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Camping Equipment and all Clothing Tents, sleeping bags, stoves etc. Riding clothing, boots, helmets, what to wear when not riding, etc.
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  #1  
Old 12 Oct 2011
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How Many Sets Of Clothes?

Good morning all

OK Ellen and I have started get our total gear together to work out space etc.

We are planning to be on the road for approx 18 months plus, riding from Alaska to Ushuaia so it will be arctic - equator - arctic.

At this stage we have allowed one set of clothes to be wearing, one that may have been worn ready for washing at first available point and one clean set ready to go, so three sets in total.

We are wearing Icebreakers complete which are good for fending off smells for a bit longer as you will know.

A set to us means, the shirt, gruds, longjohns, long sleeve top and a pair of socks.

We will have 2 extra pairs of socks and gruds, a pair of non riding pants, shorts and a puffy jacket for the cold.

So our question is to those who are experience in this is our take about right, excessive or not quite enough.

We are trying hit the happy medium between traveling lite enough and being comfortable as we can as well.

Input welcomed, many thanks Andi & Ellen
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Old 12 Oct 2011
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I popped over to your website to see what you are planning. Nice website by the way. It looks like you are taking two bikes and everything fits. Could you take less? Of course. Will you use everything you are taking? Probably so.

There is no perfect set of gear and clothing when traveling from Deadhorse to Ushuaia that will suit every rider. Part of the fun of travel is finding the balance that works for you. Just be thankful that you have 18 months of travel time.

Things that I have learned:

Black jeans and tee shirt don't show the dirt and look presentable even after changing a tire in the dirt.

Waterproof breathable riding jacket and pants keep your black jeans and tee shirt much cleaner for much longer even when riding dusty backroads and through swarms of bugs at sunset.

All I really need are riding boots, riding jacket, riding pants, good helmet, riding gloves, black jeans, black tee shirt, down jacket, good long underwear, and two good pairs of socks. All other clothes are gravy.

The higher you ride the cooler it gets. If it's sweltering in the lowlands head into the mountains to camp.

The lower you ride the warmer it gets. If it's freezing in the mountains head for the beach.

You can buy things along the way instead of bringing everything you think you might need.

If something hasn't been used in a month it usually is time to get rid of it if it isn't essential to fixing the bike.

A positive mental attitude is the most important thing to not leave home without.


Have fun!

Kindest regards,
John Downs
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Last edited by John Downs; 12 Oct 2011 at 23:35.
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Old 13 Oct 2011
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Heya John

Many thanks for your reply, I have read your RR on ADV too, great report and info to be had which is cool.

We are very happy to have 18 months travel time and this maybe be more yet depending on money, we will see.

Thank you very much for your kind words on our site, this is the first time we have ever done anything like it so kinda cool just getting up off the deck to this level so far, we are propelling ourselves into the new technology age....I still find spanners easier to use.

Basically ALL items will have to serve at least two or more purposes as they are home and contents for the duration.

We can fit the clothing into compression sacks and that makes a huge difference to available space but unfortunately no weight loss.

I hear what you are saying about nothing is the prefect setup and we will have probably kit up for the high altitude colder parts of the trip.

At this stage with our clothing allocation we are not full and if we can help it don't want to be, food will expand and contract depending on how much we carry.

One thing I am not a fan off is hanging lots of crap off everything but rather neat and tidily stored and accessible, gotta try and hit that happy medium.
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Old 13 Oct 2011
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I'm guessing I have about as minimal a setup as is possible and still be prepared for riding all the way down to freezing.

I use only two full sets of clothes (t-shirts, pants, socks, underwear), one worn the other packed away (and washed as soon as possible in the closest sink). However I carry an extra t-shirt because I spend lots of time camping and the shirts get dirty/smelly the fastest.

I carry 2 long-sleeve shirts, one thin for mosquito protection the other a warm base layer for temperatures approaching freezing (below 45F).

I use all synthetic fabrics because they dry faster and pack smaller.

I use layers prolifically to stay comfortable.

I reuse my rain liner in the jacket as a windbreaker around town along with its warm zip-out liner if it is cold.

My pants (2) have zip-off legs so they can double as shorts or swim trunks.
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Old 13 Oct 2011
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I like the way you think with minimal, we have the same or similar approach.

In a compression sack I can fit one complete lot of clothing down to about 200 mm long x 180 mm wide so it packs down well.

