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  #1  
Old 7 Jun 2010
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Bike recommendation to buy in U.S

I'm looking to do a first time motorbike trip (Pan Am) and I was hoping I might get some recommendations.



I'm from the U.K and it was suggested I buy a Yamaha 660 Tenere, however as I understand it they are not imported into the States so I'm wondering what can I buy in the States that fits the bill.

I'd like to get a reliable bike for one person which will hold up to South American unpleasant road conditions, with good spare parts availability.

In my perfect world I'd get a bike for $3000 U.S so if the worst came to the worst and it was stolen I wouldn't be losing too much. I realise a Tenere would have cost much more.

To me the bike is just a means of transport so I'm not bothered about having a 'cool' machine.

Comfort is not a major priority as I'm not the sort of person who wants to do huge daily mileage.

I'd prefer something relatively economical but also big enough to load up with camping gear and fairly bulky photographic equipment.

I'm at the early stages of planning my trip but it would help to have some idea what to start Googling.

Many thanks
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  #2  
Old 7 Jun 2010
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I would say a KLR-650.
I have one that I would sell.
A good friend of mine has one he would sell, they are all over the place.
Easy to find parts and help at KLR650.NET - Your Kawasaki KLR650 Resource! - The Original KLR650 Forum! - Forums Home
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  #3  
Old 7 Jun 2010
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Dr650

Hey mate,
Look into Bikes for sale here on HU, There's a guy in Connecticut (north Eastern USA) selling a Suziuki DR650, fully prepped for Adventure touring. $2850.00 (£2000.00)

Somethin you may be interested in as all the hard work of prep will be done and paid for. Teneres aren't available over there and the DR is a good bike.
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  #4  
Old 7 Jun 2010
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buying a bike in US

Hi



Finding a bike to buy is not problem, just beware which State you buy it in because some wont let a foreigner buy a bike, see my notes om Buying a bike in Pennsylnaia. The owner has had to sell it my my American friend in Michigan and we arr 90% sure I can transfer it into my name ther but that may have changed by the time I get there!
cheers
Linda
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  #5  
Old 8 Jun 2010
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If you are planning on doing the PanAm and not planning on doing the desert sections, as you mention you are a new rider, maybe a Vstrom would be more suitable, it is slightly more road user freindly and they can be found quite cheap as well.

They are very reliable, I know this because I did the full road north to south with one. I bought it in the states, sold it in BsAs to another american

Cheers
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  #6  
Old 8 Jun 2010
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Thanks guys

Thanks a lot for your replies. It's too early for me to be contacting people regarding buying their bikes as I would intend starting from Prudhoe in mid June 2011.

I bought a car in California last year so I'm aware of the state to state issues.

TravellingStrom, you may have misunderstood me, I totally intend to do the desert sections. I just reckon I can hack some discomfort. I rode a bicycle to China in 07 that was off the scale uncomfortable.

Thanks to all.
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  #7  
Old 8 Jun 2010
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If you haven't already done so, check out KLR650.NET - Your Kawasaki KLR650 Resource! KLR650 Forums, Photos, Mods & KLR Tech as your one-stop source for everything about the KLR650. Don't own one, but if I were doing that trip that would be the first bike I would look at.

One word of advice on dealing with U.S. state registration, etc., is don't believe everything you hear, even from employees at these locations. Google and seek out the actual state regulations on your particular problem. More than once I've had to point out the actual law to state employees who don't know any better. They handle lots of people and 99.9% of the time the situation is routine, so when someone shows up with something out of the ordinary (like a foreign owner) they don't know what to do. Each state has different regulations on these things. One other thing is to ask to speak to a manager if you are getting nowhere. They can often override some silly little glitch that is holding up your paperwork. Be polite, friendly, and treat them with respect, and that will get you a long way.
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  #8  
Old 8 Jun 2010
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Sanfairyanne

Problem solved

If you want to start in Alaska then buy your bike in Alaska. That's what I'm doing. I start next month. Go to Motorcycle Tours Around the World | MotoQuest Tours They have been very helpful and will sell you a bike and help you with the paperwork.
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  #9  
Old 8 Jun 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wuwei View Post
One other thing is to ask to speak to a manager if you are getting nowhere. They can often override some silly little glitch that is holding up your paperwork. Be polite, friendly, and treat them with respect, and that will get you a long way.
Good advice.

As far as a bike goes I like the idea of buying a bike already prepped and set up for travel. Lots of little things to do with whatever bike you get. Doing all these things yourself can take time and money. Getting a "ready to ride" bike, even one with a few more miles, can be worth it, IMHO.

