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  #1  
Old 20 Jun 2007
Em and Hame's Avatar
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Trans-Chaco experiences?

Have done a few searches and understand the Trans-Chaco through Paraguay to East Bolivia is a tough one. However, does anyone have any recent experiences? If at all, timing would be August-ish.

Cheers, Hamish
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  #2  
Old 20 Jun 2007
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trans chaco

hey Hamish
I just did that route 2 weeks ago from Villa Montes to Ibibobo (last town in Bolivia) before crossing into Paraguay and the trans Chaco - this is the main route now - not sure about the old crossing from Boyuibe but both routes meet at Mariscal Estigarriba. Anyway the entire route is perfect brand new billard table tar - completely straight with no turns or bends - the most boring 2 days i have spent on the bike so far - no views as everything is flat - no alternative routes because there just isnt any - around the menonite colonies in filadelfia there is some roads linking the small settlements - all completely straight with no turns or views - horrible rutty and holed asphalt too . .
if you go though The town of Concepcion is a gem - i stayed in the firestation with the volunteer bomberos - a super group of people who helped me loads - the entire town moves on 2 wheels - its quite a sight. I am leaving corumba today for santa Cruz so will post you on that in a few days - there has being alot of road and train blocks on this stretch in the last few days and some robberies of vehicles have occured - if you dont hear from me soon consider putting this route on the ´´maybe list`` !

suerte

fward
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  #3  
Old 20 Jun 2007
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Thumbs up

Fward,

Thanks for the reply. We're now in Cayafate, heading North. Would be good to catch up for a if your heading South. Have dropped you a mail.

Cheers, Hamish
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  #4  
Old 1 Jul 2007
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ruta 81

The ruta 81 in Argentina, parallel of the paraguayan border, is a good alternative to the trans chaco road, and certainly less boring since you still have to fight against elements on a 100 km section (border between the states of Salta and Formosa). I advise to stop overnight at Los Blancos, in the middle of the gravel section, there is a hotel there that wont ruin you (20 pesos overnight with drink and dinner) and you can buy gasoline.

Interesting vegetation on the way, semi arid, it looks like Africa and aborigenes look like indians (from India). Once in Formosa, you could contact Pete there who takes care of a local motorcycle club (bastardos de formosa), he will most likely take care of you and your bike...

Have fun
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  #5  
Old 3 Jul 2007
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Talking some hard work

Ad if you want some realy hard work then start (or end) in Boyuibe. A slightly uphill sandy track crossing the incision national park.
I garantue you will not be bored.
There is a story about it on my website.

Enjoy.
Maarten
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  #6  
Old 28 Jul 2007
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Hi,

does this new road end at a border with an immigration post and customs office.

The LP says there are no officals on the paraguayan side of the trans chaco border so you need to check the bike out in Asuncion. To my mind that hardly makes it worth checking in.

I have to get back to Ecuador from the south of Brasil ( for a few reasons). possibly relativaly quickly. If the road is as good as you say it is now a possible route. and it saves me retracing the north of chile. And i get to see Paraguay! if only briefly.

cheers for any help.
mike
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  #7  
Old 28 Jul 2007
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borders

hey Mike
when I crossed the Bolivian border to Paraguay (from Ibibobo Bolivia) there was about 60 kms no mans land and then a paraguay migracion/import checkpoint - they didnt stamp anything but checked papers and sent me on to mariscal estigarriba for the Aduana form and stamp for the bike. I was led to believe that the passport entry stamp was possible to have at Pozo Colorado - the passport people in Pedro Juan Cabellero told me this when I arrived there to leave paraguay for Brazil ( I completely forgot the passport entry stamp - i thought the guys at mariscal estigarriba had done this - 50 dollars to rectify this on this brazilian side)
Aswell as this checkpoint 60kms in there was at least 2 other police/army checkpoints I went through with all paperwork checked - this is a big drug smuggling route between the two countries - i think you run the risk of been turned back if you plan on crossing the country without that temporary import form for the bike.
But you shouldnt have to go to Asuncion - you can sign out at mariscal estigarriba which is on the way

hope its some help

fward
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  #8  
Old 29 Jul 2007
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Fward,

thanks a lot.
Sounds pretty straight forward, and a useful warning about the checkpoints and paperwork.
Sounds like the route is worth a visit now.
What sort of fuel range do you need or are there enough places to get gas on the way?

