Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > Ride Tales, Trip Reports and Stories > Ride Tales

Ride Tales An easy way to post your ride reports, whether it's a weekend ride or around the world. Please make the first words of the title WHERE the ride is. See the announcement in the forum for details on posting. Please do NOT just post a link to your site. For a link, see Get a Link.
Contact Overland Solutions for all your custom modifications and setup for overland travel.

Like Tree12Likes

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #91  
Old 28 Mar 2011
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Edinburgh
Posts: 260
Nat Geo

Hey Glenn,
Just watched about your ordeal in Colombia on the 'Banged Up Abroad' series, compliments of Nat Geo Channel. Interesting to say the least!

I'm sure it would have broken many others but glad to see your still on the road.

Take Care. Hope to see you on the road some day.
__________________
Geoffshing

'Security is a product of one's own imagination, it does not exist in nature as a rule, life is either a daring adventure or nothing.'
Reply With Quote
  #92  
Old 12 Apr 2011
strikingviking's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Mazatlan, Mexico
Posts: 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by geoffshing View Post
Hey Glenn,
Just watched about your ordeal in Colombia on the 'Banged Up Abroad' series, compliments of Nat Geo Channel. Interesting to say the least!

I'm sure it would have broken many others but glad to see your still on the road.

Take Care. Hope to see you on the road some day.
Thanks amigo. Here is a link to that show. International viewing
__________________
EARTH RIDE!
Understanding the world through adventure travel.
www.strikingviking.net


Last edited by strikingviking; 2 Mar 2012 at 15:07. Reason: Updated link
Reply With Quote
  #93  
Old 12 Apr 2011
strikingviking's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Mazatlan, Mexico
Posts: 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by AndyT View Post
Any updates on the NatGeo project mentioned earlier in this thread?
We are still laboring away. Same old story though, I don't like their ideas and they don't like mine. Everything these days is about a budget first. We'll keep you posted though.
__________________
EARTH RIDE!
Understanding the world through adventure travel.
www.strikingviking.net

Reply With Quote
  #94  
Old 12 Apr 2011
strikingviking's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Mazatlan, Mexico
Posts: 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by dickie View Post
hey Glen

I sitting here in Hawaii on a two month holiday ( I quit my job ). I have been reading non stop. I read your book. Great book.

This blog was very hard to find. I think that you have many fans that would like to find this.

Keep it up and let me know of your conning to Canada. I notice it's not on your map. northern canada can be as exciting and foreign as some of your other travels. I would reccomend doing a fall ride. Wait for the freezeup then do one of the ice roads. If that seems too crazy then spring summer anywhere in Canada would be good especially western Canada up to the Yukon, Alaska and the arctic ocean.

Be safe and good

Mark
Thanks Mark. Northern Canada, now that sounds interesting. Maybe start in late spring and ride through the summer?

Thanks for buying my book, all proceeds are donated to Room to Read, an NGO building schools in the developing world. (Both of them are now on the best seller list.)

__________________
EARTH RIDE!
Understanding the world through adventure travel.
www.strikingviking.net

Reply With Quote
  #95  
Old 2 Mar 2012
strikingviking's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Mazatlan, Mexico
Posts: 194
Enjoy our ten minute promo video

We did twenty-six of these multimedia shows for BMW across the US. This video includes a variety of short media clips and pics from riding the planet.



Share the adventure!
__________________
EARTH RIDE!
Understanding the world through adventure travel.
www.strikingviking.net

Reply With Quote
  #96  
Old 3 Mar 2012
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Ottawa
Posts: 55
Glen

I just got through watching the National Geographic video documenting your
ordeal in Colombia. It was a riveting experience to watch. Not something any of us would ever want to go through.

I worked down in Colombia many years ago with the oil companies and knew some other oilfield workers who had the misfortune of also being kidnapped. I remember them recounting being subjected to the same kind of physical and psychological mistreatment that you went through.

