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  #1  
Old 22 Aug 2012
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Comparison: Adv Spec Magadan; Enduristan Monsoon, Kriega Overlander, GL Siskiyou

Hi all, the range of overland-ready soft baggage has got better than ever lately and in the last few months I’ve used Enduristan Monsoon throwovers in Morocco, been getting into my new Adventure Spec Magadans and had a mate drop by the other day with his new Kriega Overlander set up and in March 2013 inspcted the new Giant Loop Siskiyou panniers.

Over the years I’ve also used Touratech Zega Flex, Andy Strapz (melted before I got a pic), as well as Oxford Soverign (also melted) and army surplus/canvas (burned) when there was nothing better, plus alloy boxes, sawn off jerries and all the rest.

The table below sums up the stats of the first five mentioned (above links go to detailed reviews/impressions + pics) as those are the ones I have direct and recent experience with. Other soft baggage is available and may suit your needs better ;-)

Some manage without, but I reckon if you're carrying a big load in throwovers on a trans-continental ride in what I call the AMZ, some kind of rack is essential to securely locate the bags away from hot pipes, wheels and chains.

Hope some of you find the comparison useful.

Chris S
Attached Thumbnails
Comparison: Adv Spec Magadan; Enduristan Monsoon, Kriega Overlander, GL Siskiyou-fivepans.jpg  

Comparison: Adv Spec Magadan; Enduristan Monsoon, Kriega Overlander, GL Siskiyou-softcomp.jpg  


Last edited by Chris Scott; 25 May 2013 at 01:27. Reason: update March 2013
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  #2  
Old 22 Aug 2012
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Kriega are listing the Overlander-60 setup at £489 on their website, as are ADV-spec. As far as I can tell you get both bags and platforms for that price.
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  #3  
Old 22 Aug 2012
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You're right Dash.
The price given in the table was as I saw them, with three bags + the Rotopax mount and cans based on Kriega online prices.
I've clarified the table. Thanks

C
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  #4  
Old 22 Aug 2012
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No problem. Didn't quite add up with what I thought I'd read for the Kriega, so I went and checked - the Rotopax stuff isn't cheap is it?

Interesting comparison.
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  #5  
Old 22 Aug 2012
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I used the Kriega us 30 and the US 10 for 5 weeks in total find them very good and very well waterproof (9 days of rain).
Maybe you could put them on your list.
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  #6  
Old 23 Aug 2012
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A downside to the Kriega system which occurred to me today is size. I know in theory they can form one of the larger capacity luggage options but the smaller Suze of each individual bag must surely be restrictive forcing you to put longer items, tent/sleeping mat/tools etc in a bag across the luggage rack/pillion which then lifts the CofG up and back and away from Chris's optimal low and forward position. The perk to a single bigger bag each side is surely the fact that they have long diagonals for items which won't fold short.

I'm personally still not convinced that any of the soft luggage has yet got close to perfect, in some cases they seem over constructed like the Magadans with their duplication of waterproof roll-top bags one inside the other, I'm still pondering the idea of an outer, semi-rigid compression "bag", nut waterproof but abrasion resistant with simple roll-top waterproof bags inside.
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  #7  
Old 23 Aug 2012
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Four small bags is not what I would choose either, for the reasons Alex mentions. I suggested a 30+ version when I saw the Overlanders at a bike show earlier in the year. The US30 mentioned above might be made to fit on the Kriega platform, but so would any bag (or box) if you want their q/d rack mounting.

My preference is for side bags with outer pockets as big as possible without being too wide, and the Magadans tick that box (as do the currently unavailable Steel Ponys on which Mags are based, afaict). That way you can have next to nothing on the back of the bike.
I don't think the Mags' doubled outer fabric claims to be waterproof, although the inner layer does appear PU-coated. But if it is, so much the better. The outer deals with abrasion (and supposedly slashing), the removable taped PVC inner is waterproof, or you can use your own dry bags to compartmentalise inside.
As other reviewers have mentioned, all the Mags are missing are a few D-rings similar to those found on these South African ATG bags to extend location options. I'm also converting the over-seat velcro straps to buckles.

