Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > 4 wheels > 4WD Overland Tech

4WD Overland Tech GENERIC 4WD / 4 wheel TECH discussions and info that is valid for ALL brands. See brand specific forums.
Contact Overland Solutions for all your custom modifications and setup for overland travel.

Visit Matt Savage for VIAIR compressors, Air Lift Helper Springs, Tyre Levers, Chris Scott's Books & DVDs, KC Daylighters, Allisport Intercoolers, Overland Preparation and lots more!

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 8 Jun 2004
longroadtrip's Avatar
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: England
Posts: 36
roof tent, front or rear?

why do most people put there roof tents on the front? is it a weight thing? we were thinking about opening overthe rear door to provide shade.
__________________
www.longroadtripsouth.com
UK to SA in our 110
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 8 Jun 2004
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 863
I don't have one, but I believe it's so that you can move the vehicle whilst the tent is up (ie the supports fit to the bull-bar, rather than all the way to the ground).

Means you can find a level spot/shade/get closer to the bar etc.

Sam.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 8 Jun 2004
Runner's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 302
I fitted one last autumn and had this dilemma. Fitting over the rear (overhanging) means you have shade which you can also use as a possible shower tent/kitchen tent. Over the front gives possible mobility, as Sam's just said. Also the angle for the entry ladder is more vertical if you climb up from the rear (and hence a bit more queasy feeling when youve had a few sherberts!) and the whole ladder, being longer, flexes more (adding to the Brown Trouser Factor)

My requirement was that I didnt want to cut my roofrack any more than I had to and I have a row of spots above the windscreen on the front of the rack (looks damn silly but I fitted them after experiences driving in North Africa at night with flocks of goats and gormless cyclists without lights - I decided I want all the lighting I can get, to avoid two tons of Defender making kebab out of hapless goat and Bedu). My rack has a cut-out section at the rear anyway so all I had to do was remove a foot of bar as opposed to the whole front section plus lights.

Given a flat rack and no lights Id fit it to the front as I think the structure is basically more stable that way anyway. Mind you I know a guy who has his opening out solely onto the roof rack (no overhang). Very stable but you lose the entire rack!

Horses for courses.

(Edit; I can however drive with the tent pitched, just take the lower half of the ladder away and you can drive normally with the tent waggling about at the back. I have a friend who also does this)

[This message has been edited by Runner (edited 08 June 2004).]
__________________
'91 LR 110 Def/Disco hybrid "Elsa"
Bring me the horizon....
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 8 Jun 2004
ctc ctc is offline
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Lincolnshire, England
Posts: 249
You can also fit them so they hang out over the side of the vehicle (to one side or the other).

I have an eezy awn which folds out over the vehicle's rear. The tent also has a shower skirt option which is great when you have got a local audience watching your every move! Clearly you could not use a shower skirt option if you forward mounted the rooftent.

The forward mount is attractive though for the reasons mentioned in the previous post, however I think that perhaps it more of a psychological prop than anything else.

In a situation where you feel your personal security is threatened you would either hand over your keys and possesions or take a chance and drive off (probably leaving a proportion of your camping gear behind). Whether or not your rooftent is fully funtional after your experience would probably be a secondary consideration.

NB. If you wanted to prepare for such a situation you could I suppose modify the rooftent such that you can insert a support bar which would take the weight of the opened rooftent without resort to the ladder (which usually bears the weight of the extended half of the tent and occupants).
.......
Runner beat me to it on this post!


[This message has been edited by ctc (edited 08 June 2004).]
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 9 Jun 2004
Contributing Member
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Bracknell, UK
Posts: 38
The best example of a tent over the front must be Andy le May's from www.overlandy.co.uk .
He modified the roofrack and tent so that access can be gained via the front sunroof of his Discovery. Easy access into the tent and the rear of the vehicle!

I have to agree that over the rear the tent gives a little bit of shelter, esp. if you plan to use a gas cooker of the back door.

