kansas anymore.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 28 Sep 2008
mollydog's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: california
Posts: 2,174
Most overland MC travelers will have been at altitude before they arrive in Peru'

Last edited by mollydog; 26 Mar 2009 at 19:24.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Need advice for high altitude Forsellini South America 6 4 Oct 2008 22:02
XT600e Altitude Sickness dionysos Yamaha Tech 11 12 Sep 2007 18:30
no altitude sickness on a bike ? vincent danna Travellers' questions that don't fit anywhere else 12 19 Dec 2005 21:33
High Altitude Driving ashuatwal BMW Tech 0 8 Aug 2003 05:54
High altitude tuning Bolton Wanderer BMW Tech 2 24 Sep 2002 05:41

 
 


HU DVD Summer Special!

Now that summer is here, get On the Road! Take 30% off the Achievable Dream - On the Road! 2-DVD set until August 31 only. Get On the Road! Learn the tips to staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure!

Our veteran travellers share their tips (and great stories) for staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure.

"A fantastic, informative and inspirational DVD."

"It's brilliant - thank you very much!"

Check it out at the HU Store! Remember to use Coupon Code 'ONTHEROAD' on your order when you checkout.


Renedian Adventures


Renedian Adventures

What others say about HU...

"I just wanted to say thanks for doing this and sharing so much with the rest of us." Dave, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the DVD series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring! The new look of the website is very impressive, updated and catchy. Thank you so very much!" Jennifer, Canada

"...Great site. Keep up the good work." Murray and Carmen, Australia

"We just finished a 7 month 22,000+ mile scouting trip from Alaska to the bottom of Chile and I can't tell you how many times we referred to your site for help. From how to adjust your valves, to where to stay in the back country of Peru. Horizons Unlimited was a key player in our success. Motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world are in debt to your services." Alaska Riders

contest pic

10th Annual HU Travellers Photo Contest is on now! This is an opportunity for YOU to show us your best photos and win prizes!

NEW! HU 2014 Adventure Travel T-shirts! are now available in several colors! Be the first kid on your block to have them! New lower prices on synths!

HU 2014 T-shirts now in!

Check out the new Gildan Performance cotton-feel t-shirt - 100% poly, feels like soft cotton!


What turns you on to motorcycle travel?


Global Rescue, WORLDwide evacuation services for EVERYONE

Global Rescue is the premier provider of medical, security and evacuation services worldwide and is the only company that will come to you, wherever you are, and evacuate you to your home hospital of choice. Additionally, Global Rescue places no restrictions on country of citizenship - all nationalities are eligible to sign-up!


New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80 G/S motorcycle.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events (22 this year!); we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, the HUBB or to receive the e-zine. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.


Books & DVDs

amazon

All the best travel books and videos listed and often reviewed on HU's famous Books page. Check it out and get great travel books from all over the world.


Motorcycle Express for shipping and insurance!

Motorcycle Express

MC Air Shipping, (uncrated) USA / Canada / Europe and other areas. Be sure to say "Horizons Unlimited" to get your $25 discount on Shipping!
Insurance - see: For foreigners traveling in US and Canada and for Americans and Canadians traveling in other countries, then mail it to MC Express and get your HU $15 discount!




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:57.