Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB

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-   -   buying a (non-enfield) bike in india (http://www.horizonsunlimited.com/hubb/southern-asia/buying-non-enfield-bike-india-46432)

bmwroadrider 13 Nov 2009 06:48

buying a (non-enfield) bike in india
 
So I found a lot of information about buying an Enfield on the HUBB, but think for maintenance and ease of repairs going with a small 200cc Honda etc. would make more sense for me. I rode around Vietnam on a 150 step through for about 10 days and loved it. Does anyone have any info about this? Ideally I would want to buy a bike, ride around for 2-3 months and then sell the thing back.

Any pertinent advice would be appreciated.

Matt

waynemartin 19 Nov 2009 14:53

Youre better off buying an Enfield - there easier to get repaired and to sell on afterwards. Japanese bikes on the other hand arent as well known by the Inian artisan.

oldbmw 19 Nov 2009 23:46

Quote:

Originally Posted by waynemartin (Post 264737)
Youre better off buying an Enfield - there easier to get repaired and to sell on afterwards. Japanese bikes on the other hand arent as well known by the Inian artisan.

I suspect he wants to buy an Indian made copy of a Japanese bike. I have heard though that spares for these can sometimes be difficult.

Just another 10 miles to go to make 3k for me on my Enfield after a 60 Km poodle about today in the dry but cool late afternoon.

farqhuar 20 Nov 2009 05:09

Quote:

Originally Posted by waynemartin (Post 264737)
Youre better off buying an Enfield - there easier to get repaired and to sell on afterwards. Japanese bikes on the other hand arent as well known by the Inian artisan.

Yes, but on the other hand you are much, much less likely to need the services of local repairmen if you are riding a Japanese bike.

Sorry I can't provide any specific info Matt, other than to say that I did a similar ride last year through China on a local GS125 clone - covered 8,000km in one month, which is really pushing it on Chinese roads.

New bike price was $500, and I sold it for $150 - a fair bit of a price drop but there is no way you could have cheaper reliable motoring for around $10 per day.

alfonso-the-wanderer 30 Nov 2009 07:05

Why would you not go for a standard Indian bike? I sold my Yamaha Virago 2 years ago, because repair and spare parts were a continuous headache, and replaced it with a Bajaj Avenger. Done almost 30,000 km with it, and no complaints. Moreover, Bajaj has (at least in Sri Lanka, where I live) an excellent network of accredited repair & service stations. Great bike for just about 1500 USD (the 180cc version). The team-up with Kawasaki seem to have improved quality, and spare parts are available everywhere.

roadhawk 3 Dec 2009 12:40

We also have the Bajaj here in Indonesia. I looked on there website and they say they import to around 50 Nations. I am however unable to find a comprehensive list of their dealers/service centers worldwide, anybody know where I can find one?

I have read one story of a Colombian bloke who drove his Bajaj Pulsar 180 Across south America, through Africa, Turkey, Iran and Pakistan finally to arrive at a Bajaj factory in India. They said his only bike problem in the 35,000 miles was a magneto faliure in Turkey which was easily fixed by having one sent over from India then slapped in.

That being said I think they would be a good choice in India (authough maybe easier to get registered in your name in Nepal) as they have sevice centres everywhere in the odd chance that somthing does go wrong.

Personally when I tried the Bajaj Pulsar 200 here I felt it was a bit sluggish (due to the power to weight ratio) but seemed to stick to the road ok and the suspention was nice enough.

Happy riding mate.

ZMC888 4 Dec 2009 01:52

I'd go with a Hero Honda was called Unicorn (similar to a CBF150). They have I think 180cc version. Seems they are called Karizmas now, the ZMR version looks cool, not sure about the fairing though! 223cc fuel injected, should be pretty fun.

I had a Chinese made (Sundiro) Honda CBF150 for two years, 25,000 kms one seal on clutch cable ($4), and new rings at 25,000 kms ($20). Good enough reliability for you?

redninja 10 Dec 2009 06:09

Bajaj Pulsar, available in 150, 180, 200, 220cc, new price range 70,000 to 95,000 Rupes, Bajaj dealers everywhere, even in the smallest towns.

nomadb 11 Dec 2009 21:32

A quick search lead to following sites;

Bajaj Auto: A leading two wheeler manufacturer company in India.

