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Equipping the Bike - what's the best gear? Anything to do with the bikes equipment, saddlebags, etc. Questions on repairs and maintenance of the bike itself belong in the Brand Specific Tech Forums.
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Giant Loop Motorcycle Saddlebags & Motorcycle Tank Bags: Panniers, Soft Luggage for Adventure & Sport Touring

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  #1  
Old 26 Oct 2004
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which spare tubes?

Although we're travelling on tubeless tyres, we want to take some spare tubes along. Storage space is limited though, I don't really want to pack four different tubes, if I can help it.

Our tyre dimensionen are (front, rear):

bike 1: 110/80-18, 150/70-17
bike 2: 110/70-17, 130/70-17

Tubes are flexible and tolerant, they say. A near fit is good enough in case of emergency, right?

If this is correct, which tube dimensions should we take along at least ?

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  #2  
Old 27 Oct 2004
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130/70-17
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Old 27 Oct 2004
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Are you sure the 130/70-17 can be used in all four tyres? I'm wondering.

In all cases but the 110/70-17 tyre, the 130/70-17 tube would be either a perfect fit or a minor stretch. So far so good.

But Is it really feasible to cram a 130/70-17 tube into a smaller (110/70-17) tyre without major problems?


[This message has been edited by ghorian (edited 26 October 2004).]

[This message has been edited by ghorian (edited 26 October 2004).]
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Old 27 Oct 2004
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No, you say “which tube dimensions should we take along at least ?” and I only suggested the middle range.
But I have the Pirelli catalog and there says:
Tube MD17 Tire: 5.10-17 130/90-17 140/80-17 130/80-17 160/70-17 150/70-17 140/70-17 160/60-17
Tube MC17 Tire: 4.00-17 4.60-17 120/90-17 110/90-17 120/80-17 110/80-17 130/70-17 120/70-17

Both of them can be fit in your tires sizes only taking a lot of care on the 110/70-17 and the 110/80-18 but like you say: “good enough in case of emergency”
If you don’t be sure take all sizes, better for my responsibility!!!!



[This message has been edited by javkap (edited 26 October 2004).]
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Old 29 Oct 2004
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I know tubeless tyres deflate a lot slower than tubes (and aren't affected if the tyre creeps around the rim) but otherwise I can't see what the advantages are for an overlander. If you get a puncture on or near the sidewall you can't repair the tyre and you're stuffed. Tubes can be repaired regardless where the puncture is.

Second opinion?

How about fitting the tubes in your tubeless tyres? Easy way to carry them... (but I've not done this so maybe someone else can come up with a good reason why not).

For a short trip I'd just take a spare rear tube, pucture repair kit and valve cores. The rear wheel is much more stressed (and important) because it carries the majority of the load and drives the bike. In comparison the front is relatively low-stressed and in an emergency can be stuffed with clothes or whatever.

My 2 pence...

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Old 29 Oct 2004
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From my experience (on road only) you get a lot less punctures with tubeless.

I've been riding bikes with TL for years. Just bought a Suzi DR and already have a puncture in the front.

Wouldn't want to go back to tubes and chains, but I have to...

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Old 31 Oct 2004
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BANG....there goes a tire. by the time you get stopped on your loaded bike the tire has come unseated from the rim. How are you going to seat the bead with a tire pump of low volume. Maybe the starting fluid and a match and the loud noise but I have personally caught tires on fire doing that. I would have a tube for all tires if I was going any place off the busy track. A bit smaller tube is fine, just don't use too large of tube and end up with a fold because it will wear thru and leak.
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Old 2 Nov 2004
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Hmmm, whenever I had punctures on tubeless tyres the tyre stayed on the rim. Even a rear, completely deflated (large hole, the mushroom-type bung shot past me when I re-inflated the tyre properly!).

That is exactly another safety feature of tubeless rims (not necessarily the tyre, though).

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  #9  
Old 29 Oct 2005
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Without looking at the exact tire sizes you mentioned, this general advice is good to follow:
1) A slightly smaller tube will fit into a larger tire, but not viceversa.
2) A slightly smaller tube will inflate to occupy the space inside the larger tire. Viceversa might pinch it.
3) A smaller tube (and lots of lubricant) will aid in reseating the tire on the the rim.

So if in doubt, opt for the smallest tube that will work on both tires.


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Old 30 Oct 2005
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Quote:
Originally posted by beddhist:
Hmmm, whenever I had punctures on tubeless tyres the tyre stayed on the rim. Even a rear, completely deflated (large hole, the mushroom-type bung shot past me when I re-inflated the tyre properly!).
That is exactly another safety feature of tubeless rims (not necessarily the tyre, though).
Agreed, i've never had a tubeless tire break the bead after going flat...hmmm, wouldn't that be nice I also agree tubeless tires are more puncture resistant, and much easier to fix. Most punctures are in the tread, not the sidewall. Always carry spare front and rear tubes in the event you puncure the sidewall! Also, if i was given a choice of only carrying one tube, it would be a front. You can ride slowly with a flat rear, but would be absolutely doomed with a flat front!
Just IMHO Do a search, i've had lots to say already on flat tires.


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