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  #1  
Old 1 Aug 2009
Transmaniacon MC's Avatar
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Information on Tentipi tepee tents

I am currently doing research with thoughts into the purchase of a Tentipi tepee tent from Sweden. I live in Florida, USA were Tentipi tents are not sold anywhere so I have to order it from Sweden. I want to make sure it is as great a tent as the Tentipi manufacturer says it is. I have never seen one of the Tentipi tents up close in person, only on you-tube videos and pictures. So I have no real idea about how they look or feel inside of them or how things work. If you have any pictures of your Tentipi please post them so I may get a understanding about the tents. Or maybe you have another tent you use that you want to suggest I look at. I am thinking of the Safir model just not really sure about CP canvas or Light fabric or what size either the 5 or 7 person, many people say get the 7 as it is bigger with not much more weight and cost when buying. I was thinking of the Safir 5 Light but many say get the CP canvas one as it is more heavy duty and breaths better but it also weights much more than the Light. I plan to buy the floor but not the inner tent because of the extra weight. Weight and packed carrying size needs to be light and small sized for traveling packed up. I am looking for anyone who has a Tentipi or has use one before for information about them being used for mobile travel camping. I am planning a very long distance motorcycle adventure trip traveling for many months on the road from the sandy desert to arctic tundra and back. So I have a few questions about the Tentipi? Are they a excellent made high quality tent? Which is better CP canvas or Light fabric? Is canvas worth the extra weight? How do they pack down as far as size and weight to carry? Are they big and heavy to carry when packed up to travel, how is the weight? I understand they are tall and roomy but does the pole in middle cause problems? Are they dark inside or does light pass through during daylight? Do you use a stove inside your tent for warmth? Can a gas lantern be used to warm the tent enough to take the chill off? Do they really vent air the way they say they do with the inside adjustable vented tops? Are they good in really hard rain and very high winds, any problems with leaks, problems packing the tent up wet, problems with the floors, or any problems you may have had with your Tentipi tent? Tell me to what you like and love about the Tentipi tent for camping. It seems like a very high quality strong well make tent from excellent materials manufactured and sewn with extremely high standards of craftsmanship. Which is at least what I am hoping for what with the money cost of a Tentipi tent. I know they are very expensive so you do not have to tell me that. I really do not mind paying for a beautiful well made high quality Tentipi tipi tent if it's the kind of tent I can get years of good rough hard regular use out of it. Plus at $50 to $150 or more for one nights stay at a motel I figure it will pay for itself in no time if I can primitive camp and stay in it even in the very worst foul bad weather. I am looking for a strong sheltering tent that I can really get use to living in as I travel down the road as if it is my home. Where I would rather stay in my tent than get a motel or not mind holding up in it for a day in really bad weather when it's best not to ride my motorcycle or to just stay in it a few days at the same place without being cramped. No more having to crawl inside of a tent then only to be able to lay down in it. I want a real live-in tent that I can stand up in to move around spreading out my gear as I cook a meal feeling safe and protected from any outside elements that has the spirit and character of a nomad traveling home. Most of early primitive man's portable mobile shelters were forms of tepee tents because they worked to survive out in mother nature for thousands of years. Everyone knows a symbol of a tepee on a road sign is the sign symbol used to say there are camp grounds near by off the roadways. Which just goes to show you that even in today's modern world a tepee is the symbol recognized for camping pretty much world wide. Simple one pole design, easy set-up and down, and time tested to be a superior travel tent is what has made me look into tepee tents for my motorcycle camping travels. The Tentipi seems to fit what I am looking for in a tent that I can travel with as a trusted living shelter. I just want information so I know what to expect from a Tentipi tent before I would made a mistake ordering one. The Kifaru tepee is my second choice of tent, but do I need a stove, not sure I need a stove in either tent. What do you think about the use of a stove in one? Are they worth the weight of carrying one to use for heat and cooking? Does anyone use the Kifaru fold flat stove, how are they to use? I know the Kifaru fold flat stove will defiantly be the one portable stove I'll buy for my Tentipi to use in very cold winter weather. There just seems to be something about these tents I must say I am very impressed with the Tentipi Safir tents. I'm just not sure of which size or if canvas CP or Light fabric is better as weight and size can be a problem when weight limiting what your motorcycle can carry. So let me hear your opinions and please post pictures if you have any of your tent. Thank you for any help you can offer me.





Last edited by Bertrand; 9 Aug 2009 at 12:31. Reason: font oversize
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  #2  
Old 1 Aug 2009
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There are a lot of manufactureres of teepee's other than tentipi some of which are cheaper. Search Google using the term "Lavvu"

I had a lightweight 5 man Tentipi but I had to send it back as it leaked. The problem was caused by the Estonian factory using a local thread to sew up the tent and not the one supplied by Tentipi. This issue will be sorted by now but make sure you check it by hosing it down.

