Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > Equipment, Travel > Camping Equipment and all Clothing

Camping Equipment and all Clothing Tents, sleeping bags, stoves etc. Riding clothing, boots, helmets, what to wear when not riding, etc.
Contact Overland Solutions for all your custom modifications and setup for overland travel.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #16  
Old 18 Dec 2009
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Worthington Mn USA
Posts: 174
Svea 123

If I am just taking my Svea along for cooking I use just unleaded fuel and we also use gasahol in my state. Both work fine. If I am taking my lanturn along for light at night then I usuall take coleman fuel and use that. When I am done using it I just turn it off and it goes out and it will hold pressure for several months. I have never talked to anyone that had one that did not love it. If it was not this late I would go find it and do the water boil test as I know will keep up with the best of them. It burns with a blue flame and roars like a jet engine. It generates it own pressure and I have used it to make coffee in the morning for 8 or 9 guys. It keeps up pretty good even making that much. Just a happy user. I really like something that works forever and does what it is supposed to.
__________________
Larry Davis
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 18 Dec 2009
Redboots's Avatar
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: On the border - NE FR
Posts: 843
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldbmw View Post
White gas ( coleman fuel) is more expensive a liter than a 470 cartridge and not easy to find locally. Will it work ok on unleaded petrol? Secondly,, when you finish using it, how do you stop it from leaking the remaining fuel.. cant find a sensible answer.
I have had mine since 1974 and have always used whatever fuel us in my tank, so in the early days, it was leaded
Once it's cooled, I release any remaining pressure using the filler cap, wind the needle up and put the whole lot in a plastic bag. Never had a fuel leak.

I'm sure you could find a "tupperware" type box that is a snug fit for it if you were concerned about it.

John
__________________
Nostradamus Ate My Hamster
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 18 Dec 2009
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,520
thanks for the information... always better to talk to an owner or two.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 18 Dec 2009
Gold Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: UK
Posts: 367
All these SVEA fans saying how good a roaring flame it produces, can I ask how controllable it is for lower temps? Simmering etc? Some stoves do b####y hot very well but can't simmer a stew for an hour
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 18 Dec 2009
mj's Avatar
mj mj is offline
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Munich, Germany
Posts: 310
The Svea does indeed look very interesting. What's the noise emission? I found some fuel stoves that look great but sound like a jet engine.
__________________
"Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in one pretty and well preserved piece, but to skid across the line broadside, thoroughly used up, worn out, leaking oil, shouting GERONIMO!"
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 18 Dec 2009
Redboots's Avatar
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: On the border - NE FR
Posts: 843
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJungowski View Post
What's the noise emission? I found some fuel stoves that look great but sound like a jet engine.
747 but great for waking up other campers with the early coffee brew.

John
__________________
Nostradamus Ate My Hamster
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 18 Dec 2009
mj's Avatar
mj mj is offline
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Munich, Germany
Posts: 310
Quick update: we purchased a stove today. We took a look at the Primus FuelEx, too, but in the end decided to go with an MSR Whisperlite. It was the smallest and lightest of all stoves available (remember, we had a 190€ coupon for that store so our choice was a bit limited) and its 120€ price tag also seemed very convincing. I read a few good and a few bad things about it, and it seemed to be the lesser evil.

In addition I'll build a basic and compact hobo stove myself and give it a try on our next trip. The ones I found on- and offline seemed way too expensive - four steel plates and a few hinges should NOT cost 70 bucks.
__________________
"Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in one pretty and well preserved piece, but to skid across the line broadside, thoroughly used up, worn out, leaking oil, shouting GERONIMO!"
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 18 Dec 2009
Contributing Vendor
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Tallinn, Estonia
Posts: 973
Quote:
Originally Posted by MJungowski View Post
in the end decided to go with an MSR Whisperlite.
Had one before the omnifuel.

You are limited to liquid fuels, but is still a nice, dependable stove: We liked it and it served us well across S. America
__________________
Adventure: it's an experience, not a style!
(so ride what you like, but ride it somewhere new!)
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 18 Dec 2009
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Worthington Mn USA
Posts: 174
Svea stove

I had compared it to a noise of a jet engine but even though it sounds like that kind of noise it is not all that loud. It does turn down to a simer if you are cooking something that you want to simmer for several hours. This stove does come with caution. Do not and I repeat do not attempt its use inside like a tent. Also you should practice with it so you know how to light it and put it out. You should also practice at home with it in taking it apart and putting it back together so you are very familiar with its use. Like any fine tool you have to use it right. You first light it by poring gas on the outside of it. That in itself needs to be done with caution and then you never attempt to light it with a open can of fuel near. I have seen people put to much on which is not a big problem if you do not get up and kick over the open can of fuel that you left right by your foot. I said it is simple to use but unfortunatly it is not idiot proof. Enough said.............
__________________
Larry Davis
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 18 Dec 2009
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: calgary canada
Posts: 127
I found this thread very interesting! I bought a Svea 123 in 1969 and have used it as cold as minus 30, it is a little hard to pressurize at that temp so if you have a camp fire going you just set the stove on the edge of the coals to preheat the unit and then it fires right up!! It is the model with the pin jet cleaner.
I look at others when I am in the gear stores and can't see why I would want to retire the 123!!
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 19 Dec 2009
mj's Avatar
mj mj is offline
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Munich, Germany
Posts: 310
Quote:
Originally Posted by Warthog View Post
You are limited to liquid fuels, but is still a nice, dependable stove: We liked it and it served us well across S. America
We thought about that, long and hard. And in the end we figured that it's fine, since we're not going to carry around a gas cartridge and a bottle of fuel. We ride two-up with full camping gear, so space is very limited. And in case we ever decide that a gas stove would be the smarter choice, like for a short two- or three-day trip, we still have our old Camping Gaz stove.
__________________
"Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in one pretty and well preserved piece, but to skid across the line broadside, thoroughly used up, worn out, leaking oil, shouting GERONIMO!"
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 21 Dec 2009
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Aberdeen, Scotland
Posts: 9
On the bike, I take a Coleman 533 because I don't want to carry an extra bottle of fuel when I have a tank full. It's a bit fierce & needs careful shielding from the wind if you want to simmer. But generally a very good stove.Note: Although they're not really designed to run on leaded petrol, they will, but take a spare generator.

