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Kawasaki Kawasaki Tech Forum - For Questions specific and of interest to Kawasaki riders only. Questions comparing which bike is best etc go in the "Which Bike" forum.
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  #1  
Old 18 May 2002
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Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: montana/texas usa
Posts: 41
klr fixins for south america? HELP a novice!

guys,im leaving on oct 1 but want to fix up my '99 klr quik so help me out. heres what ive got so far; happy T su rack and alu boxes,hpegs and rad guards, center stand moose bash plate, pvc tool tube on hpeg bar. heres what i'm lookin at doin more; chris krok's sub frame bolts and rear disk guard; new 50/50 tires, metzler sahara 3 or pirelli mt 70 or 60,led flashing turn lites, led brite tail bulb, louder horn, univ vista throt lock, gel grips, hot grips, maier alu guards w/ spoilers (can all fit/work together?), steel shifter, galfer ss b lines, galfer f brake pads, h lite off switch, kp ss oil filt, alu fan blade, moose mag drain plug, visible inline fuel filt, dual star foam air filt, tall shield, prog larry f springs and r spring, superbrace, whats good, whats a waste, and wheres best prices? glenn, why put on diff exhaust and rejet carb? should i carry a gasket set and bearing spares? help !!
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  #2  
Old 19 May 2002
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Location: pto natales
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You didn't indicate where in South America you were planning to go, but if Chile and Argentina, then KLR spares are usually available through the larger dealers in major cities. If parts not on hand then they can be ordered and be there in 3-4 days via express means. Best bets are the capital cities for both parts and service. I would not lug around too many spares. Things like H-4 bulbs for the headlamp are available in every city. Perhaps have a spare regulator-rectifier. Have fork seals with you since those tend to wear and leak on dusty road places and can be repaired by someone with the tools who has no parts souce. These seals are actually made in Argentina but with triple lip seals and they are apparently slightly too thick to seat properly so bring good versions yerself. Due to the devaluation of the Argentine peso parts are less expensive there now (May 2002) than in other parts of South America. If in a bind and your particular part is not available, use your previous arrangement with a good US dealer who will ship via DHL (do NOT try using UPS International for express shipment to South America - experience says they are incompetent). Carry a spare set of brake pads for both ends and start with absolutely new pads before setting out. Forget the bearing spares but if too many miles on that 1999 model you may with to consider preventive installation of new rear wheel bearings (mine went bad while in Argentina, with about 16,000 miles on the 1997 KLR).Install the Sagebrush Engineering balancer chain tensioner adjuster before you go and learn how to do that adjustment on schedule. For longer wearing tires consider Avon Gripsters since the MT70 and Enduro3 will only give you about 4-5000 miles, depending on road conditions. Don't forget the Acerbis Rally Pro brush guards with aluminum bar. Your planning should include finding a list of dealers in the countries you plan to visit. There are online Paginas Amarillas - yellow pages. Learn the names of parts. You have time. Motorcycle oil is about $5 a quart/litre in Argentina and Chile so try to change in the tax-free zone of Iquique if you have the chance. Hope some of that helps. Look us up in Puerto Natales at the bike rental place on Blanco Encalado street in Puerto Natales, in Chilean Patagonia. We have an excellent mechanic available.
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Old 21 May 2002
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Location: Chicago, IL, USA
Posts: 233
Most of that stuff is all well and good but you could do with out a lot of it if budget a problem. Here's what I've found:

1) Better shifter is a must.
2) Acerbis guards aren't that great. I took mine off as they were a bigger problem if you crash hard. Spare brake and clutch levers are cheap and easy to pack. and the stock guards offer better wind/water protection. If you're worried about bending levers, leave the clamps a 'little loose' so they give in the event of a crash.
2) The big hard cases are all well and good but if you carry much weight in them your asking for sever stability problems. They are big and hang out a fair distance from the bike. I've watch other KLR's with them going down a bumpy road and it looks like they are twisting the whole bike frame.
3) Don't ask much from the stock electrical system. Handgrips OR heated vest, not both.
4) An acrilic headlight guard is a very good idea.
5) Magnetic compasses don't work while mounted on the bike.
6) Be very careful about the counter balancer tensioner.
7) It's a great bike.]

Kurt
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  #4  
Old 21 May 2002
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Oh and...

1) Pelican boxes make good top boxes. Not too big or heavy though....
2) Tank bags don't work, but tank panniers do.

Kurt
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  #5  
Old 21 May 2002
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I disagree with the comment of compasses on a bike. They are invaluable on back roads in stange territory. Buy an adjustable compass meant for mounting in an automobile. Install and adjust according to directions. Now these things are not meant for orientiering competition, but they do just fine for general directions.

Regards,

John


Quote:
Originally posted by Kurt:
Most of that stuff is all well and good but you could do with out a lot of it if budget a problem. Here's what I've found:

5) Magnetic compasses don't work while mounted on the bike.

Kurt
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  #6  
Old 23 May 2002
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The compass I have, (not a cheap one either), can not be adjusted to overcome the metal of the bike (gas tank primarily) or the electrical field generated (by a very sloppy rectifier/voltage regulater). It is easily removable, but given I have to take it off the bike, it would have been cheaper to just get a pocket compass. Yes compasses are handy: That and a good map are all you need.

Kurt
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