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-   -   Overland UK- OZ in a 2wd ???? (http://www.horizonsunlimited.com/hubb/other-4wd-overland-tech/overland-uk-oz-in-2wd-48161)

jimed 1 Feb 2010 21:59

Overland UK- OZ in a 2wd ????
 
Hi all,

HELP, we are in the buying process of a campervan for our overland trip.

Yes we would love a 4x4 camper but they are like rocking horse s**t and when you do find them they are too expensive for us.
I know there are the hi-ace and bongo vans etc but they are a bit short on space for us.

The reason for a camper vs 4x4 landy or the like is mainly the creature comforts and we figure that we would be more inclinded to stay nearly all nights in it rather than end up in guest houses as some overlanders with the roof tent or camping end up doing !!!.

Here is the link for one I am looking at
http://finance.autoexposure.co.uk/pd...0210083623.pdf

Do you think a 2wd would make it ok ?
Prob going the usual Iran-Pak-India route or maybe the Stans and China ?

I did the trip in a commercial overland truck a few years ago and the roads were pretty good really ?

Thanks for your comments.

Jim

DarrenM 2 Feb 2010 00:29

Countries that I have been...

India - no problem on most roads just watch the potholes.

Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore - no problem, good roads everywhere.

Cambodia - rough in places, ok in the dry season.

Australia - just avoid the tracks in the outback, most people using 2wd everywhere else. Hire a 4x4 for Fraser Island.

If you decide to go there, New Zealand - all good and some amazing deserted beaches to park beside and spend the night.

tacr2man 18 May 2010 10:14

Australia 2wd is enough for all bush roads, as they close the roads when they get very muddy, and you can get big fines if you then drive on them.
Beach driving definately 4wd, same with any sand driving.
More relevant to your question is how the motor caravan is constructed, most commercially built common type wont handle the hammering of potholed, or corrugated dirt roads . So a commercial 2wd with a self/custom build interior is a better bet, as you can make sure components are built extra strong. Coachbuilt body same criteria apply .
If you look at what the locals drive in the countries you mention they are predominately 2wd , its only where they need 4wd that you will, which is only a very low percentage of destinations. HTSH

CornishDeity 18 May 2010 12:14

With a two wheel drive you can definitely do it ....... and if you are skill, ingenious and hang around people in 4 wheel drive with winches etc then you can go to some really funky places.

Iran will be no problem at all, and although we didn't do southern Pakistan, Northern Pakistan, including the KKH was passable for 2 wheel drive.

Tajikistan and some of Kyrgyzstan would be hard work in a 2 wheel drive, but maybe possible (we went through Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan in convoy with a 1950s Citroen).

Uzbekistan is possible. The small bit of Kazakhstan was very bumpy and could be hard on a 2wd - the Citroen made it, but did have a lot of trouble.

I couldn't get to your link, but I would say you will defo make it to 95% of the places you need to go to, but the other 5% are usually very interesting! But if a 2wd is your only option, then go for it!!!!!!!!

Iron_mighty07 19 May 2010 18:50

I continually have similar thoughts on 2WD both for Africa and one day UK to Oz. Travelling reasonably light with the right sort of modifications(higher profile tyres(40mm rolling diameter increase so extra 20mm) / LSD(Manufacturers optional extra)) should get to many places you'd want to go. I've been looking at a Volvo 940 Est,for this very purpose - risky I accept as the spares support outside Europe/USA is poor but then again travelling light means you can carry the important gear and abandon the rest if needed.

Biggest concern I have is overstressing the monocoque bodyshell, which may lead to cracks in critical areas, and the second is fuel, diesel conversion is obvious but the standard VW isn't the best and using Merc or LR conversions would create a truly unique failure point(however as per the Field of Dream mantra "if you build it......" is the only way to trial and test,plus there are plenty of pay to play off road courses locally to trial modifications at...:rolleyes2:

goodwoodweirdo 21 May 2010 11:33

[quote=Iron_mighty07;289567I've been looking at a Volvo 940 Est,for this very purpose - risky I accept as the spares support outside Europe/USA is poor but then again travelling light means you can carry the important gear and abandon the rest if needed.[/quote]

Off topic I know but how about a Subaru Forester.....

RussG 21 May 2010 22:41

Proper Engineering
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Iron_mighty07 (Post 289567)
I continually have similar thoughts on 2WD both for Africa and one day UK to Oz. Travelling reasonably light with the right sort of modifications(higher profile tyres(40mm rolling diameter increase so extra 20mm) / LSD(Manufacturers optional extra)) should get to many places you'd want to go. I've been looking at a Volvo 940 Est,for this very purpose - risky I accept as the spares support outside Europe/USA is poor but then again travelling light means you can carry the important gear and abandon the rest if needed.

