Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > Regional Forums > South America

South America Topics specific to South America only.
Contact Overland Solutions for all your custom modifications and setup for overland travel.

Ride-Chile.com Motorcycle Tours & Rentals

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 13 Jun 2007
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: California
Posts: 15
South America Trip - Advice Wanted

Hi All,

I'm planning a trip with a buddy and hope to get some feedback from you guys regarding the route, the timing and bike choice.

We want to do this trip in no more than 60 days from mid-January to mid-March and plan on taking the following route:

Lima (Peru) - La Paz (Bolivia) - Asuncion (Paraguay) - Curitiba (Brazil) - São Paulo (Brazil) - Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

We'd like to do Carnival in Rio and then move on to:

Porto Alegre (Brazil) - Montevideo (Uruguay) - Buenos Aires (Argentina) - Santiago (Chile) - Lima (Peru)
  • Any advice on weather along the route this time of year?
  • Is the time OK for this trip, I think it's about 8000 miles in about 60 days with time for a few days in Rio, Buenos Aires, etc.
  • Would a KLR650 be a good bike for a trip like this? Or should we go for the BMWF650?
  • Any advice cool places to visit along the way? I have a list of the most obvious places from Lonely Planet, etc., but any advice is welcome.
Any comments and advice is welcome, thank you!

Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 13 Jun 2007
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 114
Hello,
well as i calculate you plan to ride 130miles a day or even more since you are not going to ridse every day (so about 150miles a day).

I believe this might be a little too much. This might go as long as you never have any problems (with your bike, yourself, means health, with border crossing, road conditions, political situation....). However, we made the experiance that you should not pack too much in a given timeperiod.

Certainly it does not seem to be a huge daily distance but assuming that you could get into trouble in Bolivia for example because of its political problems or because of its poor road conditions, I would take more time for that ride or ride less far.

Since you will see most things nearby the road but not when riding, I suggest it is better to stay here or there in cities/villages and not riding just to Rio for the party.

That is my opinion, certainly there are others, but for me traveling consists in more than just riding miles after miles.

Anyway, it does not matter how you decide, I wish you a very nice trip anyway.

Burnout1
__________________
www.moto-adventure.ch - just THE page about touring Europe and South america by bike!
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 13 Jun 2007
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Wellington, New Zealand
Posts: 146
Personally I think it´s a little rushed but I like to do it slow. I enjoy talking to the locals and frustrating time wasting setbacks happen. Rio will be a good party but you may need a week of small days afterwards to recover?!?

I think you´ll want to relax at a beach in the south of Brazil/Uruguay also.

happy travels
__________________
The Road To Rio - Locokiwi
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 14 Jun 2007
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: California
Posts: 15
Thanks, those are good points.

Looking at just travel-days and road conditions, which of the following legs would you be most concerned about (I will split up some of these in shorter legs later):
  • Lima (Peru) - La Paz (Bolivia) - 897 miles
  • La Paz (Bolivia) - Asuncion (Paraguay) - 1188 miles
  • Asuncion (Paraguay) - Curitiba (Brazil) - 609 miles
  • Curitiba (Brazil) - São Paulo (Brazil) - 243 miles
  • São Paulo (Brazil) - Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) - 261 miles
  • Curitiba (Brazil) - Porto Alegre (Brazil) - 403 miles
  • Porto Alegre (Brazil) - Montevideo (Uruguay) - 517 miles
  • Montevideo (Uruguay) - Buenos Aires (Argentina) - 368 miles
  • Buenos Aires (Argentina) Santiago (Chile) - 824 miles
  • Santiago (Chile) - Lima (Peru) - 2105 miles
Looking at maps it looks like most (if not all) of this is paved. Is it crazy to think we could average 200-300 miles per day on travel days?

Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 16 Jun 2007
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: England
Posts: 203
Smile Travelling Isn't A Race

I took six months last year riding a Honda 125 from Veracruz, Mexico, to Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego. I met a couple of young men on BMWs in Mendoza who had ridden from Canada in two months. At that rate they couldn't have seen nor experienced much other than the road. Stopping at places for a few days, discovering how people live and how you fit in is worth more than an extra 1000 kilometres. Mind, aged 74, I don't have unlimited time so do hurry on occasion. I stored the bike in Ushuaia and collect it next month to ride north to the US. I crossed mountains and Alte Plano on the way south and ate meat. This journey I will keep to the coast and eat shrimp! And freeze at the beginning and end of the journey. But OLD MEN CAN'T WAIT.
Good luck and have fun...

blog at home
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 16 Jun 2007
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Wellington, New Zealand
Posts: 146
Hmm, glad others have weighed in as it´s so personal. If you enjoy long days on the bike which I assume you must do I would suggest you plan a stretch to take your time/explore/get to know locals, culture, day off bike/allow for delays (Crossing Bolivia would seem to be the obvious choice) and arrange once you get to Rio to set the bike up for good roads, long days.

If running late you could cut out the crossing to Santiago?

good luck, the choice is yours. I think your gut feel when you get there will be your only true guide. Don´t hesitate to change plans if you feel your experience would be better along a different route.

Just to balance what I am saying about the travel experience, my fathers advice was not to underestimate the satisfaction of achieving what you have set out to do. You can modify what you are doing when you get there but I would also suggest you consider your main goal of travel, only you can answer that.
__________________
The Road To Rio - Locokiwi

Last edited by The Big J; 16 Jun 2007 at 22:23. Reason: Obi Wan Kenobi advice remedied
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 17 Jun 2007
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: chicago il usa
Posts: 44
I say if you can afford more time (& money) it would be better, however it's a personal choice and I would rather be rushed and see all rather than not do it at all.
In december I plan to ride from B.A to Ushuia and back North to Chicago in 2 months that's all the time I can afford But I will do it that way rather than not at all.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 18 Jun 2007
Gold Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Posts: 667
Dear ImnOTlost,

Would like to help. Need to know if you are shipping your bikes into Lima and then shipping them out or buying in Lima?
Elisa on her Honda XR 250 Tornado and me on my Honda NX400 Falcon did Buenos Aires- San Pedro Atacama/Chile-coast of Chile and Peru (side trip to Nasca/Arequipa) up to Lima-over to Ayuchuco-down the Central Andies to Albancay - Cuzco - around Lake Titicaca over to La Paz/Bolivia and back to Buenos Aires. About 12,000 Kilometers or 4,725 miles, when looking at maps of south America remember the distaces are in kilometers and there are 2.54 kilometers to each mile. We left BA in May and returned in August trip was well over 3 months.
In retrospect, this was a very fast trip...an ankle sprain (sidewalk related) cost us three days...it was really tough in Lima and we couldn't get out of there fast enough, because of the traffic, not the people, riding out of Lima is sort of escaping the rings of Hell...The further away from the city center the more difficult/dangerous the streets become.
I was very happy we did not have top of the line touring bikes with foreign plates, our Hondas, purchased in Buenos Aires were built by Honda for South America and blended in --almost. Most bikes were even smaller than elisa's 250.
There were many, many places we could have easily stayed, quite happily for a few more days than we did. Once in the Central Andies we had to wait two days for gas to be delivered to the gas station....oh and I forgot, in Chile after that earthquake that made international news we were stranded for 2 days while the mountain roads were cleared of landslides and bodies and made safe ???...we lost a couple days circumventing rivers with washed out bridges. Guess we lost about two weeks from unexpected events such as police road blocks, (due to Banditos) and cocalero roadblocks ( coco growers protests) and Army road blocks due political activity and our own road blocks when we were just too cold, and I mean frozen,....and too tired to go on....
We had no mechanical problems with the Hondas, (we pulled the air filters at 4,500 meters altitude) but if we did breakdown we could order needed parts from whatever country we were in, that might only take a week or so.... this is not true with BMW or KLR, especially new models...add at least another week or so .... Parts for larger Hondas are sometimes unavailable as everything over the 400cc is imported. The 250cc and 400cc Hondas are made by Honda in Brazil.
They are also much lighter and we fell over alot, especially in the deep sand that had been blown on the Pan American Highway and slowed our speed to about 30 K and hour... At least we did not have to unload gear to pick up the bikes...Which would have taken another two weeks...just kidding..
I would reccomend bring your gear and fly into Buenos Aires, buy two new Honda NX400s on a credit card for $5,000.00 US dollars and tour Argentina It is a very diverse and interesting country with the most beautiful women in South America....... and then resell the Hondas at the same dealer in Buenos Aires or store them here in Buenos Aires for your next trip..., and pay your credit card $3,5000 or more from the sale of your bike...see my post under Central and South America BUY/SELL, thread. Or rent the BMWs here in Buenos Aires with a back up team standing by...to get parts/repairs to you...
Have you through about insurance, you can easily spend a half a day day at each border just getting through and buying insurance for the next country...and the fact you will need to apply for a visa for Paraquay and apply for a visa visa for Brazil and you will need translations of your driving permits for Brazil? And, sometimes borders are completely closed....
Are you planning on camping or hotels most of the time? Finding safe camping and hotels takes time each day and eating should be relaxed and enjoyable, and it is necessary to keep up your immune systems for you will be encountering bateria that your system is not immune too. So you should plan on about one sick or rest day per week of travel.
I wish you well however you travel by motorcycle.., it is the greatest contempory experience of our time.......As a very young man, after two years as a United States Peace Corps Volunteer in Costa Rica I bought a 175cc Honda in Costa Rica and rode it to Los Angeles, California that took me 4 months... Hope this helps.. We will be at Viedma and south with the HUBB group this December and currently live with our two Hondas in Buenos Aires...
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 20 Jun 2007
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: California
Posts: 15
Thanks for the help. You had a pretty eventful trip xflitrate! Bandidos, earthquakes! Wow!