This past summer I came back down to Colombia and spent two weeks riding around the country on a motorcycle. The security situation in Colombia has improved immensely over these past years, at least by Colombian standards. Still there is the possibility of finding yourself in the wrong place at the wrong
time. I rode through some of the less secure parts of Colombia where there was known guerrilla activity and the thought of being kidnapped did play on my mind especially since I had read your earlier book and so was familiar with your story. I had already formulated a plan in my mind that if I found myself in a possible kidnapping situation, I was not stopping for anything and actually had practiced seeing how fast I could perform a u turn on my motorcycle if needed. If you were to face a similar situation again as you did in Colombia, do you think you would act any differently ?

Cheers

Brian

Last edited by Ride4Adventure; 3 Mar 2012 at 23:53.
Reply With Quote
  #97  
Old 3 Mar 2012
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Kolkata, India
Posts: 1
Hats off to you Glen

Dear Glen,

I just overwhelmed to read your experiences worldwide by a motorcycle. I am also a Motorcycle man but your experiences are so vast that I cannot tell anything about my experiences. I have watched the Nat Geo episode with my wife and imagined what we do if we are in same situation. We amy ended up dead in that case. As from India I can say all the bikers mostly do a certain part of my vast country - that is Goa, Rajasthan, Delhi, Benaras, Bodhgaya like that - but there is some huge southern part and Himalayan part left over. In your next visit to my country (please bring your motorcycle) we can together travel in those parts which foreigners mainly not prefer to go. From my part its an humble invitation for re-discovering my country.

Surely we will meet someday somewhere in the middle of a road.....

Cheers
KK
__________________
Highway is always lonely, we add life to them.
Reply With Quote
  #98  
Old 27 Mar 2012
strikingviking's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Mazatlan, Mexico
Posts: 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ride4Adventure View Post
Glen

I just got through watching the National Geographic video documenting your
ordeal in Colombia. It was a riveting experience to watch. Not something any of us would ever want to go through.

I worked down in Colombia many years ago with the oil companies and knew some other oilfield workers who had the misfortune of also being kidnapped. I remember them recounting being subjected to the same kind of physical and psychological mistreatment that you went through.

This past summer I came back down to Colombia and spent two weeks riding around the country on a motorcycle. The security situation in Colombia has improved immensely over these past years, at least by Colombian standards. Still there is the possibility of finding yourself in the wrong place at the wrong
time. I rode through some of the less secure parts of Colombia where there was known guerrilla activity and the thought of being kidnapped did play on my mind especially since I had read your earlier book and so was familiar with your story. I had already formulated a plan in my mind that if I found myself in a possible kidnapping situation, I was not stopping for anything and actually had practiced seeing how fast I could perform a u turn on my motorcycle if needed. If you were to face a similar situation again as you did in Colombia, do you think you would act any differently ?

Cheers

Brian
Hi Brian,
Given how horrible that relatively brief experience was and the small miracle that it took for me to be released, I'd never stop again for men with guns. From first hand experience I can assure you that a bullet would be better.

For released hostages, the inner turmoil does not end when captivity ends and they return home. In fact, often it becomes worse than when originally being held, as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder sets in. Whenever I see situations around the world from the Middle East to Colombia or Afghanistan where a hostage has been released, my heart goes out to them and their families because I know well, what is in store for them. Although on the surface it appears to be a happy situation with new found freedom, even with competent help in the healing process, life will never be the same for any of them.

I am one of the few who is doing well but it did take several years to calm my mind. And that is mainly because of a belief that every disaster can also be a springboard to the next level up.
gh
__________________
EARTH RIDE!
Understanding the world through adventure travel.
www.strikingviking.net

Reply With Quote
  #99  
Old 28 Mar 2012
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: by the side of the road
Posts: 18
big respect !!