I like the look of these Helsport Lavvu.

Lavvu | Helsport | Tents - English | Catalog Tents | Lavvu | Helsport
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  #3  
Old 7 Aug 2009
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Hi FlyingDoctor,

Where was your tent leaking?

I am the recent owner of a Zirkon 7 and in the rain on the second night of use I got wet from it coming in the top. I had the "top hat" closed, but the rain forced its way in anyway. I was a bit underimpressed, as I thought these were impervious to the elements, but maybe I had missed something?

Pic here.
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  #4  
Old 7 Aug 2009
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Tentipi

Hi Transmaniacon, I have a 7 year old 5 pers canvas Moskuselvkåtan, who became Tentipi to make international market profile. This may be one of the best tents available, but I believe it would be unsuited to your purpose if you are travelling alone, and have a weight/space limit. You would have to live with some very significant downsides. It weighs at least 8.8 kg dry, packs with poles and groundsheet into a 70 x 30 cm duffel, and is a very noticeable colour , which is always a disadvantage for wildcamping, and cannot be stored wet for more than a day, needing a lot of space to dry, or just to put it up. There is no separate sleeping area, I use a mosquito net, which is always getting in my way, but which I can also use in cheap hotels.
On the other hand, canvas breathes, mine is still waterproof, you can have a campfire, or stove, it is a joy to set up and down compared to any other tent in any kind of weather, the ventilation system actually works, and the materials and workmanship, on my tent, are first class. Moving production to Estonia is definitely not a good sign. I too have had rain forced through the “top”, but this was a storm that was toppling trees, and we were snug enough, and with extra guy ropes (?) the tent held. I really appreciate the advantages; being able to stand up, easy erection and no condensation, plus the tent is ‘cool’, sort of ‘mother of all other tents cool’, and the light inside at night makes it glow. There is some light through the canvas in daytime, or with the midnight sun.
I have used it a lot, mainly with several people, or if I am staying in one place for a while, like for fishing or hunting. I originally bought it for winter camping, my family is interested in dog racing on ski’s, and it has always performed well. There is a problem with the area you need to pitch this tent, if you find somewhere this big in the woods you are very lucky, but on snow, or in campsites and meadows it is no problem. My teenage daughter regularly packs in 8 – 10 friends, and the tent has survived, just had to straighten the pole one time, but they have no fire or stoves.
Let us know how you get on, re-reading your post I think you have already convinced yourself.
Good luck
Peter, in Oslo
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  #5  
Old 8 Aug 2009
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Hi There, I have been using a tentipi -Moskoselkatan for travelling for about 8 yrs now. They are really wonderful tents and yes very expensive.
I have had both an arran with the heavy duty floor and now have a tapp varrie model both in canvas. I sold the arran and as I wanted the extra features of the Tapp varrie. If travelling solo then the size weight should not be a major problem but if two up the tent takes up about the same amount of room as a large 3 person tunnel tent. but in ncanvas weighs about 8.8 kilo. I never found this problem but it depends on your own setup. I would without any doubt whatsoever say that whichever model you buy get the inner tent the difference is huge in usability the packed up size and weight is of little difference. I have used the tent from the far north Arctic regions and down to the meditereanean sea (Hot) The ventilation in hot climates is excellent better than most other tents I have seen or been in. The inner tent helps prevent water ingress in bad conditions, raises the internal temperature a few degrees in arctic weather, keeps mossies at bay and stops any condensation. Its really the difference between a decent tent and a great tent. (Idid use just the floor set up for several years and suffered mossies, water ingress, and wind lifting the sides of the tent. It really does limit the tent a lot. The good points - The canvas model is very strong and will withstand huge winds and weather -but some dampness and minor water ingress can sometimes happen in very heavy rain/ wind conditions - you have to live with that. however a simple modification to the top hat area will very much reduce rain water ingress, the problem is that when wind blows strong against the side of the tent water is pushed up the side and finds its way over the top edge of the tent and under the bottom edge of the top hat area, if you have a reversed flap sewn around the top edge of the tent it in effect creates a gulley where the water cannot push over but it does not interfere with the top hat design or use. (I used a 1 inch nylon tape to do this and hand sewed it round the top edge as well as sewing the bottom edge onto the seam at the 8 seams it really works well - however you should not have to do this on a tent of this quality it is a solution to the problem) The tent is easy to heat with a lamp, stove or fire and allows you to dry out wet gear and get really warm even in freezing climates. The tent can be used even when very wet and will not go mouldy just cos its damp if packed up for afew days but will need to be dried out at some stage but using it and heating it will dry it out anyway, It is however bulky to dry but in sun and or cool wind laid over the top of your bike or a fence will dry within an hour or so. The ground area that the tent needs can be a problem you need reasonably level ground and its a large area even on the 5 man the 7 or 9 will be huge, The tent requires a pitch where it can be pegged out otherwise it simply will not work, I have used pitches where I have tied the tent to roots and bits of wood as some area of the ground was not peggable its not ideal but can be done, You really do need to accept that you need to site the tent carefully and searching for a good piece of land is a consideration you need to add to your daily routine. Yet again It has rarely been a problem for me and the tent has been used in most conditions and areas, once up mind you it becomes so much more livable than other tents on some occasions in stormy weather I have had other seeking shelter in my tent when there own tents were struggling and uncomfortable I have also had 8 adults all seated in a circle sheltering out of a blizzard and having a coffee ! The canvas version versus the nylon is a good argument - the nylon is a lot lighter and packs smaller but it really catches the wind, flaps about a lot and from what i have heard from a user is not as strong - more liable to rip - there tent ripped an anchor point in a severe storm however almost every other tent in the site was flattened so I suppose that still speaks volumes. Putting up the tent takes some degree of practice to get it right but its very quick and easy once you get the knack. The light in the tent is great a really nice warm glow and even better with the inner tent - honest. I have several very expensive mountain tents, and 95% of the time I pick up the Tipi as its few disadvantages far outweigh all the dissadvantages of the other tents its a tent you can live in in comfort for days or weeks on end - with the ability to cook, wash yourself down, clean and dry clothes and stay very warm or cool away from the elements or insects - not one other tent I have fulfils all of that criteria. The quality is exceptional. Major weak point is main pole failure, if you buy one negotiate an extra couple of pole pieces. Feel free to pm me for more info i could e mail you pictures of the tent and answer any more questions you have. As Gs Peter says the tent in canvas is very visable and cannot be tucked away out of sight if your wanting to be unseen.

