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  • 1 Post By backofbeyond
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  #1  
Old 21 Jun 2013
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Touring with the new Honda double clutch transmission

Good morning,
I am new to this forum and have not ridden a motorcycle since 1960 and 8 years ago I fell very ill with a incurable sickness which now has stabilized. I have some deformation of my hands and consider getting a Honda with the DCT transmission, which will save my left hand.
I would also like to go touring alone and would like to hear your opinions on the DCT, the wisdom of going far when you have been ill, what size Honda you recommend, etc; I have looked and sort of fell in love with the 700x with a DCT option.
Tell me what you all think about a 70 year old man taking off!!
Thanks in advance for your advice.
Kindly
SKPhoto13
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  #2  
Old 22 Jun 2013
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I'm not sure age per se is the issue - at 62 I'm still buzzing around everywhere on two wheels and there's plenty of reports scattered around here of 70+ yr olds doing substantial solo trips - have a look at this link for example - (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Old-Man-Bike...simon+gandolfi

It's more a case of how the years have treated you on the way to 70 - and on a practical point how the insurance companies will treat you when you approach them for cover.

Are you riding at the moment? If you're not and it really is 1960 since you last ventured forth on two wheels it might be an idea to get some miles under your belt on something a bit smaller first. Presumably you have a full bike license and it hasn't been snipped without you noticing it during some previous license renewal.

You mentioned a problem with your clutch hand is steering you towards the Honda but there are many other issues (such as weight) that you also need to consider. These things are heavy. My advice, on the basis of the info in your post, would be to look at some of the twist and go scooters - no clutch problems and loads available second hand to mitigate the financial side of things if it turns out it's not for you.

I'm loath to ask about the medical side of things and any advice you've had from the medical profession re " strenuous activity" but it does need to be considered. Medics by nature tend to take a conservative approach to many problems so there may be a bit of leeway in how closely you adhere to their suggestions but I'd only do it if it was something that impacted on my comfort, not on my life.
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  #3  
Old 22 Jun 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by backofbeyond View Post
I'm not sure age per se is the issue - at 62 I'm still buzzing around everywhere on two wheels and there's plenty of reports scattered around here of 70+ yr olds doing substantial solo trips - have a look at this link for example - (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Old-Man-Bike...simon+gandolfi

It's more a case of how the years have treated you on the way to 70 - and on a practical point how the insurance companies will treat you when you approach them for cover.

Are you riding at the moment? If you're not and it really is 1960 since you last ventured forth on two wheels it might be an idea to get some miles under your belt on something a bit smaller first. Presumably you have a full bike license and it hasn't been snipped without you noticing it during some previous license renewal.

You mentioned a problem with your clutch hand is steering you towards the Honda but there are many other issues (such as weight) that you also need to consider. These things are heavy. My advice, on the basis of the info in your post, would be to look at some of the twist and go scooters - no clutch problems and loads available second hand to mitigate the financial side of things if it turns out it's not for you.

I'm loath to ask about the medical side of things and any advice you've had from the medical profession re " strenuous activity" but it does need to be considered. Medics by nature tend to take a conservative approach to many problems so there may be a bit of leeway in how closely you adhere to their suggestions but I'd only do it if it was something that impacted on my comfort, not on my life.
IMO the above covers the factors.
Your age is but a number, but try telling that to the insurance brokers who work on the basis of statistics.
Scooters have the weight down low, really low; so, size for size, a scooter should be more manageable.
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  #4  
Old 22 Jun 2013
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Originally Posted by Walkabout View Post
IMO the above covers the factors.
Your age is but a number, but try telling that to the insurance brokers who work on the basis of statistics.
Scooters have the weight down low, really low; so, size for size, a scooter should be more manageable.
I totally agree with the above. And IMHO, the modern 250 to 300 cc machines are all you need to get your feet wet. Light, easy to ride, reliable and very light on fuel.

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  #5  
Old 24 Jun 2013
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Originally Posted by tigershel View Post
I totally agree with the above. And IMHO, the modern 250 to 300 cc machines are all you need to get your feet wet. Light, easy to ride, reliable and very light on fuel.

