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View Poll Results: Food Forum?
Yes - I want to know! 47 71.21%
Yes - I have lots to contribute! 7 10.61%
No - what's to figure out? 3 4.55%
No - A thread or two is enough. 9 13.64%
Voters: 66. This poll is closed

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  #1  
Old 21 May 2010
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Recipes / food / tips for eating on the road?

Hi Grant,
not sure if this has been covered elsewhere.

how about a new forum for recipes/cooking tips ? - we all have to eat and getting new ideas for different food on the road is always welcome

I guess it would have to be specified that its not about stoves/cookware as this is covered in equipment reviews etc - but the recipes/food itself.

What do you think ?
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Last edited by Gipper; 23 May 2010 at 17:53.
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  #2  
Old 21 May 2010
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Must have Items

1. Curry powder
2. Tabaso sauce
3. Salt & Pepper
4. Red & Brown sauce
5. Worrrrrestestshire Sauce

the above can be used hide/discuise some unedable or reconisable foods that you can see and find on the roadside cafes.

(Flat meat/roadkill anybody) To long in HM Forces me thinks..

Oneworld Biker..

To old to die young.. To young to care....
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  #3  
Old 21 May 2010
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Rather than a specific recipe, I will give a general purpose method.
All quantities are approximate. use what you got.
I carry tins for emergencies or quick meals and use fresh stuff when camping conditions are pleasant.

You need a stove that will simmer and a sandwich bottomed pot that spreads the heat evenly. Not a light thin high tech jobbie, but a supermarket special.

Prepare all meat and veggies prior to cooking.
Put enough oil or duck/goose fat in pot to gently 'sweat' ie make translucent without browning a hand full of chopped onions/shallots/leeks.
add meat cut into approximate 1 1/4inch (32mm ) cubes (lumps).
stir to blanch and seal the meat.
At this stage if you add two heaped teaspoonfuls of curry powder you making a curry. if not you are making a stew. Stir for one minute.
add one tin chopped tomatoes or generous handful of chopped fresh ones.
add chopped vegetables which you have, such as carrots, parsnips, swede, squash and potatoes. cover mixture with water (up to one pint, 600 ML) into which one stock cube has been dissolved.
bring to boil and simmer gently for 40 minutes.
In last ten minutes add any soft veggies such as green beans or peas.

enjoy.

Quicky for two people ....

Do the onions as before. add the curry powder.
add one can small potatoes ( drain the water off first)
stir about
add one can chopped tomatoes
stir about.
bring to boil then switch to simmer
make depressions in the mixture and break in an egg into each depression. two eggs per person.
fit lid steam gently until eggs are fully poached.
You might fancy sprinkling a small can of petite pois in the pot to warm through before serving

Last edited by oldbmw; 30 Jun 2010 at 22:04.
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  #4  
Old 14 Jun 2010
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new book....

hi - after 7 years on the road and 69 countries so far...and having cooked through most of them (!) I thought I'd produce a motorcyclist's over-landing cookbook!
I also love cooking but the recipes included are basic, to medium basic using staple food supplies that most motorcyclists tend to take with them...and a few hints and ideas as to extras to carry and why.
There are also ideas for dishes to cook country specific...not all 69 countries though - that makes the book too big!

This is being proofed at the moment and will be up for sale via our website sometime in the next 2 months! I will let you all know in the vendors bit when its out!

cheers
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  #5  
Old 14 Jun 2010
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Thread yes, but Forum no I think. There hasn't been much on this thread, so not enough interest for a forum it seems. I've moved this thread to the "Staying Healthy" forum.

Anyone has any comments, tips, ideas?