Emile
__________________
www.passingalong.nl to follow my round the world motorcycle ride.
Reply With Quote
  #100  
Old 11 Dec 2012
strikingviking's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Mazatlan, Mexico
Posts: 194
Chalbi Desert, Kenya


Since the whole village was asleep, I probably could have dozed until sunrise without anyone noticing, but once awake it was best to avoid potential hassles and roll for Marsabit, the last small Kenyan town with electricity. Yet even if I reached there, the next long stretch to Moyale at the Ethiopian border is the fiercest section. The only light at the end of this tunnel was knowing that eventually an asphalt road at the frontier would lead to Addis Ababa and hopefully to a set of mechanic’s tools to repair a broken suspension.

Out of fear and common sense, no one drives after dark in Kenya, but I hoped that also meant any bad guys were likely fast asleep dreaming of daytime plundering. Attempts to convince myself that a night ride under the stars would ease the misery were quickly squashed when I recalled, the previous day’s events. A few optimistic test bounces in the saddle confirmed that no divine healing had occurred during the last four hours, and there was no telling if the shock absorber would last another day or another mile. I was beyond the point of no return in every direction.

Unlike blazing desert days, midnight air was crisp and clean. The push of a button made the motorcycle grumble to life. But my confidence faded as yesterday’s brutal jarring resumed even worse than I remembered. There would be no escape in a first-gear crawl, easing over every ridge and rock. With zero travel in a frozen shock, violent kicking and bucking made simply hanging on to the handlebars a challenge.



At 10 miles per hour without rear suspension, I tried to calculate how many hours it would take to ride 300 miles. Maybe throttling up to 15miles per hour would shave an hour or two. Either way, between robbers and vicious terrain, one of Africa’s worst roads was ready to bang and test the limits of both my internal organs and a thoroughly abused motorcycle frame.

At least riding slow allowed me a chance to evaluate which bumps and gullies to dodge to minimize impacts. Standing on the foot pegs with bent knees was temporary relief but became too tiring, requiring rest stops every 30minutes. With fatigued arms and legs, a creeping desert dawn glowed into a bursting orange sunrise.



By noon, the last carefully packed apples had shaken into mush and the fragmented shells of hard-boiled eggs had ground together with the yolks into gooey paste. Combining the concoction together to swallow in lumps was still better than the foul-tasting local fare. But the smelly combined proteins were nutritious, and there was still a gallon of water left to last the day. My need for intense focus on the road meant that stunning savanna scenery passed by in a jiggling peripheral blur. By noon, there were still no other vehicles in sight.

Finally, just after the 20th straight hour of rolling misery, a two-room dilapidated structure appeared with barely legible, grime covered words above the tilting doorway — Marsabit Medical Center. Even though I knew more of the same still lay ahead, arriving on the town’s outskirts felt like reaching the finish line at an Olympic event.



Marsabit town is a scene out of America’s Wild West — scrawny cattle being driven past windowless ramshackle wooden cabins and clouds of red grit swirling down stony clay avenues. Nothing has been maintained or repaired since it was built decades before. Few buildings had electric power, and none had running water. Hand-painted weathered letters on broken signs described what was offered inside.



In Magic Marcie’s Fashion Design, piles of musty used clothing donated by international charities were ready to be illegally resold. Marsabit General Supermarket was a doorless shack selling milk in cartons and canned meats with labels reading “A Gift from the People of New Zealand.” What wasn’t crumbling was rusting or sat gathering dust while no one seemed to care. As in many developing countries, men stood drinking afternoon tea and cheap beers by night.

From disordered, debris-strewn markets, subservient women in lace headscarves trudged under heavy loads of vegetable baskets and bundled firewood. Engaged in their share of the labor, caped young boys in worn sandals tugged on ropes, leading bleating goats to pasture. What little water there is must be hand carried or lugged in lopsided wooden wheelbarrows wherever needed or to those who can afford it.