cheers
mike
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  #9  
Old 2 Aug 2007
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crossing

hey mike
fuelwise all is good travelling east to west as you are through Pozo Colorado, Filadelfia and up to Mariscal Estigarriba - these towns and points inbetween have random fuel stations. After the latter you will travel about 180kms ( if memory serves me well ) to a town (townland?) called Estancia La Patria. There isnt a petrol station here as such but if you ask around you will find what appears to be an abandoned gas station (roof gantry and all) that will probably be occupied by a load of can drinking paraguayans sitting around in deckchairs ( lovely guys the day i was there ) with one guy who sells fuel out of drums for reasonable prices.
At this point you have the option of taking the newly finished perfect asphalt road southwest for Ivibobo- Villa Montes in Bolivia ( this new road is not on any map yet ) or the old trans chaco road northwest to Hito Villazon (paraguay border) and on to Boyuibe in Bolivia. I imagine the latter route is the one for you if heading to Ecuador via La Paz but as i have only travelled the former I cant vouch for fuel availability on this stretch. So make sure to fuelup in Estancia in the event of this route being similar to the southwest Ivibobo route I took ( 300kms more or less without a fuel stop of any kind).

Ask the guys at Estancia La Patria about your route northwest to Boyuibe in Bolivia - they will know the lie of the land

best of the luck

f
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  #10  
Old 5 Apr 2008
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Thumbs up fuel between Border of Bolivia and Filadefia/Paraguay

[quote=fward;140236]
I just did that route 2 weeks ago from Villa Montes to Ibibobo (last town in Bolivia) before crossing into Paraguay and the trans Chaco - this is the main route now - not sure about the old crossing from Boyuibe but both routes meet at Mariscal Estigarriba. Anyway the entire route is perfect brand new billard table tar - completely straight with no turns or bends - the most boring 2 days i have spent on the bike so far - no views as everything is flat - no alternative routes because there just isnt any - around the menonite colonies in filadelfia there is some roads linking the small settlements - all completely straight with no turns or views - horrible rutty and holed asphalt too . .

Does anyone know?
Regards
armin
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  #11  
Old 5 Apr 2008
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How much do you have to pay for the temporary bike permit? Is it true that you have to get permission first from the Paraguayan embassy in a neighboring country?


BTW: Hamish and Mike do you want to meet up to drive to Paraguay? I am in Buenos Aires trying to sell my bike, but I like the idea of seeing Paraguay and than selling the bike there.


Thank You,
Geoff
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  #12  
Old 5 Apr 2008
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TransChaco

Is there fuel supply between Bolivia + filadefia, Paraguay on the trans Chaco route nr 9 - Does anyone know?
Regards
armin[/quote]
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  #13  
Old 8 Apr 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by afear View Post
Is there fuel supply between Bolivia + filadefia, Paraguay on the trans Chaco route nr 9 - Does anyone know?
Regards
armin
[/QUOTE]

Hi,

i did end up doing that route last year, about August time.
There was a Gas station on the new Trans chaco road a bit after the customs and immigration checkpoint. And where the road splits for the old and new road.

HOWEVER it didn´t have any petrol when i went past. and i wouldn´t count on it now!
I found i needed a bit more range than the post above said. i think i covered 240 miles between fuel stops from Filidelfia, and the next town with gas in Bolivia.

However, the tarmac ended very abruptly at the Bolivian border, so i ended up trundling along in 2nd and 3rd for over 100km which saved fuel!

The bolivians are building their section of the road but are a bit slow! but they may have made progress by now , or not as the case may be.

there is not a lot to see, but the road is excellent and i got no hassle what so ever on that section, and the all border people where really helpful even after i woke them up from their siestas! not much was using the road at the time to be fair!

Went i got in to paraguay they said i didn´t need bike import papers, and weren´t going to give them to me. however at teh other end they wanted them. i explained and they said fine and i was on my way. but could have been worse , so just be careful.

The police also are dodgy as anything. they asked for all sorts of imaginery paperwork. to which i produced all sorts of equally implausible papers as well, with a "of course i have that". seemed to work. but don´t show a hint of doubt with them!

have fun

cheers
mike
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  #14  
Old 8 Apr 2008
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gracias Mike

that's pretty good news.
I'm on my way
Armin
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