DO we want a forum for food?
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  #6  
Old 14 Jun 2010
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there are plenty of websites/resources dealing with 'simple/local cooking'. I don't think there's anything specific to motorbikes about it.

cooking eggs on your landy bonnet, or fermenting wine on the back of your bicycle, seasoning pasta with tyre rubber shavings, or using old engine oil as a base stock.. then yeah, I could see the motorbike/overland tie in.

otherwise wouldn't it just be a duplication of content cut/pasted from recipe websites ?
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  #7  
Old 14 Jun 2010
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Grant, it would be nice to be able to find the breadmaking thread and Matt's videos in one forum. It could include the "what cooker" threads too.
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  #8  
Old 15 Jun 2010
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If anything, add a word about food in the description for the Staying Healthy on the Road forum. I think we have enough dedicated forums already.
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  #9  
Old 15 Jun 2010
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Everyone has a different style regards lifestyle on the road. I don't cook traveling on the bike ... On some trips I may carry Tea or Coffee. Some travelers love to cook for themselves, only want to eat what they know ... just like home! They don't mind the additional gear, the prep time, clean up in the dark, and the packing away next day.

Not how I roll.

I prefer immersion in local culture when possible. Learn what they eat, observe how they cook, maybe even share a meal. Perhaps pick up a few more words of local language? Will it be awful sometimes? You betcha. Part of life. But most times its pretty good. I learned you have to eat when the locals eat and when things are hopping. In much of Latin America this means you should eat early ... or you won't be eating at all. In Argentina, in means midnight. Get used to it and roll with it. Sadly, fast food is chaning everything, breaking down cultures.

In Ecuador I got a first hand lesson on preparing Qui from a Quechua family. In Ethiopia learned how to make Ingera (sp), a popular staple made from Millet. (never liked it ... looks and tastes like a 20 year old Green Carpet pad.

As a kids we learned to try everything offered, so I'm fairly open to eating weird things: Like deep fried Scorpions and other bugs and worms sold in the markets in Cambodia or Sweet Breads in Mexico and Argentina (Brains), or unknown stews simmering in local markets in Ghana ... stuff 95% of tourists would never touch, and even Anthony Bourdaine might balk at. I love that guy.

Sure, I got sick from time to time, Montezuma is always there waiting to dance with you at the Porcelain alter. You will get sick no matter what you do. But once your system adapts to local bacteria you'll likely be OK. Or not. Then you'll die. Best Stay home then!

With poor planing you may end up middle of nowhere, then I suppose carrying cooking stuff and food makes sense. I rarely camp outside the USA. Don't like to be stuck "guarding" the camp and all my precious stuff while being eaten alive by Mosquitos or robbed at knife point, awakened by grazing Cows at 4am or flooded out by a flash flood.

Even in remote areas I try to make it somewhere populated enough to have a restaurant, store or public market, or at least where a family might take you in and cook for you. But then ... I've never crossed the Sahara where towns are few and far between.

Some travelers carry cans of Sardines, Tuna or Salmon with them, and Saltine crackers. Like Homeless people. They actually considered this a GOOD MEAL and would eat in their room or tent rather than go to town to look around for a decent, cheap restaurant and a cold Beer. Different strokes I guess, but what this leads to is isolation and alienation.

I'd ask if they'd ever eaten a Saltena (Bolivian Emanada), House made Tamales, Ricotto Relleno (Peru'), Empanada, Alote' (grilled Corn w/Lime and Chili) Roasted Qui (Guinea Pig) or BBQ Beef heart cooked on a small Hibachi on the street (yummm!)

Most had no idea what I was talking about or didn't care ... and weren't thrilled with eating in a public markets or off the street with the Peasants. Too dangerous for them. Many seemed to survive solely on tinned food, Rice & Beans, eggs and soup (canned).

I enjoy the plethora of fresh fruits and fresh squeezed juices available. So many travelers would never even try something they'd never seen or tasted. Like Durian fruit (Guanabanana) or other exotics. Some I met had never eaten Papaya, Mangos, Tamarindo, Guava, or even Pineapple ... not interested.
But Tomatoes and Onions seemed popular. With Tuna! Please breath the other way!
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  #10  
Old 15 Jun 2010
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dont fully agree....