Jey-Jey Center is the only hotel secured by barbed wire and with a deteriorating underground cistern servicing a filthy squat toilet — at five bucks a night, the single cement cubicles were a bargain. Cleans sheets stopped mattering to me months ago, as long they don’t stink and are not overrun with fleas. At least the two-year drought had eliminated mosquitoes and the threat of malaria.

For boring evenings, a beat-down honky-tonk built of splintered planks provided economical entertainment as one strolled past broken saloon doors hanging off rusted hinges. With African rap music blaring through crackling metal speakers, the ear-splitting throbs were a deafening assault as I wandered. Safe within steel-barred cages, middle-aged, chubby Indian men peddled rotgut whiskey and warm local beers while drunks slobbered on themselves in darkened corners.

The scene was made complete as potbellied hookers with long, drooping breasts flashed forlorn smiles through decayed teeth and puffy maroon lips. But late nights in Marsabit are for partiers with more determination than me, and other than this exclusive freak show, there was nothing else enticing enough to keep me awake.

In the afternoon, the moment I ventured outside Jey-Jey’s, throngs of unkempt children crowded around me, yelling “Sweets, sweets, give me money, give me pens!” Although it’s clear that the foreigner’s role in Africa is strictly for giving, all that I offer is bumpy rides on a limping motorcycle.

Having trained their children to beg, scowling parents glared as giggling youngsters abandoned rehearsed scam-lines and jumped with delight, lining up to be next for a spin through town. Sometimes you just have to let kids be kids. With one eager child on the front and two on the back, appeasing the crowd still required a whole afternoon. Following the Pied Piper back to Jey-Jey’s, the trailing troops assured me they would stand guard as I swatted away the last of persistent horseflies and tried to forget the situation while spiraling into sleep.



No matter how good it feels, ignoring problems will not make them disappear, but leaving the bike parked for three peaceful days allowed me enough time to quit peeing burgundy and relieve an aching back. Still, the question of reaching the border returns with a confirmation by locals that bandits are active again. “They don’t tell you to stop, they shoot the driver and then attack passengers.”

Pulling off his shirt, one truck driver says, “Here, look at my body. I’ve already been shot five times.” On that thought, it’s likely the road ahead is to become more interesting still.

__________________
EARTH RIDE!
Understanding the world through adventure travel.
www.strikingviking.net

Reply With Quote
  #101  
Old 12 Dec 2012
Super Moderator
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: bellingham, WA, USA
Posts: 1,973
I dunno man, it seems to me you're making a lot of sneering assumptions about the people whose lives you're interrupting. Who told you that parents were teaching their kids to beg? My experience has always been that the parents wish their kids would NOT beg, but that the kids are encouraged by outsiders who respond by giving them stuff, thereby undermining existing familial roles and responsibilities. And who told you what the parents were thinking while you rode the kids around: again, my experience has been that I can't possibly know what anyone is thinking unless they tell me. Cultures differ in their expectations of kids; in the part of West Africa, where I spend a fair amount of time, parents become alarmed if their kids are too overtly happy--giggling, smiling, joking. They view this as a real problem, perhaps an indicator of what we would call mental illness. No way I could have known this while passing through, casually entertaining the local kids (as I do) by offering rides or teaching juggling.

Another thing I've heard all over the world from parents is that outsiders--tourists, including you and I--barge into town showing their kids that traditional or homegrown ways of life are inferior to tourist ways. What are you really teaching by riding the kids around on your motorbike? What do their parents think you're teaching? Sometimes the local people are far more sophisticated about the value systems brought by tourists than are the tourists themselves.

YMMV, but I think these things are worth keeping in mind.

