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  #1  
Old 20 Nov 2008
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Spare parts

I am planning a trip from Cairo to Cape Town on a BMW 1200 GS. What kind of spare parts would i need to take along?
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  #2  
Old 21 Nov 2008
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Tough question!

You do not write through which countries you plan to ride... as is an AK-47, bulletprof vest, etc could be prudent to bring along


My thoughts goes to the fuel injection contraption:
WiTech (HPN?) used to rebuild the GS with Bing 40mm - that would ensure in a safe way that you do have petrol reaching the engine.
You will need tires, but I recon you either buy on the road or see to send to pre-planed service stops.
There are questions presented concerning the bevelbox and shaft.

Bring a spare rectifyer to the generator!
Bring spare wires! (gas, clutch)
Enhance petrol carrying capacity.
Basic tools.
Kits to repair puncture = bring proper tire-irons(?) usable to a lot of other things to.
I like these:
http://www.biltema.se/Archive/Produc...e/10-201_l.jpg
Biltema Sverige part.no. 10-201
I like these to:
http://www.biltema.se/Archive/Produc...e/10-204_l.jpg
part.no. 10-204
Water containers!

And a lot more "standard" equipment for when on the road.
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  #3  
Old 22 Nov 2008
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Spare parts

Thanks Albert

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  #4  
Old 22 Nov 2008
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Thanks Wadi.

I was a bit affraid that my brittish humor might have been too off.

Of cause there are hazards when travelling - there are places one should not enter.

As for parts.
All I have heard concerning the 1200GS is that there is some issues with the bevelbox and shaft - you need to look that up. BMW Motorcycle Owners of America is a good source. Iron butt another, Internet Riders something a third.

The rectifyer/regulator that is bolted on the generator is small and tends to brake when it shouldn't. Wires never brake... well they always do at awkward situations... plugs will go bad as will HT-leads and plug-caps...
And as I wrote - I am no fan of fuel-injection; way too "risky" - good when it works, but quite stalling when broken... I would recommend Dell'Orto PHM 38-40 - the least problematic (KISS) - Motorworks - BMW Motorcycle Spares - home

What I know of these modern bikes is very limited, but I guess it is all right to "transpose" what I know about the /7 generations.
You can -never- carry too much petrol...
You can never carry too much water...
That is where I would place my focus - to enhance these capacites.

How much spare oil you need to bring along is another matter. I have no clue.

Strengthen the frame where it need to be if there are such places.
Get the largest panniers you can get! I love Grand Tour that are made by SJM, Stefan Julsgårds Mekaniska, 55L each for the sidepanniers and 80L for the top-box - fiberglass (in standard - can be widened to any width). Stefan made these back in 1980 when there were no large size panniers on the market. He needed them for his trip to Sahara in 1980/81.
Look at ATV plastic as an option to the alu-panniers (www.louis.de - Motorrad & Freizeit) !

Make a set of fitting handlebar muffs from lorry/truck-trailer canvas => keep the chilling temps out and protect the hands in rain as well as the switches.
Make a special fiting bike-cover when the bike is ready equipped - you need to be able to protect it when parking from rain; and from freezing at night.
Carry spare tires and tubes! I know the rims are tubless type - but it is far easier to mend a leaking tube than a leaking tire...

Odyssey battery goes without telling.

Would Öhlins or Engans Dust covers for your shock be usefull in sandy areas - or would that cause more problem?

As for gearbox oil - I would strongly recommend Omega 690 80W/90 GL7 for a trip such as this. Distributörer av Omega olja och fett såsom smörjolja och smörjfett - Smörjteknik Norden AB (links to retainer in egypt can be found via the Swedish site - or type Omega Lubrication Ltd on google).

You will need extra bulbs for the drivinglamp, perhaps install extra driving lights. I have tested Hella 1000 Rally, FF200, 3000 Compact, etc and I am not really please with any of them... xenon is to freeking expensive but will give you a very good driving light (there are animals all over that do not respect any traffic rules/regulations... we have elks, reinders, boars and Svenssons(=Smiths)).

A good torch is prudent - diod options are really good; otherwise use 12V flurencent sincve these give off more light drawing less Ah than ordinary bulbs.
A 12V sunlight charger mounted on top of the top-box could be a good extra source to keep the battery charged. Conrad Electronic - Europas führendes Versandhandelsunternehmen für Elektronik und Technik
Check the market for diod-light options to the ordinary bulbs.