If you leave on a bike not prepped it's possible you'll get stuck on down the road in places where getting parts/service might take time and cost more money. Don't neglect handguards (bark busters), skid plate, light weight racks or stand-offs for soft bags. A good seat may not seem important now, but trust me, it will be. The DR650 stock seat is a torture rack, the KLR is better. But most wise owners replace stock seats. As a bicyclist you are no doubt "work hardened" in the right areas. But still, a nice seat really helps the experience.

The Kawasaki KLR650 or Suzuki DR650 are both excellent bikes and not expensive. Good supply of used ones here in California within your price range. Or you can buy new. You will need a local address where you can receive mail.

Even if the Yamaha 660 Tenere' was sold here, it would likely cost in the $7500 to $8000 range, new. The DR and KLR both go for "about" $5500 new, on the road. Some have paid under $5000 for new DR650.

I've owned both the above bikes and prefer the DR. But just did a 3 day, 1000 mile rough dual sport weekend with my buddy on his KLR. He did great, even through lots of deep mud holes and steep downhill nastiness.

So never under estimate a well set up KLR. Later in the ride my buddy locked the front tire under hard braking going into a corner and hit the ground .... hard. He got some abrasions but the KLR was totally FINE. No damage. My DR is the same way. It crashes very well. No radiators to break, no cooling hoses to snag or water pumps to fail. The DR is simple to service and simple to work on, better access than the KLR.

Have fun!
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  #10  
Old 8 Jun 2010
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First, should find where you can buy a bike being foraigner, then find the bike. Otherwise, you will loose time and money. You need the bike under your name or won´t go anywhere.

I bought mine in Florida, the easiest state to purchase a bike being non US citizen. Just a postal address needed. And money, of course. Preferibly good notes, people do not like fake ones, God only knows why.

Think twice before buying an old machine for such a long trip... if you are not a good mechanic you may stay longer beside the road than on it.

Good luck.

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  #11  
Old 9 Jun 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sanfairyanne View Post
TravellingStrom, you may have misunderstood me, I totally intend to do the desert sections. I just reckon I can hack some discomfort. I rode a bicycle to China in 07 that was off the scale uncomfortable.

Thanks to all.
I took the information supplied in another thread by you, as being a brand new motorcycle rider, to mean you have never ridden a motorbike before. So, I was unsure what actual prep you were going to do prior to your trip and thought road riding would be hard enough, until you were familiar with that before venturing into the dirt, but I could have taken the wrong impression from that post.

Riding a bicycle is not the same as riding a motorbike with the extra gear and weight disadvantages. That said, lot's of people have done it so why not eh
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  #12  
Old 9 Jun 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sanfairyanne View Post
I'm looking to do a first time motorbike trip (Pan Am) and I was hoping I might get some recommendations.



I'm from the U.K and it was suggested I buy a Yamaha 660 Tenere, however as I understand it they are not imported into the States so I'm wondering what can I buy in the States that fits the bill.

I'd like to get a reliable bike for one person which will hold up to South American unpleasant road conditions, with good spare parts availability.

In my perfect world I'd get a bike for $3000 U.S so if the worst came to the worst and it was stolen I wouldn't be losing too much. I realise a Tenere would have cost much more.

To me the bike is just a means of transport so I'm not bothered about having a 'cool' machine.

Comfort is not a major priority as I'm not the sort of person who wants to do huge daily mileage.

I'd prefer something relatively economical but also big enough to load up with camping gear and fairly bulky photographic equipment.

I'm at the early stages of planning my trip but it would help to have some idea what to start Googling.

Many thanks

I have two for sale: A 1988 XT600 in excellent shape for $1500 and a 2007 DL650 Vstrom also in excellent condition for $4250 with engine guards, hand guards, and givi racks. If either of those would work for you, I'll pick you up at the Indianapolis,IN airport.
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  #13  
Old 10 Jun 2010
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cheap ride

As others have suggested, the main choices are the KLR and The DR 650's.
Unless you want to go smaller-more economical or burn up the highways faster with a twin, these two are the ones. An optional more dirt worthy choice is the XRL 650 Honda, but you'd need a bigger tank for sure on it. Also the range is somewhat limited on the DR 650.

Fuel range is generally not a concern with the KLR. Stock tank on it will give 250 miles or so before hitting reserve. I have an IMS tank on mine and can go 300 miles before reserve and when I run it dry on reserve, there is a "secret reserve" if you will lay the bike on its side left bar down you get 10 miles more!
The after market is strong for both the KLR and the DR.The KLR comes standard with a larger rear rack.
Price-wise , the KLR is more available and cheaper. There is an '06 with 4000 miles showing for sale in the ADV fleamarket now for $2300.00 THere you go.
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