Last edited by adventure950; 8 Aug 2009 at 11:23.
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  #6  
Old 9 Aug 2009
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Further information re the tipi. I now carry two spare pole parts in case of pole failure however on my arran model I bought a pair of hardwood dowels that were the right diameter to fit inside the metal pole, The ends were turned down to fit the recess end of the poles and glued and pushed inside the alloy, they added a little bit of weight but made the poles immensely strong I never had a pole failure after that. Tentipi state they have improved the ples using a stronger alloy and thicker wall design now.
Using a fire it can be done but I think s best suited to a larger 7/9man tent you do get a lot of soot around the top hole, and you really need to get the wind right to get good ventilation once the fires hot its great and for drying wet stuff out ashort few hours really does the job but you do have to be careful I once misjudged the wood I was using it ended up so much heat it was like being in a blast furnace and the wood caught it got a bit to much be warned, In arctic areas I use a heat pal it gives a real steady slow heat keeps the tent at about 5-10 degrees inside overnight without any fiddling about - its safe and you can cook on it - problem is its bulky and you need fuel for it. The bulk is not so bad if you put the large basket over the ends of your tent they fit well on the 5 man, then there is only the dish /fuel carrier which is not so much bigger than most stoves. Yet again depends on the bike your using and if you one or two up. Heat pals seem to be cheaper from boat stores, I also have a really small military fire box 1/4 size of the tent tipi one its ideal for a small fire in the 5 man. The tentipi firebox I think is still to big in the 5 man tent - i did use one for a while but thought it not so practical.
Last and very practical are both a normal stove or lamp both work well in various climates but all the heaters except a real fire seem to cause some condensation. If left on to long.
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Old 11 Aug 2009
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Hi Adventure950, that sounds a good tip about the extra tape on the top vent - I can't PM you yet - too new! - but will ask you for a picture when I've gained PM privileges
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Old 11 Aug 2009
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highwaylass have sent you an e mail.
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  #9  
Old 6 Sep 2009
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I like my Kifaru 6 man tent. For all the reasons you mentioned.
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  #10  
Old 25 Oct 2009
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I've got the 7 man light version.

The CP to me is not practical if you're 2up on a bike, but the light is OK.
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  #11  
Old 19 Jan 2010
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Tepee Tents

I was just doing research in my own search for a tipi tent and came across these posts. I would just like to add that I have found a very lightweight stove made of titanium that packs down flat. I think it would be ideal for any cross country travel. You can find it at Titanium Goat . They also sell tipi tents. Hope this info is not too late for your search.
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  #12  
Old 10 Mar 2014
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I like the Guide Gear TeePee a lot. It is spacious, solid, and very easy to set up. My only problem with it is that it is a single wall tent, so condensation can be a problem on cold nights. It is completely waterproof otherwise.
Here is an extended review of the tent
Guide Gear Tee Pee
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