------------------
www.overland-network.com/bigsky
__________________
www.bigsky-adventures.com
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 9 Jun 2004
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: UK
Posts: 473
I used to have mine over the back and moved it up to the front. Mine sits on top of the roof rack side bars as I have spot lights mounted on the front of the rack and brake and indicator lights on the rear of the rack and haven't got round to redoing these so I can take the bars out. The downside to this is that the tent creates more of a wind profile as its sat 3" higher up that it needs to be but it works. The reason I moved it to the front is a) the ladder is easier to use as it is at less of an angle, b) my girlfriend is only 5ft 4" and she couldn't do anthing with the tent at the back but at the front she can stand on the bonnet and open / close it. As to the shade thing over the rear door, it might help a bit but I'm surprised if anyone is actually using it as a showering point, primarily because it would turn the main access point round the rear door of the vehicle into a muddy mess in most places.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 16 Aug 2004
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Belgium
Posts: 473
Last weekend placed our tent on the front section of our roofrack. This was new for us and the car since we always placed it in the back. Reason is that I am finishing my roofrack and still have some modifications to do on the backside. But I need the tent to sleep in this week, so had to place it in the front.
By now I am sure we will place the tent back to the back section asap. Fuel consumption is the sole reason.
Seems that if the tent sits in the back, the front screen pushesh the wind up and it 'throws' itself over the tent on back of the roofrack.
With the tent in front the wind gets jammed between the roof and the tent. Causing quite a efficient wind buffer.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 16 Aug 2004
Gipper's Avatar
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Banff,Canada/Poole,UK
Posts: 748
Theres good and bad reasons for both ways of fitting them.
I fitted my Hannibal 1.2M at the rear on a Defender 90 and cut out the back of my Safety Devices rack, you get shade, protection from rain and wind whilst cooking and eating at the back door.
Being at the back still between the side rails its protected from all those lovely overhanging branches and sharp thorns that you get in the Sahel - a consideration as I didnt want the PU cover shredded...Mali is a good example of somewhere that will wreck your cover quite quickly.
With The Hannibal (and I think the Ezi Awn too) I can remove the bottom half of the ladder and move the vehicle if neccesary It does not rely on the ladder for all its support, I know you cant do this with a Brownchurch.
Downsides of rear mounting are that after a long days drive the back of the tent (above the door)is normally covered in dust and needs a light brush off before opening. If you mount the tent at the front then this does not happen.
With the tent mounted at the front the rear of the rack is free for any other gear you are carrying - gas bottles etc and much easier to access from your rear ladder than climbing up the front and over the bonnet.
Finally you all like to sleep with your heads higher than your feet right ??? if you mount it at the front you climb up, sit in and lie down ( the rear suspension is normally higher than front - so you would normally lie feet to the front of the vehicle), if you mount it at the rear you climb in sit down turn around and then lie down...Id always get my feet on my girlfriends pillow !!!
If you do fit your Roof Tent to the front or rear on a Land Rover make sure you use extra support bars from rack to bulkhead/rear body as the guttering is not strong enough to support heavy weight on its own over a long period of time - its only rated for 75kg including rack weight - you have been warned !
Just a word on The Hannibal - its a good tent - things that are not so good - the Fly sheet is pants - and I think the sprung poles are a poor design. In hot african weather in dry season the Hannibal was bloody good - more ventilation and cooler than any other (same as Ezi Awn) with the fly off - after prolonged rain though the fly is not up to the job.
The Brownchurch is a better designed tent - not as cool in the heat as the Hannibal, but more suited to travelling through Europe in winter and a rainy season, the fly sheet mounting with the gavanised supports is much better than the Hannibal / Ezi Awn method and the build quality is better.
Hope this is of help, Cheers Grif.
__________________
Cheers
Grif

'09 Suzuki DR650
'00 Discovery Series 2 V8
'95 Defender 90 300 Tdi Overlander
http://gipperstravels.blogspot.com/
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 24 Aug 2004
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Belgium
Posts: 473
From the last post I understand that the edge (gutter?) were the roofrack sits in is not strong enough over a longer period of time. Wich I can easely believe.
I can see how you can bring the weight down to the main structure of the car at the front. But how to do this in the back of the car?
Any pictures? I have a serie III


Pieter.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 24 Aug 2004
ctc ctc is offline
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Lincolnshire, England
Posts: 249
Ref supporting the roofrack on the rear:

On the "Brownchurch" expedition model for LR's, the rear of the rack is supported by a ladder on one side, which takes the weight down to the rear cross member / bumber. And on the other side by a bar which comes down off the roofrack to waistline of the vehicle (ie where the hard top sits on the rear tray) and bolts through the body.