I know an alloy box maker has been talking about 'semi-rigid' bags for years, but discussing it with him I'm still not quite sure what he means.

Ch
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  #8  
Old 23 Aug 2012
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I'm planning on putting together a homebrew/cheaper version of the Kriega system over the winter, using the US-XX packs (because I've already got an assortment of them, I can't see that they are any less robust than the Overlander packs, and it allows a mix of sizes from 5-30l rather than just the 15l Overlander ones) and allowing mounting of a couple of the Ocean Slim fuel/water cans (because I can't bring myself to pay what the Rotopax kit costs for a very occasional requirement).

The nice thing about the US-XX packs is that they all strap together, so if you had a rack to take a US-30, you could probably add another 30l of capacity in smaller packs on the occasions you needed it, without needing a bigger rack.

I'm not convinced that the quick-release/clip straps that come with the US-XX packs are up to the job of being mounted on the side of a dirt bike. They're designed as tailpacks for road bikes, and I have experienced them slowly loosening when used as a tailpack on bumpy trails. Mounting them on the side of the bike is likely to lead to even worse loading. Will be testing this and then coming up with a workaround if necessary.

Will try and dig up this thread when I get round to making my rack.
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  #9  
Old 23 Aug 2012
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Chris,

WRT your comment:

'some kind of rack is essential to securely locate the bags away from hot pipes, wheels and chains.'

I have personally used the Giant Loop baggage systems for numerous trips short and long as have many others. They behave excellently without racks and seem pretty much crash indestructible (I seem to spend more time than most testing this aspect of luggage!).

Well worth a look for any bike, but particularly for the smaller bikes or those who aren't keen or can't find racks to fit.

Dave
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  #10  
Old 23 Aug 2012
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Dash, have a look at this post on ABR - it may give you some ideas.
As for fuel and water, I prefer bags. I see Zen now do this chunky 7 litre fuel bag from Liquid Containment in Ozzie (70 quid). That's where I got mine a couple years ago (it since got pinched).

Quote:
... Mounting them on the side of the bike is likely to lead to even worse loading
It's the old problem with what I call 'hanging racks' which are prevalent these days. Your answer could be the long-forgotten platform rack. That's the way I'm going.

Quote:
... to prevent forward or rear movement
Yes, that's the only real flaw I can cite with my Magadans, but as Bert says the pocket straps can be sort of used for that. Just spent the morning sewing on D-rings in the bottom corners (can see the value of thimbles now). I've also fitted regular buckles to the velcro straps over the back; easier for small adjustments IMO, but velcro remains a back up.

I've yet to see a Giant Loop system in the flesh - it's a cunning 'fits all' concept but having scrutinised them online I've yet to be convinced by the concept for actual long-term overland travel (as opposed to rec biking) when compared to the zip-free, low mass CoG, out-the-box waterproof (as Bert describes), easy lift-out & chunky inners + the external pockets of the Magadans [deep breath...] giving you the option to fit what you like on the back (if anything): Peli box, roll bag, alloy cube.
GLs have the appearance of being awkward to load well and access easily, but I'm sure it's a knack one can acquire. Among other things I'd consider a redesign to replace the vulnerable zip closure with a roll top.

It looks to me like the 50-L Great Basin goes back to putting the mass of the volume (if not necessarily actual weight) above the seat line instead of down low and forward, and mention on the US site of: 'Includes seam sealing kit to maximize water resistance' (as I've received with some US-made tents) is a dead give away... Plus from their images, the so-called GL Dry Bag looks like an afterthought and a backward step in centralising weight.
But I admit that when full, they look like they'll sit across the back seat like a dead deer, attach and remove very quickly and fit any bike with pillion pegs. No rack so no unnecessary extra width, expense or weight.

