Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB

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-   -   Peace of mind or pain in rear? (http://www.horizonsunlimited.com/hubb/equipping-bike-whats-best-gear/peace-of-mind-pain-rear-35933)

Warthog 15 Jun 2008 09:59

Peace of mind or pain in rear?
 
1 Attachment(s)
Has anyone ever tried these?

Although not such an issue day-to-day, I thought these might be a real boon on a big overland trip; eliminating the worries of getting a flat in the back end of nowhere.

I was primarily thinking fitting these to my Ural outfit as it is heavy and runs tubed tyres. The main disadvantages I can think of is the initial price, and possibly making it harder to change worn tyres (?).

1. So have these been used?

2. Are they recommended?

3. If not, why not?

4. Have I over looked anything?

Thanks.

quastdog 15 Jun 2008 11:22

Check the specs carefully. A lot of these types of things reduce safe operating speeds, and they also don't last long.

These thigns aren't designed by real riders to go long distances; more like the lunatic fringe who want to design a better mouse trap - something like these have probably been tried countless times in the history of motorcycling - and there's a reason why we are still using an inner tube full of air - best for all conditions/handling/grip and other characteristics and requirements of the motorbike.

You are better off just learning to fix flats - and carry appropriate repair items and extra tubes - IMO. Tubes, rubber cement, patches, and free air can be found everywhere.

Big Yellow Tractor 16 Jun 2008 08:30

Quote:

Originally Posted by quastdog (Post 194448)
Check the specs carefully. A lot of these types of things reduce safe operating speeds, and they also don't last long.

These thigns aren't designed by real riders to go long distances; more like the lunatic fringe who want to design a better mouse trap - something like these have probably been tried countless times in the history of motorcycling - and there's a reason why we are still using an inner tube full of air - best for all conditions/handling/grip and other characteristics and requirements of the motorbike.

You are better off just learning to fix flats - and carry appropriate repair items and extra tubes - IMO. Tubes, rubber cement, patches, and free air can be found everywhere.

I use mouses for trail riding and racing as do (I think I'm right with this) most of the Dakar bikes. They allow you to have a very soft tyre for grip without having to worry about hitting rocks. I just like the piece of mind. When trail riding, I carry a tube and levers just in case one of them gives up.

I wouldn't use them for a long tour, they just wouldn't last. I wouldn't expect to be riding such speeds over rocks and hey, if I have to stop for half an hour to replace a tube so be it. Maybe get a brew on while I'm at it.

Good points
No punctures, whatever you run in to.

Bad Points
Expensive
Don't last forever

quastdog 16 Jun 2008 14:04

Quote:

Originally Posted by Big Yellow Tractor (Post 194561)
I wouldn't use them for a long tour, they just wouldn't last.

My point exactly Tractor.

they might be fine for some limited application - but for long distance fully loaded transcontinental traveling???

Stephano 16 Jun 2008 19:57

Bib-Mousse
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Warthog (Post 194444)
Has anyone ever tried these?

These are called Bib-Mousse. I have them on my CRF. If you search for 'bib mousse' on this BB you'll find several threads.

The main answer to your question can be found here.
Stephan

Warthog 16 Jun 2008 21:36

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stephano (Post 194647)
These are called Bib-Mousse. I have them on my CRF. If you search for 'bib mousse' on this BB you'll find several threads.

The main answer to your question can be found here.
Stephan

The equivalent air pressure says it all really!!

Best just live with puncture repairs then!

Big Yellow Tractor 16 Jun 2008 21:48

The "usefull life" they quote is very low. I get much longer than that out of mine. I do give them a good clean and relube when I change tyres though. I think the rear on my race wheels probably feels like about 8psi now so has probably had it.........nearly

Mine are Metzler a fair bit cheaper than Michelin but very nicely made.

Frank Warner 17 Jun 2008 03:31

Bib mouse bad - for heavy bike.
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Warthog (Post 194444)
I was primarily thinking fitting these to my Ural outfit as it is heavy and runs tubed tyres.

Bib mouses are suited to light weight racing bikes where fixing a flat means loosing a race.

You cannot change ths tyre pressure to suit the load you are carring.

So the Answer is NO.

Please consider puting the item in the subject .. to find out what you are talking about I needed to read right to the end .. even then I had to look at some link thing at the very end... put it in the title eg

Bib mouse -good or bad?

Warthog 17 Jun 2008 09:28

Quote:

Originally Posted by Frank Warner (Post 194694)
Please consider puting the item in the subject .. to find out what you are talking about I needed to read right to the end .. even then I had to look at some link thing at the very end... put it in the title eg

Bib mouse -good or bad?

Sorry if the subject was not clear, but I thought every thing relevant was in my very first post.

As for the marketed name: I did not know it, hence why I attached a picture instead.

As to whether or not to use them, the PSI equivalent, alone, that Stephano informed me about makes this a prohibitive move on a Ural.

I will probably invest in some tougher inners, and some Ultra-seal/Slime puncture prevention fluid.

henryuk 17 Jun 2008 11:25

A lot of the slime type products can be a problem if you then want to let the air out (to change tyre/increase footprint etc).

I highly rate the conti heavy duty inners. Whatever you get try and get natural rather than synthetic rubber, it generates less heat and can stretch a bit more making it more resilient.

I don't know if it is relevant but I have always used cheap duck tape instead of 'proper' rim tape on spoked wheels and have never had a puncture....


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