Then you have the whole situation with food, clothes, heating capacity (cooking all drinkingwater), etc - you need large panniers! -

Looking forward to see others input to your question to - so that I can learn more too on this topic/subject.
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  #5  
Old 26 Nov 2008
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"And as I wrote - I am no fan of fuel-injection; way too "risky" - good when it works, but quite stalling when broken... I would recommend Dell'Orto PHM 38-40 - the least problematic (KISS) - Motorworks - BMW Motorcycle Spares - home "

I am not sure, but can you change the fuel injection of r1200gs with Dellorto? Do you know somebody who have done it? Cost? Thanks.
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  #6  
Old 26 Nov 2008
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No. I do not know anyone who have converted a 1200 - it is not legal now in EU to swap the fuelinjection for carbs... it can be done - it was Witecs solution on the Cobra (asphalt cutting machine) editions of the 1100GS back in 1994-1996:ish.

Here are some links to get you started. I hope I do not overstep the regulations by posting them...

WITEC Motorsport GmbH
but there seems to be something wrong with Witecs homepage...

The BMW R GS WITEC special versions

BMW Motorrad Motorsport Endurance – Wikipedia

This is what I saw back in 1995:
BMW GS-Umbauten

Here is a useful site for you:
Rainer's Australien Abenteuer Outback-Guide: Australien-Links - Motorrad (TRansport, Zulassung, Zubehör, Ersatzteile, Kleinanzeigen, GPS, Refien, HErsteller, Foren, Zeitschriften, Links)
These guys test what you are going to do on the African coninent.


BMW R1100GS Zubehör

Boxer-Design | BMW Motorrad Veredler | update your bike | Home

Das Boxer Forum - Das Internet Forum für alle BMW Boxer-Freunde.

Rokis GS Page

You will find what you need -
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  #7  
Old 26 Nov 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dc lindberg View Post
You can -never- carry too much petrol...
You can never carry too much water...

Get the largest panniers you can get!

You will need extra bulbs for the drivinglamp, perhaps install extra driving lights.
Following this advice you will end up with too much stuff!!!! Or a very large truck.

Less is more. Keep It Simple S.

Changing an EFI bike to carbs is not easy .. much easier to just buy another bike!!!!!! I'd not consider changing any oilhead to carbs .. way too much work. Consider that the EFI brain provides the spark .. so you are still going to have the EFI brain, hall effect sensors, temperature sensors, knock sensors ...

EFI systems are reliable. They are not as easy to field fix. The key is understanding what goes on with the EFI system. HPN did that carby swap for rapid field fixes .. under racing conditions. A tourer has a LOT more time.

-----------------------------------
Modern bikes run alternators .. not generators. On the oilhead bms the reg is a bosch regulator .. I'd bet a car one can be substituted ... and they are reliable ..

-----------------------------------------
Don't ride at night ... then you will not need the driving lights ... and saves some weight, money. You got to sleep some time .. may as well be at night!

-------------------------------------------
Specific to the R12 .. well oilheads -
Put on a new alternator belt and run it for at least a month before you take off. These belts have been known to fail.
Read up on the R12 canbuss sytem. Read up on the R12 EFI system. In particular the fuel pump controller failure work around - see UKGSer :::: For BMW GS Enthusiasts for a write up. Read and understand the systems on the bike .. that will help is anything does go wrong.

Albert - ... don't know what to say .. You can carry too much - overload the bike and you have a very bad trip. Big panniers just encorage more gear = more weight .... remember less is more.

The original post was about what spare parts to carry .. not equiping the bike ... General Guide = take only those spares that you know will fail or a high probablity of failure. Any part that will ware out during the trip should be replaced at least a month before starting out. And that is it ...
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  #8  
Old 27 Nov 2008
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My wife and I are currently riding around the world (two -up) on our 1150GS. We went through Africa, Middle East etc.
I carry very little spares and tools, but it depends how much time you have. We have plenty time.
If you need parts on the way, there are a nice BMW Motorcycle dealer in Nairobi. I needed some parts while in Malawi and ordered it from the BMW car dealer, although they do not sell bikes, they have the bike parts listed on their system and will order anything you need, it will just take time. I'm sure that aplies for all BMW car dealers, and they are in every capital city in Africa.

I carry the following tools and spares with me:
Puncture repair kit with extra plugs, compressor. (I used that a lot)
Altenator belt. (Never used it)
Fuel filter
Standard tool kit that comes with the bike with extra pliers and shifting spanner.
Cable ties and Silicone.

