Go Back   Horizons Unlimited - The HUBB > 4 wheels > 4WD Overland Tech

4WD Overland Tech GENERIC 4WD / 4 wheel TECH discussions and info that is valid for ALL brands. See brand specific forums.
Contact Overland Solutions for all your custom modifications and setup for overland travel.

Visit Matt Savage for VIAIR compressors, Air Lift Helper Springs, Tyre Levers, Chris Scott's Books & DVDs, KC Daylighters, Allisport Intercoolers, Overland Preparation and lots more!

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #16  
Old 10 Jan 2008
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Shandong, CHINA
Posts: 654
I think on a 120 Prado / Land Cruiser, the one on the back door, and one on the roof would be good insurance.
If I was traveling UK and East coast of Af. down to C.T. I would be upset if I had to resort to using the second spare.

How much weight could I carry in the roof of a 120 series?

I would plan to fit 4 / 5 cross roof bars between the standard fitment roof rails./

G.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 10 Jan 2008
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: granada,spain
Posts: 152
Its All About Terrain

Until four years ago I used to do extensive driving on sand and rock tracks in the Middle East over a period of many years.I found this extremely unforgiving on tyres and never wore a set(or even one)out.They all used to be destroyed by side wall damage from rocks and vegetation.My worse case was North of a place called Shisr in Southern Oman where I destroyed 3 tyres in one day in VERY REMOTE circumstances.Fortunately I always used steel rims and 150km and one roughed up but,not buggered rim later limped into Thumrait exhausted from the stress of it all.

For me,if you are doing any offroading rather than just overlanding,it would be 2 steel rims and spares every time.Chuck away the Gizmos,spare saucepans and evening suit instead!
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 10 Jan 2008
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: London, UK
Posts: 119
14 punctures in 40,000 miles, (where did i go wrong?? - especially as most of those miles were on north/central american tarmac) - my vote definitly goes for two spares!

Huey
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 11 Jan 2008
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Ghana
Posts: 289
Prado Roof Load

The roof load for a Prado should not exceed 100kgs - including the weight of the roof bars/rack themselves! But personally I really dislike big loads up top so on my roof there is only the roof tent, folding table and chairs. No wheels, jerry cans or other big heavy items.

Gil
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 11 Jan 2008
roamingyak.org's Avatar
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Portugal
Posts: 1,060
Remember you can always sell a tyre/wheel if you take it and then really feel like you don't need it. If it's a good brand you should get good money for it.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 11 Jan 2008
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Shandong, CHINA
Posts: 654
Quote:
Originally Posted by gilghana1 View Post
The roof load for a Prado should not exceed 100kgs - including the weight of the roof bars/rack themselves! But personally I really dislike big loads up top so on my roof there is only the roof tent, folding table and chairs. No wheels, jerry cans or other big heavy items.

Gil
,
,
Thanks Gil,

I thought it would be around that sort of weight.
As a matter of interest, what sort of weight do you think some travelers may have loaded the roof up with?

graham
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 11 Jan 2008
Robbert's Avatar
Contributing Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Gent, Belgium
Posts: 486
Quote:
Originally Posted by Huey View Post
14 punctures in 40,000 miles, (where did i go wrong?? - especially as most of those miles were on north/central american tarmac) - my vote definitly goes for two spares!

Huey
Hard to say off course.

Tubes on tubeless rims?
Old/worn tyres?
Too low tyre pressure?
Too heavy vehicle?
Stickers in the tyre chafing the tube?
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 11 Jan 2008
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Netherlands
Posts: 465
where did you go wrong?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Huey View Post
14 punctures in 40,000 miles, (where did i go wrong?? - especially as most of those miles were on north/central american tarmac) - my vote definitly goes for two spares!

Huey
Cheap tyres ? no go
Split rims ? noooo go
Worn Tyres ? hard to avoid

Which was it.

We got our 5 punctures only after our tyres were down to 40%! (1 nail, 4 acacia thorns)

Cheers,
Noel
exploreafrica.web-log.nl
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 11 Jan 2008
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Netherlands
Posts: 465
tyre pressure

Quote:
Originally Posted by tony johnston View Post
Until four years ago I used to do extensive driving on sand and rock tracks in the Middle East over a period of many years.I found this extremely unforgiving on tyres and never wore a set(or even one)out.They all used to be destroyed by side wall damage from rocks and vegetation.My worse case was North of a place called Shisr in Southern Oman where I destroyed 3 tyres in one day in VERY REMOTE circumstances.Fortunately I always used steel rims and 150km and one roughed up but,not buggered rim later limped into Thumrait exhausted from the stress of it all.

