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  #1  
Old 31 Mar 2011
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Changing chains - (Tornado 250)

How often do you guys change chains?

I was initially told every 10k km or so, but after 10k km someone advised that I could just take a link out of the chain to shorten it a bit and all would be fine (it's stretched to the limit where I can adjust it by moving the wheel).

What do you guys think?

Also, as a supplementary question, do you always change the chain and the cogs it's running on at the same time?

Sorry about the naive questions, I'm trying to learn...!

Matt
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Old 31 Mar 2011
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Pull the chain off the rear sprocket at the rear with the chain connected top and bottom. If you can see through the gap between chain and sprocket it is getting time to change the chain.
to judge the wear on the sprockets look at the form of the teeth. If a wide gap has formed between them or they are hooked it is time to change the sprockets. Naturally a complete set of new chain and sprockets is the best combination, but the three things wear differently. You will find you will use a lot more chains than anything else.

On my old 1960's Triumphs I have never had to change a sprocket in over 100,000 miles but got through chains regularly at about 11K miles. It is too early to say on my 'modern' Enfield except the Indian made chains are crap New they are more worn than an Elite chain that has done 3K miles. my current Indian chain has run about 2500 miles from new and is well over half way to oblivion.
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Old 31 Mar 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldbmw View Post
Pull the chain off the rear sprocket at the rear with the chain connected top and bottom. If you can see through the gap between chain and sprocket it is getting time to change the chain.
to judge the wear on the sprockets look at the form of the teeth. If a wide gap has formed between them or they are hooked it is time to change the sprockets. Naturally a complete set of new chain and sprockets is the best combination, but the three things wear differently.
+1 for this.
It's also something you have to learn and judge for yourself.

In times when funds were short, I'd wait until the chain (adjusted as best as it would go) started falling off the rear sprocket on corners. - Can't do that too often in traffic!

Or even earlier times, just wait until it snapped - - go running back down the road to retrieve it and use a couple of spring links to put it back on. But with modern chains though (much heavier than years ago) and lighter-weight modern engine casings, that's a recipe for disaster nowadays.

To save a considerable amount money, make sure it's properly lubricated all the time. Either manually, or Scotoiler or LubeMan, they all work pretty well with ordinary engine oil (or Scotoil in their case).
In my experience, I have learned to avoid the aerosol spray can chain lubricators that squirt out a gooey mess. They attract the dirt and grit which then becomes pretty difficult to wash off and still continues to wear everything away. Using engine oil helps the grit to fly off, and leaves everything a lot easier to clean.

Lastly: You will find you will use a lot more chains than anything else.
I've found that depends on the bike, and whether you use manufacturer's genuine sprockets as replacements. Sometimes they're prohibitively expensive.
Usually I've replaced chain and sprockets together. Sometimes the sprockets are OK, just change the chain.
On the Yamaha I now have, the sprockets wear faster than the chain.
Different engines (singles v multi-cylinders) and different hubs (different cush-drives) wear the transmission in different ways.
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Old 1 Apr 2011
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Tornado 250

Hello,10 to 13k will be about right for a Tornado 250.
(i have this motor)
If you cant judge it yourself have someone with knowledge
look at it.
Good luck!
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Old 1 Apr 2011
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The XR250 Tornado brings Brazilian sprockets and chain. Even when the chain is DID isn’t the same quality than the normal Japanese DID chains. My wife’s Tornado is on the 13000kms and I was the last 3 year adjusting the chain very often. Now before a trip I just change the sprockets and adjust the chain to the near last possibility. I probably will go soon to a new Japanese O’ring DID. Or maybe take of one link, as the sprockets are not really expensive…
As I have here in Buenos Aires many friend with Tornados as commuting bikes or they work as moto-couriers or even take the bikes for travelling, all the reports I have says that the original chain will give you around 12 to 15K, but on a Japanese provably 30K or more, what is logical if you think in the power and weigh that the bike have…
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Old 2 Apr 2011
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Wow - cheers for the advice guys, much appreciated!

(Btw - "just waited until it snapped"?!?! You've bigger cajones than I!)

Using the pull test it looks like the chain needs replacing, and the sprockets aren't so much so I reckon I'll do the lot. I'm about to ride Bolivia to California so I may as well start off with things all sparking and new!

Thanks again!

Matt
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Old 2 Apr 2011
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I usually run chains as a pair, when one needs adjusting swap to the other chain ( very quick) you wont need to adjust it. then when that one needs adjusting do the adjustment and you are ready for a quick swap the next time.

normally the one that is 'resting' gets a good clean and lube ready for refitting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MattOnAMotorbike View Post
Wow - cheers for the advice guys, much appreciated!

(Btw - "just waited until it snapped"?!?! You've bigger cajones than I!)

Using the pull test it looks like the chain needs replacing, and the sprockets aren't so much so I reckon I'll do the lot. I'm about to ride Bolivia to California so I may as well start off with things all sparking and new!

Thanks again!

Matt
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