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Northern Asia Topics specific to Russia, Central Asia (also known as "the 'stans"), Mongolia, Japan and Korea
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  #1  
Old 11 Dec 2008
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fuel range

what fuel range am i looking at needing for the stans, russia, mongolia and the road of bones?
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  #2  
Old 11 Dec 2008
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In Mongolia I travelled the complete circle following what you would call the 'main' roads. I found you could buy petrol every 200kms. There is a good map you can buy that the post office which shows you all the towns with fuel stations (in English or Mongolia)

In Russia again I followed the main road from Vladivostok to Moscow - I found there were petrol stations every 200kms I think max. 250kms.

Everyone I met on the road raised their eyebrows at me with my 14l tank. I did have to stop more often, but that's when you start interacting with the locals and having fun!

There is also a Russian map that shows petrol stations ( i think you buy this at most petrol stations, car shops or car markets)
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Old 12 Dec 2008
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I would definitely not count on every 200km if you get off the "main roads" in Mongolia. And likewise for the Kolyma "Highway". When some Australians did it recently in 4WDs there was only 1 fuel stop in between Yakutsk and Magadan (2000km). So for that road you need a lot of fuel range.

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Old 12 Dec 2008
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I only managed to travel as far as Maqat in Kazakhstan earlier this year but found fuel no problem at all.

Travelling on a bike with only a 14 litre fuel tank (500cc Royal Enfield) I found fuel easily every half tank or so. I think the biggest fill up was 11 litres but that was only once. TBH, autogas seemed to be even more readily available.

The main thing to be aware of is that from Russia on you tend to find that the petrol stations require cash payment up front, so you have to tell them how many litres you want. It's a pain, but you soon get very good at judging how much fuel you've used.
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Old 16 Dec 2008
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If you say 'Polni Bak' (full tank)and hand over more money than you think you require go back to your bike and fill your tank up. Hang up the pump and go back to the shop. They then will give you your change.

If you ask for 10l and only fit 8l into your tank return to the counter with your receipt and collect your change.
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Old 16 Dec 2008
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Originally Posted by maximondo View Post
If you say 'Polni Bak' (full tank)and hand over more money than you think you require go back to your bike and fill your tank up. Hang up the pump and go back to the shop. They then will give you your change.

If you ask for 10l and only fit 8l into your tank return to the counter with your receipt and collect your change.
Just be careful with really old pumps. The situation may have changed in the 5 years since I have been to Russia, but in a few places the pump was started and stopped by the guy at the window. I had no control of the gasoline flow at all and overflowed once or twice.
Most pumps did work 'right'. But if the pump looks ancient, you may want to check first!
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Old 17 Dec 2008
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I rode a DRZ400 with a 4 gallon (16 liter) tank, and had a 1 gallon backup plastic container, with he DRZ getting about 50-55 mpg.

I was fine through Russia (riding the Trans-Siberian Hwy, not the Road of Bones), Mongolia and Europe.

Once got poor quality gas outside of Ulan Bator in Mongolia. The backup plastic container came in handy - had to dump what was in the tank, but was able to make it to the next gas station on the 1 gallon of backup fuel. So it's a good idea to have a separate backup tank for situations like that.
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  #8  
Old 17 Dec 2008
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with he DRZ getting about 50-55 mpg
That's good mileage. My "E" only does 40 mpg(ish) Maybe I need to look into that or perhaps learn to relax my right hand.
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Old 17 Dec 2008
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The 400E has a higher performance (thirstier) carb and it is geared differently.
I also had a smaller rear sprocket by which made highway cruising easier, and helped with gas.

You're right - the good gas mileage was achieved, in retrospect, riding at about 60mph.
At higher rpms the bike does get thirsty.
Packing light helps, and I am 160 lbs.

Last edited by Traveldog; 19 Dec 2008 at 21:26.
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Old 18 Dec 2008
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Originally Posted by Skorpion660 View Post
I only managed to travel as far as Maqat in Kazakhstan earlier this year but found fuel no problem at all.

Travelling on a bike with only a 14 litre fuel tank (500cc Royal Enfield) I found fuel easily every half tank or so. I think the biggest fill up was 11 litres but that was only once. TBH, autogas seemed to be even more readily available.

The main thing to be aware of is that from Russia on you tend to find that the petrol stations require cash payment up front, so you have to tell them how many litres you want. It's a pain, but you soon get very good at judging how much fuel you've used.
But then, 14 litres in an Enfield is usually worth 20 litres in other bikes
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Old 18 Dec 2008
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In Mongolia you'll find 80 octane fuel in almost all small settlements. In towns (pop more than 10.000) you'll find 93 octane. In the west it can be 400-450km between these towns. Around UB you might even find 93 in smaller settlements. The smaller settlements are usually 100km apart, but sometimes it can be up to 200km apart. Look at a map and you'll see it more clearly. There is some maps that show where there is fuel, but just by looking at the size of the settlement/town you'll know after a few days...

Fortunately I had a 26 liter tank on my KTM which came in handy. Specially a day where a gas station in a settlement I thought would have some gas was closed/empty...
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Old 19 Dec 2008
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Dont know about the road of bones Ewan but I can confirm that a 300km range will suffice in 99% of the countries you plan to go.
As stated Eastern Mongolia can be a problem, I found Western Mongolia OK on my Suzuki 250 Djebel, just.
Carry 3-5litres in a jerry on the stages you are unsure about.

Dont stress too much, what ever range you have you will work something out to get through the long patches.
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Old 19 Dec 2008
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Thumbs up Fuel for Russia.

G'Day Ali,

We did Mongolia and Russia to Vladivostok in September. A 300km range would be sufficient, 400km would be better. My 2 friends did the Kolyma Highway to Magadan at the same time. If you e-mail me I will pass on their e-mail addresses.

Regards,
Chris.
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