You will probibly need tires in Nairobi, and can make sure the dealer there has it in stock before you arive. I got mine flown in to Arusha by someone who visited me there from RSA.


Good luck and enjoy

johan
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Old 27 Nov 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frank Warner View Post
Following this advice you will end up with too much stuff!!!! Or a very large truck.

Less is more. Keep It Simple S.

Albert - ... don't know what to say .. You can carry too much - overload the bike and you have a very bad trip. Big panniers just encorage more gear = more weight .... remember less is more.

The original post was about what spare parts to carry .. not equiping the bike ... General Guide = take only those spares that you know will fail or a high probablity of failure. Any part that will ware out during the trip should be replaced at least a month before starting out. And that is it ...
Exactly Frank -
You took me litterally with no limit assumption. You too know that a 24L tank is far more prudent than a 18L and a Huskey tank is more prudent than a stock 24L - when going into the bush. I do however prefer different containers/canisters = if the bike smashes one, there is a second spare. Limit for petrol is; a bike that can be handled - I'd say somewhere around 30-40L even though there are tanks on up top 45L (if I recall correctly).
As for water - usually I see people bring a pint (0.5L) to larger Coke (1.5L). This is ok when on ordinary roads with shops and people around the corner so to speak - but when you're going off into the bushes so to speak; bring water in a supply that covers at least a couple of days (ca 5L/day).
As for the other recommendations:
changes, shelter, spareparts, etc - can be bolted on the bike or put inside panniers; I prefere inside panniers = dry and keeps bugs and creaps out as well. I never wrote -fill- the panniers... did I -
Panniers also have some other aspects - protecting the legs when falling over, gives leverage when needed to lift up, pull and push, frame stabilization. Easy to lighten the bike when need be - just take off the panniers; if it rains does not matter for the content; if tied to the bike => more work and can not be placed un a wet and muddy ground less one accepts even more work...

Yes - ALL extra stuff weighs, and ALL extra weight is something one swears madly about when stuck somewhere!!! I ride at winter - the opposite conditions to Wadis planned tour. I used to tie down the canvas cover to the bike on pillionseat - now I used the top-box to pack the cover in. I allways carry a 5L petrol can when on longer rides - does not matter if I use that petrol; it is my "in case of" spare volume. I also always carry a spare snowmobileoverall. Thats two (2) panniers filled and the extra weight is about 2-3kg merely. In africa - conditions are vastly different; opposite so to speak; but in africa there is heat, rain, bugs and creaps instead.

Of cause he shall load as lightly as he can -
Petrol and water are really essential - that is where I recommend him to focus on enhancement options.

*
I did not adress spare choices - I drive /7 modells. I did recommend Wadi to look-up what the 1200 is prone to need. Planning a long drive/ride - demands full planning, hence my approach to trigger this very good and elusive discussion that have emerged -
*
Alternator = Generator ; may differ between languages. Yes - stock car regulator/rectifyer - and it is a really expensive one to that is used on the modern Bosch "electric production units" as compared to the older. About 100USD (!) as comapred to about 10USD. Two major options available; Bosch and Hella - I buy patterns.
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Last edited by dc lindberg; 27 Nov 2008 at 06:52.
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Old 27 Nov 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jc View Post
My wife and I are currently riding around the world (two -up) on our 1150GS. We went through Africa, Middle East etc.
I carry very little spares and tools, but it depends how much time you have. We have plenty time.
If you need parts on the way, there are a nice BMW Motorcycle dealer in Nairobi. I needed some parts while in Malawi and ordered it from the BMW car dealer, although they do not sell bikes, they have the bike parts listed on their system and will order anything you need, it will just take time. I'm sure that aplies for all BMW car dealers, and they are in every capital city in Africa.

I carry the following tools and spares with me:
Puncture repair kit with extra plugs, compressor. (I used that a lot)
Altenator belt. (Never used it)
Fuel filter
Standard tool kit that comes with the bike with extra pliers and shifting spanner.
Cable ties and Silicone.

You will probibly need tires in Nairobi, and can make sure the dealer there has it in stock before you arive. I got mine flown in to Arusha by someone who visited me there from RSA.


Good luck and enjoy

johan
I agree with Johan and yes the electronic parts catalogue from BMW is comprehensive and cover all car and bike models in the same programme. One problem with this though is that the parts salesman might not know enough about the bike models and the many variants to make sure the right items are ordered. Never get parts without using your VIN no.