Mark
Reply With Quote
  #102  
Old 12 Dec 2012
strikingviking's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Mazatlan, Mexico
Posts: 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by markharf View Post
I dunno man, it seems to me you're making a lot of sneering assumptions about the people whose lives you're interrupting. Who told you that parents were teaching their kids to beg? My experience has always been that the parents wish their kids would NOT beg, but that the kids are encouraged by outsiders who respond by giving them stuff, thereby undermining existing familial roles and responsibilities. And who told you what the parents were thinking while you rode the kids around: again, my experience has been that I can't possibly know what anyone is thinking unless they tell me. Cultures differ in their expectations of kids; in the part of West Africa, where I spend a fair amount of time, parents become alarmed if their kids are too overtly happy--giggling, smiling, joking. They view this as a real problem, perhaps an indicator of what we would call mental illness. No way I could have known this while passing through, casually entertaining the local kids (as I do) by offering rides or teaching juggling.

Another thing I've heard all over the world from parents is that outsiders--tourists, including you and I--barge into town showing their kids that traditional or homegrown ways of life are inferior to tourist ways. What are you really teaching by riding the kids around on your motorbike? What do their parents think you're teaching? Sometimes the local people are far more sophisticated about the value systems brought by tourists than are the tourists themselves.

YMMV, but I think these things are worth keeping in mind.

Mark
Actually you are making the sneering assumptions by assuming you know what I saw. (What angers us most about others is what angers us most about ourselves.) So that tells me that you do a lot of barging and drawing conclusions without knowing much about what you are talking about.

Maybe you think your experience in a particular region of West Africa makes you an authority on what transpires on the rest of the continent-but you kind of sound like the typical "arrogant American expert." I did witness many times, parents instructing their children to beg from Westerners. This is why I switched gears and took our encounter to another level. Sorry if my methods don't meet your expectations.

My role was not to teach anyone anything, but rather to learn from those I encounter. You obviously have some strong opinions that appear based on your own foolish behavior and arrogant attitude of "teaching those you visit." You might try learning more by listening more and talking less. Because you made a number of dumb mistakes does not mean that others have also. YMMV but I think these things are worth keeping in mind.
__________________
EARTH RIDE!
Understanding the world through adventure travel.
www.strikingviking.net

Reply With Quote
  #103  
Old 12 Dec 2012
Super Moderator
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: bellingham, WA, USA
Posts: 1,973
Quote:
Originally Posted by strikingviking View Post
....that tells me that you do a lot of barging and drawing conclusions without knowing much about what you are talking about....you kind of sound like the typical "arrogant American expert....." ....You obviously have some strong opinions that appear based on your own foolish behavior and arrogant attitude of "teaching those you visit...." Because you made a number of dumb mistakes does not mean that others have also.
Ah, Glenn, you're sneering again. Too bad.

If you are reporting what you saw, I'd be happy to hear about it: e.g., "I did witness many times, parents instructing their children to beg from Westerners." I've never seen this, and if you have that makes it worth my knowing about.

If you're reporting what you imagine to be true, that's less valuable. Same goes for me reporting what I have seen and heard firsthand (about begging, about the influence of Western outsiders on local children) vs. what I imagine to be true. So much the worse for you, for I, and for anyone else listening.

I found your tone in this post sneering and disrespectful of the people into whose lives you'd inserted yourself. Take it for what it's worth to you.

Thanks for your response. I'll think about it carefully, of course.

Mark
Reply With Quote
  #104  
Old 12 Dec 2012
strikingviking's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Mazatlan, Mexico
Posts: 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by markharf View Post
Ah, Glenn, you're sneering again. Too bad.

If you are reporting what you saw, I'd be happy to hear about it: e.g., "I did witness many times, parents instructing their children to beg from Westerners." I've never seen this, and if you have that makes it worth my knowing about.

If you're reporting what you imagine to be true, that's less valuable. Same goes for me reporting what I have seen and heard firsthand (about begging, about the influence of Western outsiders on local children) vs. what I imagine to be true. So much the worse for you, for I, and for anyone else listening.

I found your tone in this post sneering and disrespectful of the people into whose lives you'd inserted yourself. Take it for what it's worth to you.

Thanks for your response. I'll think about it carefully, of course.