Just trying to avoid taking stuff that won't get used however in rainy times having nice clean dry duds to climb into might be good mind food.

We too pondered about separate wet gear, we will be using Cordura gear but it is only water resistant in my view thus a separate rain jacket and leggings are on our take it list.

We talked of having a separate wet jacket to be seen in public and wear when our riding jackets are wet and probably muddy too but one has to cut the list off somewhere hence this thread to gather help from those on the ground.

Appreciate your input guys.
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  #6  
Old 13 Oct 2011
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Hi Andi,

As you know, we were travelling 2up, I took:

riding jacket, pants, gloves, boots.
1 pair of zip off lightweght hiking pants
1 pair of swim/sleep shorts
1 set long johns and long sleeved top (icebreaker)
3 underwear
3 pairs socks
3 T shirts
lighweight fleece jacket/hoody
gore tex jacket and pants - regular hiking gear.
liner gloves
wooly hat
neckover
Keen sandals with covered toes

When it was bloody cold - Bolivia/Peru altiplano and Patagonia - I would wear long johns under riding pants, icebreaker top, t shirt, fleece, riding jacket and pants and gore tex over the top.

the set of gore tex or similar is the key, keeps the wind/rain out and keeps your clothing dry, so you dont need to carry so much spare gear. In CA you might get a lot of rain, sometimes its too hot to wear waterproofs....

i used dark grey BMW 'City Jeans' - which scrubbed up ok and were nice and warm when it was cold.

good advice there from John about adjusting your elevation - very apt for SA.

What would I do differently? I woud have started with 1 or 2 T shirts and the icebreaker top - and bought some clothing en route if required.

If your schedule allows, you guys are welcome to stay with me and Lisa for a Beer or 5, some Alberta beef, an oil change for the DR's and laundry! (Ive always got a few DR oil filters!)
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Old 13 Oct 2011
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Heya Grif

Yeah great info thanks mate, we are very lucky that Ellen is riding so we have 2 bikes to spread the load over so little more space to play with although in the interest of keeping the weight down cos neither of us are Arnold Schwarzenegger type builds so we don't want the kitchen sink.

Been building our luggage racks and looking at the photos you sent through to me which have been a huge help.

Hopefully next week I will get back onto them, just been so busy with other stuff (work).

We would love to catch up for sure, we are supposed to be going to see some people in Calgary too just around the corner from you 130 km away.

Are you planning to be home around late June early July ish?, we plan on attending the 20th anniversary of the D2D kinda 21st ish of June then we will be on our way toward your place (looked on google earth...ya lawn needs mowing )

That is 3016 km away, so if we averaged say 754km per hour we could be there just after lunch.

So ok, we will be into touch closer to the time but if you are there we will definitely stop by.
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Old 13 Oct 2011
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Sounds like a great time.

Start working the gear into your lives prior to leaving on your trip. Know what works and find out what your willing to manage day-to-day. Start washing your clothes in the sink or in the shower at home. If your camping, source some food on the way home tonight and cook it on your stove. Spend some time setting up and sleeping in your tent, in the rain. All this effort will pay dividends while on the road. The more you know, the less you need. The knowledge and confidence you carry in your head takes up no volume and weighs nothing.

Another site that might prove useful: http://www.vagabondjourney.com/

daryl

Last edited by dlh62c; 13 Oct 2011 at 19:04.
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Old 13 Oct 2011
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Andi,

We should be around then, I will put some steaks on and expect you for a late lunch............ D2D should be a good hoot

The hard part is all the crap you have to do at home before you hit the road.......
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Old 13 Oct 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dlh62c View Post
Sounds like a great time.

Start working the gear into your lives prior to leaving on your trip. Know what works and find out what your willing to manage day-to-day. Start washing your clothes in the sink or in the shower at home. If your camping, source some food on the way home tonight and cook it on your stove. Spend some time setting up and sleeping in your tent, in the rain. All this effort will pay dividends while on the road. The more you know, the less you need. The knowledge and confidence you carry in your head takes up no volume and weighs nothing.

Another site that might prove useful: Vagabond Journey Budget Travel Guide

daryl
Great site and info thanks Daryl, have bookmarked that.

Both my wife and I have camped our way around the world in Europe, Scandi and Iceland etc so we are well versed at that, just gotta get the happy medium between enough and under prepared, very fine line as you know.