Hi Mickey D
well..I agree with some of what you say..immersion in local culture..is the reason we all travel surely? and experiencing the local cuisine is a huge part of our enjoyment in our travels...however...
to cook for oneself does not necessarily mean that you "only want to eat what they know ... just like home!" what it can mean is that you have been on the road a long long time, money is in short supply and more often than not you feel like you need to experience a little normality. for me that means dong some cooking. Usually local food and produce and local recipes. But the actual process of buying, prepping, cooking etc. can help in this respect and can be therapeutic.

Eating 'out' everyday does in itself become tedious if you have been on the road a long period of time; some people experience this after even a short time on the road.

You state " With poor planing you may end up middle of nowhere",then I suppose carrying cooking stuff and food makes sense" nope! ending up in the middle of nowhere is usually a deliberate intention of many travelers that we have met whilst on the road and not due to poor planning....but then you summed up why your opinions are as they are with this statement " I rarely camp outside the USA". and "...... I've never crossed the Sahara where towns are few and far between".

I think the type of thread that is being talked about here is for travelers who do go distances and are keen to explore the remote areas of the World where even one mud hut is a rare but welcoming site but where it is impossible to find a family who "might take you in and cook for you". This is perhaps a slightly naive and presumptuous perspective. For most travellers we all know that this does happen but expecting it so you don't have to cook for yourself is....??

Its not just about the fact that you don't want to eat out but there is a sense of reward from being completely self-sufficient and there is also a lot of commonsense to having a small stock of emergency rations.

this is what would be helpful, interesting and possibly life-saving for some travelers who have absolutely no idea what to take, why they should take it and when they have it what on earth should they do with it!
yes..amazingly there are people out there who know how to strip down a motorcycle and put it back together but who don't know how to boil and egg or make an omlette.

at the end of the day ' each to his own' - there is no right or wrong way to eat or prep food when you travel. this thread/part of the forum would be about those who do want to cook for themselves as and when the mood takes them.

Grant and Chris....as a side note I'm not too sure the 'staying healthy on the road' part of the forum would be the correct place for this particular topic sharing?
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  #11  
Old 15 Jun 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mickey D View Post
With poor planing you may end up middle of nowhere, then I suppose carrying cooking stuff and food makes sense. I rarely camp outside the USA. Don't like to be stuck "guarding" the camp and all my precious stuff while being eaten alive by Mosquitos or robbed at knife point, awakened by grazing Cows at 4am or flooded out by a flash flood.


People are different.
For me it's not poor planning to end up in the middle of nowhere. Nothing beats the feeling to sleep under the starts in a totally quiet desert for the third night at row, or to listen to all the noises in the rainforest at night. There are a lot of remote places where food (and maybe water) is not available for a few days.

If possible I eat local food, it's interesting and usually it tastes better then the food I make myself. Injera is nice as long as it doesn't contain raw meat.
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  #12  
Old 15 Jun 2010
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Originally Posted by Lisa Thomas View Post
I thought I'd produce a motorcyclist's over-landing cookbook!
Brilliant idea. Can't wait to see it.
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  #13  
Old 29 Jun 2010
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Originally Posted by oneworldbiker View Post
Must have Items

1. Curry powder
2. Tabaso sauce
3. Salt & Pepper
4. Red & Brown sauce
5. Worrrrrestestshire Sauce

the above can be used hide/discuise some unedable or reconisable foods that you can see and find on the roadside cafes.

(Flat meat/roadkill anybody) To long in HM Forces me thinks..

Oneworld Biker..

To old to die young.. To young to care....
Yep I will Tagg along with the Rd kill flat meat & items 3 4 5 not 1 or 2
& i'm ex Forces too
lol

may baa a sub section under stayuing Healthy as easting correctly is important
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Last edited by Selous; 29 Jun 2010 at 17:09.
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  #14  
Old 30 Jun 2010
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what ever spices you love
olive oil good for cooking, salad
if you don't cook often then buy one of 15 min meal books. cheap food rice, potatoes , penet butter, jam. Lean to make you own Banach which is just Indian bread. almost like baking powder bisects. hot cakes , potato pancakes.
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  #15  
Old 3 Jul 2010
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A second for Tobasco, anything else I just get whats going locally
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