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I am in better shape than you seem to think, so my doctors will not stop me. I need to pass the licence in France first and a med check is obligatory, as well as a course on riding where the Kawa r6 is used. It will show up there;
Obviously a scooter would be easy, but impossible to tour with. I will turn towards the medium weight Trial type bikes from Honda, BMW and Yamaha I think.
Thank you for your kind advice.
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  #6  
Old 24 Jun 2013
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Originally Posted by SKPhoto13 View Post
I am in better shape than you seem to think, so my doctors will not stop me. I need to pass the licence in France first and a med check is obligatory, as well as a course on riding where the Kawa r6 is used. It will show up there;
Obviously a scooter would be easy, but impossible to tour with. I will turn towards the medium weight Trial type bikes from Honda, BMW and Yamaha I think.
Thank you for your kind advice.
I just saw that you had issues with your hands, and was wondering how you would manage the throttle and brake if the clutch was a problem.

I guess a number of us made the same assumption.

Having said that, there is absolutely nothing wrong with going with a scooter, and the 250s are quite capable of backroad touring.

I'm a fair bit younger, in very good shape for my age, and have been riding continuously since '97. I have moved to a 125 and 200 dualsport bikes from much bigger and more powerful machines, and find them a joy from ease of everyday riding and practicality perspectives.

I've toured both 2 up and loaded, the 125 has over 16k km in about a year's worth of riding, and the 200 has over 6k km since December.

Last year I also used a 125 Chinese scooter for a while, and just to run around the area I often used it in preference to the 125 dualsport. Very light weight and easy to ride.

Nothing wrong if you can manage the 700, they are also good bikes.

Just offering another perspective, since I've hit my 50s (60 is not far away), I've been doing more with smaller and smaller bikes. You don't get the ego boost that riding the fastest / biggest / most expensive machine gives, but there are other benefits.

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  #7  
Old 24 Jun 2013
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If I misunderstood the exact nature of the issue with your hands and your health then apologies but I suppose the basic point is still valid - if you're looking for a bike without a manual, pull the lever in, clutch then the Honda you mentioned + a few variants or the vast range of twist and go super scoots just about covers what's available. Don't dismiss some of the bigger scooters though - they're a long way from the 60's Vespas and Lambrettas and you can tour very easily on them over long distances. I'm in the process of planning a coast to coast USA trip with my wife and I seriously started comparing one of the big scooters with a Gold Wing to see whether it would work.

Small can be beautiful as well - I have seven bikes in my garage ranging from 125cc to 1000cc. Guess what I've done most miles on this year - the 125! I have another 2000 mile trip planned for it in Sept.
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  #8  
Old 24 Jun 2013
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Just how good/bad are your hands ??

Some bikes have incredibly light clutches. Almost to the point where you don't even need them at all.

A case of trial and error.
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  #9  
Old 25 Jun 2013
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My dads 400 Burgman will go anywhere you could live without full knobblies. It will tour, day after day, two up, with luggage, faster than some 500cc plus bikes I've owned. Don't let the shape and "sub-litre bikes are for girls" clowns tell you otherwise or get caught up in the Ewan and Charlie stuff. It's the right size, the right spec and proven.

I would rate the DCT as unproven. There is a chap on the "other site" (Advrider SSsshhh, don't say I mentioned THEM) getting the first few thousand miles on one. Could be worth a look, just don't stay long over there or you'll find yourself having an opinion on which shotgun fits best under the seat of a KLR!

Andy
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  #10  
Old 7 Jul 2013
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You can add a hydraulic clutch to just about any bike and that will lighten even the heaviest clutches to be easy. I would look at all bikes that interest you, big or small, then decide if the clutch needs to be lighter and change if so.
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  #11  
Old 7 Jul 2013
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SKPhoto13, if I were you, I would try to borrow or rent a dual clutch Honda and ride it for a day.
Other peoples experience can be usefull but there is nothing better then try it for yourself.
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  #12  
Old 5 Oct 2013
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As the owner of a honda 700x automatic . I say get one they are light durable and well made .i have just returned from the pico,s in northern spain on mine were it performed as well as my friends 1200cc bikes but returned 75 mpg .
I have now put nobblies and a sumpshield on in preparation for a trip to morroco.
Excellent bike. Get a test ride
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