We're bringing bikes to Lima and back. We may import the bikes and sell them in Lima if it makes financial sense. Maybe buying in Lima is better, we'll check pricing.

I scheduled the trip in greater detail and it does look rushed, so based on that and the feedback here we'll modify our trip.

Btw. 1 mile is 1.6km so your 12km trip was 7500 miles.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 20 Jun 2007
Gold Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Posts: 667
xfiltrate was wrong: 1 mile equals 1.6 kilometers

Thanks for the correction IMNOTLOST- you are absolutely correct and my calculation was wrong. I should have know that because 50mph is 80kph... our trip was 7,500 miles...
In my defense, I posted alot that night and was lazy and tired.

Be sure to check if Peru stamps your passport (con vehiculo) when you get the bike out of customs (aduana), if you ship it into Lima. Sometimes you cannot legally leave a country without your vehicle/motorcycle... if it is stamped in your passport that you entered with or had shipped in a vehicle or motorcyle. Well you can leave, but the bike has to be turned in to customs and you pay a storage fee. That is one reason buying in counrty is better than shipping in and then selling foreign registered vehicles/motorcycles.

It is possible to arrange to pay foreign vehicle import tax and then sell a foreign registered motorcycle, but it has been my experience that this tax is equal to most of the value of the bike. This tax is imposed to prevent people from buying vehicles in Uruguay, for example, and selling them in Argentina. Bikes are less expensive in Uruguay. It is to protect the agencies that sell vehicle/motorcycles...

The reality is many, many vehicle/bikes are still registered in the previous/ foreign owners names, even through the previous/foreign owner has sold the veh/moto to a local. This is OK until there is an accident and then the registered owner of the veh/motor might be held responsible for damages caused by the buyer. This is probably Ok if you never plan on returning to that country, that is if you are permitted out of the country without yourveh/moto. My advice, keep your options open and play by the rules.

Defending yourself in a foreign court is difficult. I remember in Turkey, the law states that all foreigners (non Turkish citizens) are considered at fault in any accident, because if they had not been in the country the accident would not have happened, even if the Turk caused the accident.

In the face of possible complications, do some homework before making decision to ship, sell etc....thanks for the correction.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 22 Jun 2007
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: California
Posts: 15
Thank you so much! I really appreciate your help!

I'm checking the historical weather along the route in January and February using weather underground. It looks like it rains a lot in Cuzco, La Paz, Sucre, etc. that time of year, does that match people's experience?

Check for instance: History : Weather Underground


Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 10 Jul 2007
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 12
... Good Thread

... I ship my bike to BsAs in two weeks and will be jaunting round Argentina, Uruguay and bits of Chile for the rest of the year. It's hard to judge if you're over or under prepared mentally as well as bureaucratically, thanks for the information.