Biggest concern I have is overstressing the monocoque bodyshell, which may lead to cracks in critical areas, and the second is fuel, diesel conversion is obvious but the standard VW isn't the best and using Merc or LR conversions would create a truly unique failure point(however as per the Field of Dream mantra "if you build it......" is the only way to trial and test,plus there are plenty of pay to play off road courses locally to trial modifications at...:rolleyes2:

No matter where I’ve been there’s always loads of these:thumbup1:
Best W123 shots - a set on Flickr

Iron_mighty07 22 May 2010 10:05

Apoloigies to Jimed for the thread hijack, original question was answered that it was possible with care so I'll open a separate thread details what's in my mind for a 2WD car based overland/cross over vehicle - but will just add the Mercedes option would be sensible but the amateur engineer in me has the craving to do it that little bit different even if that introduces the inevitable risk elements! Cheers!

kamil 1 Jul 2010 21:49

Hi,

did you think about Mitsubishi Delica? Great big simple car.
We are planning RTW trip with Delica.
delica | Delica Easter/Velikonoce – rajce.net

[url=http://www.mdocuk.co.uk/forums/index.php]Mitsubishi Delica Owners Club UK

nickyu 30 Sep 2011 03:03

Quote:

Originally Posted by jimed (Post 274565)
Hi all,

HELP, we are in the buying process of a campervan for our overland trip.

.......

Do you think a 2wd would make it ok ?
Prob going the usual Iran-Pak-India route or maybe the Stans and China ?

Thanks for your comments.

Jim

We met up with Colin and Chrissy in Turkey on their way from the UK to OZ. (We were heading north from Africa). They were in a Ford Transit Van that was converted for living. Of course they had issues, but none to do with 2WD. The biggest problem was getting parts when the fuel pump broke down in Laos or to do with the fact that this Transit was custom fitted so he could drive it (he is in a wheel chair).

Driving Chrissy Home

Check out their blog.
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-beJ0cu0nMZ...CIMG7646v2.JPG

Bertrand 30 Sep 2011 09:23

Something to encourage us all
 
1 Attachment(s)
Commercial pressures push us to buy the latest gadget and wonder if our state-of-the-art modern vehicles can ever make it out of the country without falling apart.
I came across this photo that I really enjoy.
The first car to make it overland from the UK to Australia in..... 1927!
enjoy!:thumbup1:

ilesmark 30 Sep 2011 10:52

If you can do it in a Citroen ZX you can do it in anything!

Drive to Singapore from London and back

nomadic 5 Oct 2011 21:57

Couldn't open the link. I've met several people in Pakistan / India with commercial (plastic) campers (Hymer, Knaus, Dethlefs) with considerable damage to the living unit. One had a large rip from back to steering cabin caused by torsion / flex in the chassis. Leakage is the second problem - small cracks in the roof caused by torsion etc.

Though metal bodies like on the Ford Transit, VW LT 28, Benz 207D, 307D, VW Vario etc can take a massive beating.

Cheers!
Arno

ilesmark 6 Oct 2011 09:30

Try this one - www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/article2240497.ece or this one - http://www.metro.co.uk/weird/537794-...km-to-far-east

Agree re the plastic campervans comment. Most of my trip didn't require 4x4, but I still went for a 4x4 because 4x4 transmission seemingly brings with it stronger build - which a lot of the roads I travelled DID need!

tacr2man 7 Oct 2011 14:18

4X4 is good to get thru on occasions in an easier fashion!
A metal bodied , or commercial body ( ie built for goods use) 2WD is more than adequate for 95% of the time , unless going thru sand for long distances.
It needs to be separate chassis , with good ground clearance . The second can quite often be enhanced by fitting a "taller" tyre eg going from 265/75r16 to 255/85R16 . Rear wheel drive is generally a better option for simplification of drive train and better traction when hill climbing. Fitting a diff lock to the single drive axle gives a tremendous increase in traction , and a set of tyre chains will further enhance this to standard 4X4 levels in mud !
Modern coachbuilt motorcaravans are in nearly all cases totally unsuitable for off tarmac use . They are built very much inside very limiting weight constraints, and as such are engineered for a "light" usage only .
When using commercial 2wd vehicles you must "derate" them for this type of usage, this means if your "kit" and personnel needs 1.5 ton carrying capacity van then do it with a 3 ton capacity vehicle. This is due to the commercial vehicle in most cases also being designed and engineered for on highway use . By following this policy the vehicle is much less "stressed" and will usually suffer far less wear and breakages HTSH


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