For me,if you are doing any offroading rather than just overlanding,it would be 2 steel rims and spares every time.Chuck away the Gizmos,spare saucepans and evening suit instead!
Tony,

When you go from sand to stones did you put air back into the tyres? Thats what i do. I do NOT drive stoney deserts on low pressures, even if it means deflating and inflating several times a day!


Cheers,
Noel
exploreafrica.web-log.nl
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 11 Jan 2008
Registered Users
HUBB regular
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: UK
Posts: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by noel di pietro View Post
what i am really looking for is how many people actually got into the situation where they needed the second spare
Noel

Earlier this year we were crossing Mongolia with two Transit vans with different wheels (bad planning I know!). One van carried two spares and had three punctures within an hour. We couldn't break the bead to change/repair the tyre. We even tried running over the bead with the second van, but this didn't work. Ended up with a five hour trip to a town with repair facilities.

It can and does happen. The second van had four spares and needed three of them to get to repair facilities. Maybe off road tyres are easier to change.
__________________
Phil
www.wrinkliesontherun.com

Last edited by wrinkly; 11 Jan 2008 at 20:09.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 12 Jan 2008
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Shandong, CHINA
Posts: 654
When on the rocky section, as said earlier, get some real good pressure into the tyres.

Even if it means going above the recommended by up to 5 psi.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 12 Jan 2008
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Ghana
Posts: 289
Quote:
Originally Posted by uk_vette View Post
,
,
Thanks Gil,

I thought it would be around that sort of weight.
As a matter of interest, what sort of weight do you think some travelers may have loaded the roof up with?

graham
Well, on my Defender I was carrying a full length roofrack ("home made" and bloody heavy) which in itself must be about 50kgs, rooftent arond the same, second tyre&rim - damn heavy! and of course other odds and sods. Add on a highlift or whatever and it starts to get pretty easy to hit 200kgs on the roof! Of course a lot of folk also have jerry cans up there as well.

frankly the difference between my Defender in touring mode and jungle mode was too much - a bit of a side slope or unnexpected swerve could really ruin your day! On my vehicle now I only put rooftent (on two light weight Thule bars) and a part sheet of plywood (also on two thule bars) to lash down some folding camp chairs and table. Much, much better. I have not mastered the art of travelling lightly, but not on the roof!

I am not really sure how the roof of a Defender is fixed (blue tack maybe :-) but on bumps the whole roof assembly sort of vibrated independent of the rest of the vehicle!!
Gil
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 12 Jan 2008
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Shandong, CHINA
Posts: 654
Hi Gil,


My initial idea was 2 sets of roof bars, like Thurl's and 2 full width roof boxes, obviously, set one behind the other.
These would be stashed with all the light bulky stuff that one needs to take.

Then I was also thinking along the line of 4 ~ 5 Thurl roof bars, fastened to the built on roof rails.

Then like you suggest, some 6 ~ 7 mm ply wood as a base.
During the day, the goodies could be stashed up there for the trip, then come night, throw them off, and set up a simple 2 man tent on the plywood,?

I just can't decide if I would get fed-up throwing the stuff off the roof platform every night, make the tent, then have the task of lifting the damn stuff back up the following morning!
Reply With Quote
  #29  
Old 12 Jan 2008
silver G's Avatar
Gold Member
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: south Cumbria
Posts: 363
Bear in mind that you might need to store those 'goodies' in side the vehicle overnight

I made some roof bars from 100x10 mm alluminium bar bent to the profile of the roof, with 10mm clearance. Bend it with a gas torch so no stresses, clamp to the roof gutter - low profile, long contact, cooling air underneath, minimal weight and less noise/turbulance from wind on the motorway. rooftent bolted to this - simple and easy to live with - 2 bars have been there for 70,000 miles. If you had 2 more in front with a spare wheel mount it would be less than 80kg even with a roof tent. I think lifting boxes up and down will be a right royal pain in the arse.

If you do want to go down the plywood sheet and roofrack then have a look at brownchurch tents, they make one that stores at the front of the rack leaving room for more stuff, but I wouldn't have more than 60/70kg up there especially in dunes
This photo is with the spare tyre inside too
Attached Images
 
__________________
Chris
-----------------
"Never have a stupid argument with an idiot - he gets a lot more practice than you"
there I go again
not too hard really
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 13 Jan 2008
Registered Users
Veteran HUBBer
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Ghana
Posts: 289
Hi,
to be honest if it was me I reckon I would very quickly tire of climbing up, removing boxes and rigging a tent on a confined roof area - I am sure you would feel the same after a while and just be pitching on the ground. I know rooftent manufacturers expouse the advantages of being off the ground blah blah, but IMHO the biggest advantage of a roof tent is ease of setting up. With mine (hanibal) it is a quick jump onto roof (tyre, wing, bonnet, roof - easier and faster than any ladder) unzip it and unfold. Takes all of about 30 secs! If you are not going down the rooftop tent route then I would just pitch on the ground.
I think 4 or 5 roof bars is too much and probably two or three would be better (cheaper) but increase the ply thickness to 12mm or more as 6 or 7 is very bendy. Remember the ply should be ideally marine but WBP will also be okay. Interior ply (MR) will dissolve fairly fast in aggressive African conditions.