More about the 220cc model
Bajaj New Pulsar 220 DTS-i

And their stunt show " The fastest INDIAN":funmeteryes:
::: Bajaj Pulsar MTV Stunt Mania :::

Regards

redninja 12 Dec 2009 01:58

I f you have the money for a 200 / 220 ie 60,000 to 80,000R's, then you are in the top end range for an Enfield, like a 2006 plus 500cc. You could even get a new one. An Enfield will carry luggage better than a jap bike, and are more forgiving on rough roads, which you will get everywhere. Performance is not really an issue as you will die if you go fast--- always ride in india at a speed, that if you are shunted off the road, you will remain upright, this may apply less to a local rider, with years of experience on indian roads. That big front wheel on the Enfield tends to ride over pot holes better than a modern bike. Steep front end rake and powerful disk brake, on a bajaj, can get you into alot of trouble, compared to the lazy gait of the Enfield. The Enfield is a lot heavier , but in the 40 to 60kmh range, where alot of riding is done, it soon becomes managable--unless you are very short and very light. A new enfield if properly run in or an as new model will give you 1000's of k's of stress free motoring

ZMC888 12 Dec 2009 12:11

redninja,

I've never read such horse-shit! A lightweight bike with a neutral riding position, normal rake and a powerful disk brake can get you into trouble? But a heavy underpowered bike with technology from the 1950's is better?

nomadb 12 Dec 2009 19:16

Well, lighter is better expecially when the roads are bad, or you ar offroadin, or there is no road.

However there are 2 different engines used in enfields as I can tell from their web site,
4 gear right foot operated (older)
5 gear leftt foot operated (newer?) versions.

Is this new 5 speed one more reliable? How long it has been on the market?
I really would appreciate owners real life experience if possible that is.

Regards

oldbmw 12 Dec 2009 21:00

Quote:

Originally Posted by nomadb (Post 267632)
Well, lighter is better expecially when the roads are bad, or you ar offroadin, or there is no road.

However there are 2 different engines used in enfields as I can tell from their web site,
4 gear right foot operated (older)
5 gear leftt foot operated (newer?) versions.

Is this new 5 speed one more reliable? How long it has been on the market?
I really would appreciate owners real life experience if possible that is.

Regards

The 5 speed gearbox and the lean burn engine are both new (modern technology) components built on new jigs and tooling. They are much better than their older counterparts. Mine is leak free. So far I have only done 3,00 miles and have had nothing untoward happen yet.
They are Very fuel efficient, mine has averaged 94mpg over that 3,00 miles.

redninja 13 Dec 2009 15:42

Enfields are dogs?
 
The 5 speeds ratios are spread better that the 4. I did 35,000k's on a 1998 500 bullet bought new. I have a 2004 500 at the moment with 28,000k's, both have been reasonable trouble free, but they do require more maintaince and set up to keep them going like this. I have a long-term Enfield friend who has done 70,000k's on a 180 pulsar in the last 2 years. He reckons front-end washouts and lock-ups are more likely on the pulsar, maybe because of ,poor old tech skinny tyres, stronger disk brake, quick steering, and very poor road conditions and hazards, and for touring luggage placement and balance is more critical on the pulsar, than the Enfield, he just carries less weight, his 180 is bullet proof never let him down and just keeps on going. Sure the Enfield is 40's technology but so are the roads, he reckons sometimes he misses the enfield because things happen slower,so he can see the negative things coming easier. Who Knows? Road reports on the newly released(in india) injected, unit construction Enfield have been very good, a worthy mix of modern tech with that old school look and feel.

nomadb 13 Dec 2009 19:04

Quote:

Originally Posted by redninja (Post 267725)
The 5 speeds ratios are spread better that the 4. I did 35,000k's on a 1998 500 bullet bought new. I have a 2004 500 at the moment with 28,000k's, both have been reasonable trouble free, but they do require more maintaince and set up to keep them going like this. I have a long-term Enfield friend who has done 70,000k's on a 180 pulsar in the last 2 years. He reckons front-end washouts and lock-ups are more likely on the pulsar, maybe because of ,poor old tech skinny tyres, stronger disk brake, quick steering, and very poor road conditions and hazards, and for touring luggage placement and balance is more critical on the pulsar, than the Enfield, he just carries less weight, his 180 is bullet proof never let him down and just keeps on going. Sure the Enfield is 40's technology but so are the roads, he reckons sometimes he misses the enfield because things happen slower,so he can see the negative things coming easier. Who Knows? Road reports on the newly released(in india) injected, unit construction Enfield have been very good, a worthy mix of modern tech with that old school look and feel.

Hello, Your friend who had ridden Pulsar AFTER Enfield may be had difficulties to adjust quicker acceleration and better brakes. :confused1:

It is good to hear new 5 speed has better performance. Can you specify what you mena with more maintenance? Every 1000km? Every week?

Can you also give some estimates for the prices of new 5 speed versions?

Regards

Burak


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