Mark
I'm trying to find the place where I requested advice from the chatroom-wiseman on how to write a ride report and I just can't find it anywhere. Maybe you can refer me to your ride report so I can be just like you? Sigh

I also don't remember asking you if you approve of your interpretation of my "tone." You want me to take your comments for what they are worth to me? Given your rambling about what you have no clue, how about nothing? Because you "inserted yourself into other people's cultures" does not mean everyone does. Sorry for your disappointing experiences when trying to "teach" those you encounter.

If you are having difficulties coming to terms with what you don't understand, or someone else's viewpoint, spend a little more time reading and thinking before embarrassing yourself. Now take your meds, and go back to sleep.
__________________
EARTH RIDE!
Understanding the world through adventure travel.
www.strikingviking.net

Reply With Quote
  #105  
Old 12 Dec 2012
strikingviking's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Mazatlan, Mexico
Posts: 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by markharf View Post
I dunno man,
Your most brilliant quote yet...
__________________
EARTH RIDE!
Understanding the world through adventure travel.
www.strikingviking.net

Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How to use Google Earth Plus? ilesmark Navigation - Maps, Compass, GPS 1 26 Nov 2008 21:35
T4A on Google Earth Chris Scott Sahara Travel Forum 4 28 Jun 2008 17:15
What on Google Earth is that? Bernard Navigation - Maps, Compass, GPS 15 4 Oct 2006 15:28
google earth GottaGo Route Planning 5 21 Apr 2006 03:17
Google Earth Desert Rat Route Planning 2 14 Jul 2005 11:23

 
 


HU DVD Summer Special!

Now that summer is here, get On the Road! Take 30% off the Achievable Dream - On the Road! 2-DVD set until August 31 only. Get On the Road! Learn the tips to staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure!

Our veteran travellers share their tips (and great stories) for staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure.

"A fantastic, informative and inspirational DVD."

"It's brilliant - thank you very much!"

Check it out at the HU Store! Remember to use Coupon Code 'ONTHEROAD' on your order when you checkout.


Renedian Adventures

What others say about HU...

"I just wanted to say thanks for doing this and sharing so much with the rest of us." Dave, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the DVD series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring! The new look of the website is very impressive, updated and catchy. Thank you so very much!" Jennifer, Canada

"...Great site. Keep up the good work." Murray and Carmen, Australia

"We just finished a 7 month 22,000+ mile scouting trip from Alaska to the bottom of Chile and I can't tell you how many times we referred to your site for help. From how to adjust your valves, to where to stay in the back country of Peru. Horizons Unlimited was a key player in our success. Motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world are in debt to your services." Alaska Riders

contest pic

10th Annual HU Travellers Photo Contest is on now! This is an opportunity for YOU to show us your best photos and win prizes!

NEW! HU 2014 Adventure Travel T-shirts! are now available in several colors! Be the first kid on your block to have them! New lower prices on synths!

HU 2014 T-shirts now in!

Check out the new Gildan Performance cotton-feel t-shirt - 100% poly, feels like soft cotton!


What turns you on to motorcycle travel?


Global Rescue, WORLDwide evacuation services for EVERYONE

Global Rescue is the premier provider of medical, security and evacuation services worldwide and is the only company that will come to you, wherever you are, and evacuate you to your home hospital of choice. Additionally, Global Rescue places no restrictions on country of citizenship - all nationalities are eligible to sign-up!


New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80 G/S motorcycle.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events (22 this year!); we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, the HUBB or to receive the e-zine. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.


Books & DVDs

amazon

All the best travel books and videos listed and often reviewed on HU's famous Books page. Check it out and get great travel books from all over the world.


Motorcycle Express for shipping and insurance!

Motorcycle Express

MC Air Shipping, (uncrated) USA / Canada / Europe and other areas. Be sure to say "Horizons Unlimited" to get your $25 discount on Shipping!
Insurance - see: For foreigners traveling in US and Canada and for Americans and Canadians traveling in other countries, then mail it to MC Express and get your HU $15 discount!




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 18:07.