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Equipping the Bike - what's the best gear? Anything to do with the bikes equipment, saddlebags, etc. Questions on repairs and maintenance of the bike itself belong in the Brand Specific Tech Forums.
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Giant Loop Motorcycle Saddlebags & Motorcycle Tank Bags: Panniers, Soft Luggage for Adventure & Sport Touring

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  #16  
Old 27 May 2009
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Originally Posted by edteamslr View Post
You're right - big tanks are the way forward but:
1) they're more expensive.
2) usually bulkier and heavier than standard
3) often require extra taps/management of the quantity of fuel in each side.
4) not realistic to take off if you need to lift a heavy bike up on your own.
5) spend most of the trip only half full because you just don't usually need that much range!
1) Yes but if you divide the price on 100kkms or more…
2) Not necessary heavier (my 43 liter tank is lighter then my 33 liter) and it carries the fuel lower then the original tank.
3) Is that a bad thing? You can double up with fuel filters, easier to fill your cooker etc.
4) If that’s a problem a bit of practice would help. I’m not athletic but I have no problems to lift up my bike with luggage and 43 liters of petrol.
5) I always fill my tank 100% but on average it’s half full :-)
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  #17  
Old 27 May 2009
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Originally Posted by electric_monk View Post
In europe it is illegal to transport fuel in anything other than an Approved Fuel container. These are, generally, the steel jerry can or a plastic can of either 5 or 10 lts.
Having a friend in the Insurance industry, I discovered that some insurance companies specifically state that petrol Must Not be carried in the boot of the car. You can just imagine what they would say if they discovered you were carrying petrol in a plastic bag on a bike...

My own personal view is that you would need to be nuts to consider such an option as a plan from the start....I would really have to be in a tight jam to consider...

Where in Europe would you need a jerry can anyways?
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  #18  
Old 27 May 2009
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1) 99% of bikes don't reach 100kkm. Divide by what? It's still more expensive
2) If you already had 33ltr you're in the wrong thread. I was thinking about bikes with half that!
3) I ride bikes not 747s. If I wanted to pump fuel around my bike I'd be in a different hobby
4) Lifting it up off the road in front of your house doesn't count
5) So you're always carrying twice as much fuel as you actually need?

Look, I'm only joking but I wanted to continue this thread to find out what sort of options are out there. I did the big bike/big tank thing and want to see if I could have more fun on lightweight thumper somewhere between here and siberia using something like this. I'll stop now..
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  #19  
Old 27 May 2009
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Originally Posted by edteamslr View Post
Oh, I've just had an email from the Bennetts representative in the Congo.
He says I can put my fuel in whatever I like

(ignore the last comment)

SMARTARSE....
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  #20  
Old 27 May 2009
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Originally Posted by edteamslr View Post
I did the big bike/big tank thing and want to see if I could have more fun on lightweight thumper somewhere between here and siberia using something like this. I'll stop now..
I have seen a DR350 with a similar tank (43L). The same statements are valid, except that the bike will probably not last 100kkm but he can move the tank to his next bike.
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  #21  
Old 27 May 2009
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Plastic jerry cans are what the locals use in these far flung places...and there's a reason. And if it makes you feel better...they're well tested by locals and by me.
I used 4 cans between Morocco and the US. 2 of them made it all the way...they other two were stolen. I didn't exactly lose sleep over that.

Pics...

dscn8559.jpg

new_crashbars.jpg

Plus, I'd rather give my $$s to a local bloke in Mauritania for a jerry can...than $150 for a bladder....that if it breaks, I'd still end up paying the local guy...

We don't need to prep too much before a trip...or else you'll worry about how much stuff costs when it breaks...try the local methods...its part of the adventure.
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  #22  
Old 27 May 2009
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Security of kit, ie. opportunistic stealing, is always a concern. I think you could help yourself by putting the bladder in a packsafe for example. In any case, my soft panniers will be a magnet for opportunists anyway.

We didn't lose a single item to stealing between UK and Namibia, when my tent was rifled and a camera/phone stolen. We were careful all the time until then when we let our guard down (but not paranoid either).
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  #23  
Old 27 May 2009
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I guess it depends what you are looking for….

When you need to carry extra petrol you often need to carry extra water.
Lets say you will need 15 liters extra petrol and the same amount of water. Then you need to carry 30 liters in bottles/canisters/bladders and that’s not nice… This usually happens on places with no roads or bad roads.


This bike is loaded with 15 liters extra fuel and 15 liters of water, look how vulnerable the canister looks:


I have “lost” 5 liters when some thorns punctured a canister and it was not nice. Canisters and bottles all over the bike are not safe so I like to carry all the petrol in my tank.

