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-   -   Landrover Defender TD5 OK in the desert? (http://www.horizonsunlimited.com/hubb/4wd-overland-tech/landrover-defender-td5-ok-desert-13425)

romke 19 Jul 2001 03:09

Landrover Defender TD5 OK in the desert?
 
I've been to Mauritania and Lybia with my old Defender 300 TDI and never had a problem. I'm now the owner of a TD5, and I've read some alarming articles about the reliability of the TD5 in Africa, particularly about it coping with poor diesel quality, and the reliability of the electronics in desert situations. Can anyone reassure me that I can take a TD5 to Africa without losing it somewhere in the dunes?

Roman 19 Jul 2001 05:18

Romke,
On a trip to the Moroccan Sahara last year we had two TD5's in the group. They performed very well and never missed a beat. (the only LR that had problems was a hybrid with a VM engine implant). I think it's fair to assume that driven sensibly they should not give a problem. In a long run, fuel quality and serviceability may be a factor, though. Better keep the vital electronics and sensors in your spares box.

------------------
Roman (UK)
www.polandrover.com

james stephenson 23 Jul 2001 19:27


Hello Romke,

My Td5 Defender has been to Morocco in 42degC heat and last year Tunisia and Algeria on Chris Scott's tour.
This autumn, I will be driving London-Timbuktu-London with 2 other Td5 Defenders...

As you know, the Td5 is fine in mud, snow, rocks, mountains etc - but what about sand and heat..?

Well, the Td5 had no problems with deep/soft sand dune crossing. Even with ETC fitted, it never actually cut-in, so was not fooled by the wheel spin conditions.

As for heat, it works fine - the temp gauge never moving from the 'warmed-up' needle position that is normal in the UK.

Fuel quality was no problem - but no harm in carrying a spare fuel filter...
If the water in fuel alarm light stays on, it is a 5 minute job to drain the water from the system using the valve with no subsequent priming needed.

Beacuse your vehicle is newer, it is less likely to have problems (!).
General problems such as tyres, cooling, filters, oil seal leaks, suspension, gearbox etc are in the same category as for older LRs - you should be able to fix it some how either by your self or with some help and keep going.
The general concern is with the computer/electronics. Of course no one mentions that all the modern Toyotas etc have the same level of sophistication...
If it is a concern, it may be worth buying a spare set (dealers can do a Sale or Return deal, often charging 15% service), but of course you would have to learn how to change it safely without static problems etc...

Generally, I wouldn't worry about it - the Td5 is a fine machine with probably less problems than any other newish car - it's just that we get to hear about the small amount of bad news more quickly in Land Rover circles.

Good luck,
James

Terry Davies 26 Jul 2001 14:56

I suggest you fit a Powerplus Fuel Unit to take care of "dirty" fuel. It was originally designed in WW2 to enable Spitfires to fly on low quality Russian fuel and really does work.

Almassy 27 Jul 2001 02:44

Take care. I and my TD5 we have been living in Egypt and travelling the desert now for 10 months. It is true - the car is reliable. Nevertheless bad Diesel may easily ruin the high pressure Diesel pump which is located in the tank. It happened to me on Sinai when running out of Diesel and buying some doubtful stuff from the Bedouins... I know 3 TD5 owner in Cairo - and 3 out of 3 have already replaced the pump once or more often. Take care on your Diesel or have a pump with your spare parts. I do both...

romke 6 Aug 2001 23:01

Thanks folks! I'll report back here upon my return,

Romke

marker 19 Dec 2008 09:22

Quote:

Originally Posted by romke (Post 58846)
Thanks folks! I'll report back here upon my return,

Romke

and he never did. Or never returned...

uk_vette 20 Dec 2008 14:18

Well looks like the old adage strikes again.

1. If you want to go into the desert, take a Land Rover.
2. If you want to come back again, take a Land Cruiser.:thumbup1:

Piotr 21 Dec 2008 11:39

Hi,
very very funny :clap: - but I've got LR :oops2:.
Anyway I must admitt both above points were accomplished. My LR90 (improved by myself) went to Libia and back in one piece without any outage.

Piotr

kitmax 21 Dec 2008 22:32

Carry on Land Rovering
 
Hi UK_Vedette
Let's start this season of goodwill by commenting enthusiastically on your adage
1. If you want to go into the desert, take a Land Rover.
2. If you want to come back again, take a Land Cruiser.
BOLLOCKS
Regards - from Land Rover users everywhere :) !!!

idrubie 23 Dec 2008 07:29

Quote:

Originally Posted by james stephenson (Post 58843)
The general concern is with the computer/electronics. Of course no one mentions that all the modern Toyotas etc have the same level of sophistication...

I love Toyota vs Land Rover banter. Are you honestly suggesting LR electronics \ connectors etc are as reliable as Toyota ones? :rofl:

Huskynose 18 Feb 2009 15:33

The difference between a broken down Landrover and any other broken down 4X4 is that the 4X4 can't be driven because it's being fixed and the Landrover can't be fixed because it's being driven :thumbup1:

uk_vette 18 Feb 2009 17:14

Quote:

Originally Posted by kitmax (Post 219745)
Hi UK_Vedette
Let's start this season of goodwill by commenting enthusiastically on your adage
1. If you want to go into the desert, take a Land Rover.
2. If you want to come back again, take a Land Cruiser.
BOLLOCKS
Regards - from Land Rover users everywhere :) !!!

.
.
.
:rofl:
.
Glad you liked it.

I have another for you..
.
The saying go's, by land Rover's OWN admission.

They told us, , , , ,

"80 % of all Land Rovers ever made are still on the road today"

You do remember the TV advert don't you ?
.
.
So, does that mean that if 80% are still on the road, then logic says the other 20 % "MADE IT HOME"
.
:rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl::r ofl:

sashadidi 20 Mar 2009 09:42

Quote:

Originally Posted by uk_vette (Post 219612)
Well looks like the old adage strikes again.

1. If you want to go into the desert, take a Land Rover.
2. If you want to come back again, take a Land Cruiser.:thumbup1:


Really read this Page from about half way down about Real use of FWDS,
My friend works up in the mountains of Sarwak as aircraft mechanic, Landcruisers rust out(after 2to 3years and get moisture/electronics problems just like landrovers (shock horror, can it be true?) Landrovers DO not rust anywhere near as much as have a much longer useable life under harsh condistions such as Sarawak
japanese is not better or worse, all have problems
Nissans Patrols in Australia are famous for breaking rear suspensions etc, Toyota do have engine and elctronic problems also now they have computers in their engines
Newer cars are not as reliable as the Older models were when they were Brand New
Want a tough reliable truck for harsh conditions buy a Russian Kamaz or Ural

Which Expediton vehicles and why? - Page 2 - Land Rover UK Forums

richleb 21 Dec 2009 01:08

all that I can say is....
 
I have a landcruiser with 241,500 miles, it's all original, and it runs great. No electronics.


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