I am prepared to eat all these words if I ever get to use GBs long term and like them, but I never considered them for my current bike.

Ch

Last edited by Chris Scott; 23 Aug 2012 at 23:33.
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  #11  
Old 24 Aug 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Scott View Post
It's the old problem with what I call 'hanging racks' which are prevalent these days. Your answer could be the long-forgotten platform rack. That's the way I'm going.
The thought had occurred to me, although there's a risk of negating one of the reasons for having soft bags in the first place - not having anything solid behind your legs.
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  #12  
Old 29 Aug 2012
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Quote:
... not having anything solid behind your legs
Not if you [can] use a pipe rack...

Ch
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  #13  
Old 30 Aug 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Scott View Post


I've yet to see a Giant Loop system in the flesh - it's a cunning 'fits all' concept but having scrutinised them online I've yet to be convinced by the concept for actual long-term overland travel (as opposed to rec biking) when compared to the zip-free, low mass CoG, out-the-box waterproof (as Bert describes), easy lift-out & chunky inners + the external pockets of the Magadans [deep breath...] giving you the option to fit what you like on the back (if anything): Peli box, roll bag, alloy cube.
GLs have the appearance of being awkward to load well and access easily, but I'm sure it's a knack one can acquire. Among other things I'd consider a redesign to replace the vulnerable zip closure with a roll top.

It looks to me like the 50-L Great Basin goes back to putting the mass of the volume (if not necessarily actual weight) above the seat line instead of down low and forward, and mention on the US site of: 'Includes seam sealing kit to maximize water resistance' (as I've received with some US-made tents) is a dead give away... Plus from their images, the so-called GL Dry Bag looks like an afterthought and a backward step in centralising weight.
But I admit that when full, they look like they'll sit across the back seat like a dead deer, attach and remove very quickly and fit any bike with pillion pegs. No rack so no unnecessary extra width, expense or weight.

I am prepared to eat all these words if I ever get to use GBs long term and like them, but I never considered them for my current bike.

Ch
I've used a GL Great Basin this summer on my trip to Central Asia, Russia and Mongolia. It sits well on the back seat of my Transalp and behaves very well in terms of balance and weight distribution. I put my sleep bag/thermarest/clothes at the top and heavier stuff like tools/spares/oil down the sides. It is really strong and the long zipper is also very sturdy. Don't have a rack either.

Next year I'm returning to Mong to continue my trip towards Siberia. Today, I'm writing a list of stuff I need to buy in the UK and bring next year: Top of this list is more lightweight drybags. Why? The GL, despite having the seams sealed, leaks like fcuk! I've had to cross quite a few rivers on the trip and had my fair share of rain/ hail/ snow in the mountains. Siberia won't be any dryer. The dry bags will keep the contents of my wetbag GL dry.

Another "disadvantage" of the GL is that you can't "sit" on it like you could traditional soft bags like those in the thread title. I've found it nice to be able to spread the weight of my butt over a wider area than just the narrow seat found on most smaller enduro bikes.

Sorry, I didn't want to sabotage this thread as GL isn't up for discussion here. Also I've met Dave Wachs and he and his wife are super people. GL does however need to make their bags waterproof.
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  #14  
Old 30 Aug 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Scott View Post
Not if you [can] use a pipe rack...

Ch
Cunning, if you have the right bike.
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  #15  
Old 30 Aug 2012
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Smile

Save weight by using a pair of Thule 521 straps vertically and horizontally. (300kgs breaking strain so slight ! overkill but they are built to last and do not shred like so many cheap nylon ones I have used in the past. I tried Rok straps but they were not as effective)
Walter had a stroke of genius when designing the Magadan bags allowing a strap to go horizontally around it. You can thread through the outer pockets so that the strap just hugs the bag and does interfere with pocket access.
A clever feature that seems to have eluded most owners I've met with those bags so far!
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