At the same time I do believe that the bigger the fuel range on your bike as well as the capacity to carry life supporting liquids will allow you to travel routes otherwise impossible.
But be careful not to over load your bike, this might be the cause of needing extra parts on account of falling over to much or cracked and broken frames.
Take only items that you need to survive with and if your bike is older or have a lot of mileage, rather replace the parts you are not sure will make it with new ones before starting your trip with and leave the old ones with someone that can ship them to you should you get stuck.

Forget about the carbs on your 1200. The fuel injection systems are very reliable and the chances of it letting you down is really slim. Fuel injection does also increase your fuel range without carrying the extra bulk and weight of petrol and it is virtually maintenance free. When fuel injection does brake down it will bring you to a complete standstill, but so will a dropped valve as well, or a broken U-joint on the drive shaft but you can't carry a backup for all these likely hoods and even if you could take with a support crew with enough spares to build a complete new bike, you might hit a goat in the road and brake your foot. So as you can see you cannot cover all possibilities and I recommend to look at the most likely things that can happen and some that will happen and make sure you are well covered for those instances like for example, having a flat tire. To only rely on the repair kit supplied with the bike can be futile. You will need a pump because the CO2 cylinders can run out and a pump has unlimited supply of air as long as there is an atmosphere and a mussel in your arm. Extra tubes will also be a good idea but 1st try and repair your tire tubeless if you can and reserve the tube for when the bead came of the rim and you can't get enough air in to get to seal all the way around or when the hole is too large or through the sidewall. You must take at least one substantial tyre lever as it is much tougher to remove a tyre from a tubeless rim than a standard rim. For the second lever you can get hold of one of the really short ones, in this way you lever with the long tire lever and and put the short one right next to the long one after levering of a section. The short one will then hold the tire from slipping back while you remove your longer lever and move it over to lever over another section.
Having one short lever is just one way to save on weight as tire levers can be very heavy.

BMW's toolkit supplied with the bikes were normally very good and comprehensive enough to cover all basic repairs that can be done by the owner on the side of the road.
I don't know about the 1200 though as it was not supplied with a toolkit at the start but I think it was sold separately as an accessory. ????

Personally I do prefer the older GS' because they are much more maintainable in real remote areas and their simplicity makes it possible to make more comprehensive repairs in very basic workshops.

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Old 27 Nov 2008
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[QUOTE=dc lindberg;216304]
WiTech (HPN?) used to rebuild the GS with Bing 40mm - that would ensure in a safe way that you do have petrol reaching the engine.

* * * * * * * *
Abert,
I wonder what is the percentage of extra fuel the bike will consumpt when 40 mm Bing is installed instead of EFI ?

What I like is : this thread could be a useful book named: "Spares and needs of GS on the road"

Cheers,

Samy
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Old 27 Nov 2008
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Good!!! Now the debate, discussion, tips, recommendations, suggestions - the lot is on -
Read and study Wadi - the guys running 1100GS and 1200GS have given you lots of sound advice.

You need to weigh pro and con on all things you will bring; be it more petrol, water or maintenance things.

You do also have the medic-kit to develop/prepare. Talk with your doctor.
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Old 28 Nov 2008
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Just maintenance items for us

We did Germany to Cape Town just in the last year on an R100GS and an F650GS. I've recently bought an R1200GS so I know a bit about that as well.

When we rode down through Sudan we teamed up with four other riders, one of them on a beautifully prepared R100GS in true rally raid style. Big tank plus the small HPN tail tanks for a total of 50 L of fuel. Very nice. Somewhere in the middle of the Nubian desert his bike broke down. He had all the spare electrical parts that one normally takes for an airhead but it turned out to be the one part he didn't take, the regulator. He got on the sat phone (!) and called a friend back home to send a regulator ahead to Khartoum. The lesson learned was that you can't possibly carry all the spares you may or may not need. I lost the steering head nut from my bike and while the African solution of manufacturing a new nut worked just fine (OK riding without a steering head nut for 1,000 km was a bit unnerving) I was also able to contact a friend and send a new one down to Addis Ababa.

Nowhere on the trip did we need a range greater than 450 km so my 35L tank worked fine. Of course if you take a more adventurous route you may need more (e.g. Lake Turkana).

I would suggest that you don't need to carry a whole wack of spares, that a 450 km range is just fine for fuel load and that water was readily available except for a 100 km stretch of the Nubian desert and for several good stretches on the Moyale - Isiolo route.

Have fun planning!
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