I have done some big touring trips in the past but not away 18 months plus in totally different countries.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gipper View Post
Andi,

We should be around then, I will put some steaks on and expect you for a late lunch............ D2D should be a good hoot

The hard part is all the crap you have to do at home before you hit the road.......
Good man, look forward to catching up, the harder part is costing us $10k just to get to the start line plus all our gear and bikes ... that is a lot of time on the road and a huge bash on the wallet, anyway good times ahead.

We only need to get our visas sussed out completely, this also involves about $1500.00 in flights to have an interview with the US consulate up north to see if we are even allowed in America, never mind gotta happen.

On the visa notes is there anything specific needed for South America?
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Old 14 Oct 2011
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Nothing for a Brit and a Canadian for:

Colombia
Equador
Peru
Bolivia
Chile
Argentina

Someone else might be able to fill in the blanks for: Brazil/Parag/Urag/Venez.

Check for your nationalities though.

If you ever plan to land by air in Chile it might cost you - Canadians/Americans get dinged $132 USD, Brits are free!!

The key words for any interviews for the USA customs and immigration is 'Transiting' to either Canada or Mexico

Sounds like a real PITA
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Old 14 Oct 2011
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Two sets of regular clothes, sized so that you can wear all of them at once--this might only happen once or twice, but when it's suddenly near freezing, raining or snowing and windy and you've got a long way to go to the next town, you'll be thankful.

Extra socks and underwear. You'll constantly be handwashing these, and it's nice to have four pair or so.

Just one of each: armored riding jacket and pants; additional goretex jacket and pants sized to go over or under your riding clothes (because otherwise you'll get wet sooner or later, and wet in a cold climate is unsafe); long underwear top and bottom; neck gaiter and skullcap for under helmet.

Plus: Hippo Hands. Overboots if you're using permeable MX boots like I do. Maybe a spare pair of gloves.

Saying "Just head to lower elevation if you're cold" doesn't really work unless you're indifferent to where you go. Even if you try to stay low, there are passes to cross, there are high plateaus like the Altiplano, and there are places where there are no low-elevation alternatives. In the far south or far north, low elevation won't keep you warm--one of my coldest days ever was at sea level in the fog in northern Norway. Also to be factored in: misjudging your schedule so that your planned journey during the crisp, clear days of autumn ends up taking place during the blowing rains of early winter...or whatever.

Buying clothing as needed locally is another approach, but I like to carry the necessary stuff with me from home. YMMV.

Mark
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Old 14 Oct 2011
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Sounds like you got it under control.

Something that works for me during cold rides has been a product called 'Wristies'. They cover that little bit of exposed skin between your jacket cuff and gloves. Their great for camping on cold nights too.

Short Wristies - 800-811-8290 -- Fingerless gloves, glove-liners, Sleeves, and so much more!

daryl
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Old 14 Oct 2011
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Some additional thoughts based on the above replies:

When riding, stopping all wind and rain from getting to your skin is more important than anything else! If even a tiny breeze gets past your gloves up your sleeves, find a way to stop it. Have something to protect your neck as well, I have a fleece thing designed for skiing which I wear in any temperature below 60F and it makes a huge difference! Layers are also your friend, the more the better!

I like rain liners for my gear instead of something that goes over because they do not get muddy. In rainy or cold locations (Canada/Alaska this year), I wore my rain gear frequently when off the bike, both to stay dry and to stay warm. Better than integrating in the riding gear because of the extra layers (always good).

All my clothing fits in approximately a 10" x 4" x 4" space without using compression sacks. Add on my rain gear, neck-gator, and heated grips, and I have never been cold all the way down to freezing. But on really cold days I will be wearing most of the clothing I am carrying. I had more clothing originally but dumped it when I realized it was never being used.
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Old 15 Oct 2011
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[QUOTE=othalan;352510]Some additional thoughts based on the above replies:


"I like rain liners for my gear instead of something that goes over because they do not get muddy. In rainy or cold locations (Canada/Alaska this year), I wore my rain gear frequently when off the bike, both to stay dry and to stay warm''

Im presuming though that your riding suit will then get muddy instead ?

I would have thought it would be easier to wipe clean your external rain gear rather than a suit made of cordura or similar where the mud etc is more likely to get ingrained into the material?

Also your last sentence in that paragraph-
Better than integrating in the riding gear because of the extra layers (always good).

Did you mean "better to integrate in the riding gear" rather than "better than integrating in the riding gear" Sorry Im about confused about what you meant.

Cheers,

James
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