John
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Through South America livelarg South America 17 11 Aug 2005 14:48
carrying Knives in South America *Touring Ted* South America 8 27 Jul 2005 05:59
Wanted: Toyota Landcruiser in South Africa for overland trip Michiel 4WD Overland TRAVEL 1 20 Jul 2005 00:00
Sahara Trip Reports Wanted. Chris Scott Sahara Travel Forum 5 21 May 2003 02:07
Buying XT600 in South America tsipi_r Travellers' questions that don't fit anywhere else 1 22 Jun 2001 18:44

 
 
 

NEW! HU 2015 Motorcycle Adventure Travel Calendar is now available! Get your copy now for some terrific travel inspiration!

HUGE, 11.5 x 16.5 inches, beautifully printed in Germany on top quality stock! Photos are the winning images from over 600 entries in the 9th Annual HU Photo Contest!

Horizons Unlimited 2015 Motorcycle Adventure Travel Calendar.

"The calendar is magnificent!"

"I just wanted to say how much I'm loving the new, larger calendar!"

We share the profit with the winning photographers. YOU could be in the HU Calendar too - enter here!

Next HU Eventscalendar

See all events

 

HU DVD Autumn Special!

Take 40% off Road Heroes Part 1 until October 31 only!

Road Heroes features tales of adventure, joy and sheer terror by veteran travellers Peter and Kay Forwood (193 countries two-up on a Harley); Dr. Greg Frazier (5 times RTW); Tiffany Coates (RTW solo female); and Rene Cormier (University of Gravel Roads).

The first in an exciting new series, Road Heroes features tales of adventure, joy and sheer terror by veteran travellers."Inspiring and hilarious!"

"I loved watching this DVD!"

"Lots of amazing stories and even more amazing photographs, it's great fun and very inspirational."

"Wonderful entertainment!"

Check it out at the HU Store! Remember to use Coupon Code 'HEROES' on your order when you checkout.



Scottoiler automatic chain oilers. The most important accessory for your next motorcycle adventure!


Renedian Adventures


Renedian Adventures

What others say about HU...

"I just wanted to say thanks for doing this and sharing so much with the rest of us." Dave, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the DVD series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring! The new look of the website is very impressive, updated and catchy. Thank you so very much!" Jennifer, Canada

"...Great site. Keep up the good work." Murray and Carmen, Australia

"We just finished a 7 month 22,000+ mile scouting trip from Alaska to the bottom of Chile and I can't tell you how many times we referred to your site for help. From how to adjust your valves, to where to stay in the back country of Peru. Horizons Unlimited was a key player in our success. Motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world are in debt to your services." Alaska Riders

contest pic

10th Annual HU Travellers Photo Contest is on now! This is an opportunity for YOU to show us your best photos and win prizes!

NEW! HU 2014 Adventure Travel T-shirts! are now available in several colors! Be the first kid on your block to have them! New lower prices on synths!

HU 2014 T-shirts now in!

Check out the new Gildan Performance cotton-feel t-shirt - 100% poly, feels like soft cotton!


What turns you on to motorcycle travel?


Global Rescue, WORLDwide evacuation services for EVERYONE

Global Rescue is the premier provider of medical, security and evacuation services worldwide and is the only company that will come to you, wherever you are, and evacuate you to your home hospital of choice. Additionally, Global Rescue places no restrictions on country of citizenship - all nationalities are eligible to sign-up!


New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80 G/S motorcycle.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events (22 this year!); we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, the HUBB or to receive the e-zine. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.


Books & DVDs

amazon

All the best travel books and videos listed and often reviewed on HU's famous Books page. Check it out and get great travel books from all over the world.


Motorcycle Express for shipping and insurance!

Motorcycle Express

MC Air Shipping, (uncrated) USA / Canada / Europe and other areas. Be sure to say "Horizons Unlimited" to get your $25 discount on Shipping!
Insurance - see: For foreigners traveling in US and Canada and for Americans and Canadians traveling in other countries, then mail it to MC Express and get your HU $15 discount!




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 16:57.