If it’s only a matter of a few liters it might be okay.
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  #24  
Old 27 May 2009
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Originally Posted by AliBaba View Post
<SNIP>
When you need to carry extra petrol you often need to carry extra water.
Lets say you will need 15 liters extra petrol and the same amount of water. Then you need to carry 30 liters in bottles/canisters/bladders and that’s not nice… This usually happens on places with no roads or bad roads.

<SNIP>

I have “lost” 5 liters when some thorns punctured a canister and it was not nice. Canisters and bottles all over the bike are not safe so I like to carry all the petrol in my tank.

If it’s only a matter of a few liters it might be okay.
Yes...I agree...about the water part...but that's something as a rider you have to be aware of...and make your calculations on the situation that lies ahead.
Relative to carrying extra fuel, I disagree on the big tank being a necessity. If you calculate the kilometres/miles you'll get from your jerry cans, then you'll know exactly when to stop, and fill your tank, with fuel from your jerry cans.
If you choose to refuel when your main tank runs dry instead of when your main tank has enough space to empty your full jerry cans, then you're choosing to increase your risk instead of minimize it.
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  #25  
Old 27 May 2009
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Originally Posted by edteamslr View Post
Oh, I've just had an email from the Bennetts representative in the Congo.
He says I can put my fuel in whatever I like

(ignore the last comment)
I'll bet I can get Bennetts in the UK to agree to that too. There again, they think Morocco is in the EU, a leading link fork is some sort of electrical device and a Moto Guzzi is a Chinese grey import . (All true conversations I've had with their call centre. Devitt DA think a Ural has a built in intercom too????).

Big tanks are seriously overpriced. I added 8 litres for an extra 120 miles to my old F650 (carbed) for almost £400. That's £3 per mile over the bikes standard range. Norman Hyde want £800 for 2 gallons extra/90 miles/£8.80 per mile for the Bonneville. My auxilliary tank cost £70 for 10 litres and 100 miles on the Bonneville, or 70p per mile. A 10 litre jerry can would be down at 15p per mile with the hassle of having to stop and empty it into the bike.

The Acerbis tank broke it's fuel tap after a year (£30). The Aux tank is all welded, but I supose the in-line tap could go (£14). The jerry can is disposable, but they tend to last forever. The bladders replace the jerry cans very well, but take up a lot less space when empty.

To me they key is how often you use the range. I can easily go 200 miles without stopping, so a 120 mile tank is useless in Wales on a Sunday. I have come close to running out a 430 mile range F650 and a 420 mile range Bonneville two or three times. I can justify £150 worth of Aux/jerry can/bladders, but £400 of plastic, never again.

Andy
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  #26  
Old 27 May 2009
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Originally Posted by MotoEdde View Post
Relative to carrying extra fuel, I disagree on the big tank being a necessity.
It's not a necessity, it just makes things easier and maybe safer.
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  #27  
Old 7 Jun 2009
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Originally Posted by edteamslr View Post
Please can you let us know what he says?

Whether there is a discount for multiple orders and the possibility to save on shipping costs?
I did not get a response last time.
I filled 2 forms of his online site today and hope he will answer.
If not phoning may be next option.
What is the time difference btw UK and OZ Gold coast????? (where ever that coast is!) ...
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  #28  
Old 7 Jun 2009
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Originally Posted by maria41 View Post
What is the time difference btw UK and OZ Gold coast????? (where ever that coast is!) ...
Here you go, Maria. GMT +10 hours
Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia

BTW, I wrote to Paul at LC around this time last year looking for backup for my bike for crossing Saudi. He wrote back and answered my questions several times and even offered me a 'second-hand' bladder at a reduced cost.

It was still a bit pricey though and I ended up taking a 5-litre plastic fuel can (which didn't leave my bike until removed by a nice man on the channel ferry on grounds of safety).

Stephan
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  #29  
Old 8 Jun 2009
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These look pretty good...

ATV Fuel Pack | Fuel Packs | ATV Fuel | Gas Container | Gas Can | Fuel Storage | Kolpin | Gas Cans | Jerry Cans
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  #30  
Old 8 Jun 2009
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Just be a bit cautious about flexy tanks and petrol. The military can get away with them, but for civilian use (in Australia and elsewhere) the tank has to comply with a whole series of tests and have a UN roundall with an approval number stamped onto the tank. I've looked for the Queensland approval number and cant find it, and the product is not listed as an approved tank for the last dangerous goods code, in the issue that I have 2005 (photos are 2003 so would have assumed that approval would have been granted). Diesel is not a dangerous good so it can be stored in these flexy tanks without legal problems.

Be wary - no business address, no Australian Business Number (two strikes against the business laws in Oz) and only a mobile phone number on the website that I could find.
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