The front of the rack has support bars which attach to the pillar brackets at the bottom of your windscreen.

Ref pictures go to brownchurch's website: www.brownchurch.co.uk



Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


 
 
 

NEW! HU 2015 Motorcycle Adventure Travel Calendar is now available! Get your copy now for some terrific travel inspiration!

HUGE, 11.5 x 16.5 inches, beautifully printed in Germany on top quality stock! Photos are the winning images from over 600 entries in the 9th Annual HU Photo Contest!

Horizons Unlimited 2015 Motorcycle Adventure Travel Calendar.

"The calendar is magnificent!"

"I just wanted to say how much I'm loving the new, larger calendar!"

We share the profit with the winning photographers. YOU could be in the HU Calendar too - enter here!


HU DVD Autumn Special!

Take 40% off Road Heroes Part 1 until October 31 only!

Road Heroes features tales of adventure, joy and sheer terror by veteran travellers Peter and Kay Forwood (193 countries two-up on a Harley); Dr. Greg Frazier (5 times RTW); Tiffany Coates (RTW solo female); and Rene Cormier (University of Gravel Roads).

The first in an exciting new series, Road Heroes features tales of adventure, joy and sheer terror by veteran travellers."Inspiring and hilarious!"

"I loved watching this DVD!"

"Lots of amazing stories and even more amazing photographs, it's great fun and very inspirational."

"Wonderful entertainment!"

Check it out at the HU Store! Remember to use Coupon Code 'HEROES' on your order when you checkout.


Renedian Adventures


Renedian Adventures

What others say about HU...

"I just wanted to say thanks for doing this and sharing so much with the rest of us." Dave, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the DVD series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring! The new look of the website is very impressive, updated and catchy. Thank you so very much!" Jennifer, Canada

"...Great site. Keep up the good work." Murray and Carmen, Australia

"We just finished a 7 month 22,000+ mile scouting trip from Alaska to the bottom of Chile and I can't tell you how many times we referred to your site for help. From how to adjust your valves, to where to stay in the back country of Peru. Horizons Unlimited was a key player in our success. Motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world are in debt to your services." Alaska Riders

contest pic

10th Annual HU Travellers Photo Contest is on now! This is an opportunity for YOU to show us your best photos and win prizes!

NEW! HU 2014 Adventure Travel T-shirts! are now available in several colors! Be the first kid on your block to have them! New lower prices on synths!

HU 2014 T-shirts now in!

Check out the new Gildan Performance cotton-feel t-shirt - 100% poly, feels like soft cotton!


What turns you on to motorcycle travel?


Global Rescue, WORLDwide evacuation services for EVERYONE

Global Rescue is the premier provider of medical, security and evacuation services worldwide and is the only company that will come to you, wherever you are, and evacuate you to your home hospital of choice. Additionally, Global Rescue places no restrictions on country of citizenship - all nationalities are eligible to sign-up!


New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80 G/S motorcycle.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events (22 this year!); we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, the HUBB or to receive the e-zine. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.


Books & DVDs

amazon

All the best travel books and videos listed and often reviewed on HU's famous Books page. Check it out and get great travel books from all over the world.


Motorcycle Express for shipping and insurance!

Motorcycle Express

MC Air Shipping, (uncrated) USA / Canada / Europe and other areas. Be sure to say "Horizons Unlimited" to get your $25 discount on Shipping!
Insurance - see: For foreigners traveling in US and Canada and for Americans and Canadians traveling in other countries, then mail it to MC Express and get your HU $15 discount!




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 09:21.