Backpacking - Trangia. Very controllable. Almost windproof. Also if you spill Meths (denatured alcohol) your kit won't stink for all eternity.

Hexamine stove - ideal for emergency kits but you can't really 'cook' on it, just heat things up.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 31 Mar 2011
Registered Users
New on the HUBB
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 1
Primus multi fuel never again.


Primus multi fuel never again.

I initially was very excited about the Primus multi fuel. As it is lightweight and burns most oil based fuels. However shortly after I bought the stove it started leaking at the coupling. So I contacted Primus and they informed that this was common problem with the older pumps and they posted me anew repalcement one. The new pump started leaking within a few hours of use. I personally never want to use one of these high tech looking multi fuel stoves again. They are prone to leaking and have many flimsy parts that cause problems when you least expect it. I would stick with an old school sturdy stove like the SVEA123, a gas cooker or for small trips maybe even haximine tablets or just make a wood fire. I found out that with stoves and outdoor cooking in general simpler is better.
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 31 Mar 2011
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,520
This is an old thread, since its start I bought a primus omnifuel. I dislike it intensely and now leave it ar home and prefer my £10 Gaz stove. It wont simmer, and takes too long to setup and disassemble plus t he preheat time. much quicker and cleaner with the gaz. of course if I was to spend months in deepest wild places my opinion might change. On my Trip to poland via Italy it was such a nuisance to deploy I reverted to only cold drinks instead of my usual brew ups aside the the road.

If anyone wants to buy the omni fuel used about a dozen times only, drop me a line. I shall be sticking to Gaz for the foreseeable future.
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 2 Apr 2011
Super Moderator
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,931
OldBMW- if it won't simmer, it needs servicing - as something isn't right- mine does beautifully-
If it's this one you have, (same as mine) you simply change the jet for the gas-
Jet number 45 is for gas, 37 gasoline/whitegas and 28 for diesel/kerosene.
It is a very good stove and should you run out of gas but have your bike, you won't be stuck for a brew-up
Attached Images
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
used MSR stove ozhanu Camping Equipment and all Clothing 13 24 Sep 2009 18:18
Gas stove Richard K 4WD Overland TRAVEL 2 16 Jun 2009 14:22
stove spares Tenere99 Northern Asia 4 8 Jun 2009 04:50
gas stove containers kiwiron Camping Equipment and all Clothing 0 4 Oct 2007 08:52
Primus Omnifuel - diesel stove?! danielsprague Camping Equipment and all Clothing 10 1 Mar 2007 13:10

 
 
 

NEW! HU 2015 Motorcycle Adventure Travel Calendar is now available! Get your copy now for some terrific travel inspiration!

HUGE, 11.5 x 16.5 inches, beautifully printed in Germany on top quality stock! Photos are the winning images from over 600 entries in the 9th Annual HU Photo Contest!

Horizons Unlimited 2015 Motorcycle Adventure Travel Calendar.

"The calendar is magnificent!"

"I just wanted to say how much I'm loving the new, larger calendar!"

We share the profit with the winning photographers. YOU could be in the HU Calendar too - enter here!

Next HU Eventscalendar

See all events

 

Latvia to Australia, an inspirational 5 month journey full of unexpected adventures!


Renedian Adventures

Renedian Adventures

What others say about HU...

"I just wanted to say thanks for doing this and sharing so much with the rest of us." Dave, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the DVD series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring! The new look of the website is very impressive, updated and catchy. Thank you so very much!" Jennifer, Canada

"...Great site. Keep up the good work." Murray and Carmen, Australia

"We just finished a 7 month 22,000+ mile scouting trip from Alaska to the bottom of Chile and I can't tell you how many times we referred to your site for help. From how to adjust your valves, to where to stay in the back country of Peru. Horizons Unlimited was a key player in our success. Motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world are in debt to your services." Alaska Riders

contest pic

10th Annual HU Travellers Photo Contest is on now! This is an opportunity for YOU to show us your best photos and win prizes!

NEW! HU 2014 Adventure Travel T-shirts! are now available in several colors! Be the first kid on your block to have them! New lower prices on synths!

HU 2014 T-shirts now in!

Check out the new Gildan Performance cotton-feel t-shirt - 100% poly, feels like soft cotton!


What turns you on to motorcycle travel?


Global Rescue, WORLDwide evacuation services for EVERYONE

Global Rescue is the premier provider of medical, security and evacuation services worldwide and is the only company that will come to you, wherever you are, and evacuate you to your home hospital of choice. Additionally, Global Rescue places no restrictions on country of citizenship - all nationalities are eligible to sign-up!


New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80 G/S motorcycle.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events (22 this year!); we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, the HUBB or to receive the e-zine. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.


Books & DVDs

amazon

All the best travel books and videos listed and often reviewed on HU's famous Books page. Check it out and get great travel books from all over the world.


Motorcycle Express for shipping and insurance!

Motorcycle Express

MC Air Shipping, (uncrated) USA / Canada / Europe and other areas. Be sure to say "Horizons Unlimited" to get your $25 discount on Shipping!
Insurance - see: For foreigners traveling in US and Canada and for Americans and Canadians traveling in other countries, then mail it to MC Express and get your HU $15 discount!




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:51.