To be honest the rooftent is fantastic and worth the investment if you think about how much time you spend sleeping and how if you are tired/sick you don't want to spend time fighting pegs and ropes etc. I only wish I had bought a hard shelled one as that makes life even easier in terms of time and hassle!

I know we are getting a bit away from the two tyre discussion - apologies Noel!

Gil
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 Registered Users and/or Members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How to carry spare tyres? Chris of Motocross Africa TRAVEL Hints and Tips 22 25 Feb 2014 01:10
"Importing" spare tyres: problems? bijsterbosch Trip Paperwork 1 9 Aug 2007 21:18
Spare tyres trans Africa? Bevan Travellers' questions that don't fit anywhere else 5 13 Mar 2007 00:08
Spare tyres for Uk to OZ Richard Tyner Southern Asia 3 4 Oct 2003 18:30
Carrying spare tyres across borders iris_trui Equipping the Bike - what's the best gear? 5 18 Feb 2002 11:49

 
 


HU DVD Summer Special!

Now that summer is here, get On the Road! Take 30% off the Achievable Dream - On the Road! 2-DVD set until August 31 only. Get On the Road! Learn the tips to staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure!

Our veteran travellers share their tips (and great stories) for staying healthy, happy and secure on your motorcycle adventure.

"A fantastic, informative and inspirational DVD."

"It's brilliant - thank you very much!"

Check it out at the HU Store! Remember to use Coupon Code 'ONTHEROAD' on your order when you checkout.


Renedian Adventures

What others say about HU...

"I just wanted to say thanks for doing this and sharing so much with the rest of us." Dave, USA

"Your website is a mecca of valuable information and the DVD series is informative, entertaining, and inspiring! The new look of the website is very impressive, updated and catchy. Thank you so very much!" Jennifer, Canada

"...Great site. Keep up the good work." Murray and Carmen, Australia

"We just finished a 7 month 22,000+ mile scouting trip from Alaska to the bottom of Chile and I can't tell you how many times we referred to your site for help. From how to adjust your valves, to where to stay in the back country of Peru. Horizons Unlimited was a key player in our success. Motorcycle enthusiasts from around the world are in debt to your services." Alaska Riders

contest pic

10th Annual HU Travellers Photo Contest is on now! This is an opportunity for YOU to show us your best photos and win prizes!

NEW! HU 2014 Adventure Travel T-shirts! are now available in several colors! Be the first kid on your block to have them! New lower prices on synths!

HU 2014 T-shirts now in!

Check out the new Gildan Performance cotton-feel t-shirt - 100% poly, feels like soft cotton!


What turns you on to motorcycle travel?


Global Rescue, WORLDwide evacuation services for EVERYONE

Global Rescue is the premier provider of medical, security and evacuation services worldwide and is the only company that will come to you, wherever you are, and evacuate you to your home hospital of choice. Additionally, Global Rescue places no restrictions on country of citizenship - all nationalities are eligible to sign-up!


New to Horizons Unlimited?

New to motorcycle travelling? New to the HU site? Confused? Too many options? It's really very simple - just 4 easy steps!

Horizons Unlimited was founded in 1997 by Grant and Susan Johnson following their journey around the world on a BMW R80 G/S motorcycle.

Susan and Grant Johnson Read more about Grant & Susan's story

Membership - help keep us going!

Horizons Unlimited is not a big multi-national company, just two people who love motorcycle travel and have grown what started as a hobby in 1997 into a full time job (usually 8-10 hours per day and 7 days a week) and a labour of love. To keep it going and a roof over our heads, we run events (22 this year!); we sell inspirational and informative DVDs; we have a few selected advertisers; and we make a small amount from memberships.

You don't have to be a Member to come to an HU meeting, access the website, the HUBB or to receive the e-zine. What you get for your membership contribution is our sincere gratitude, good karma and knowing that you're helping to keep the motorcycle travel dream alive. Contributing Members and Gold Members do get additional features on the HUBB. Here's a list of all the Member benefits on the HUBB.


Books & DVDs

amazon

All the best travel books and videos listed and often reviewed on HU's famous Books page. Check it out and get great travel books from all over the world.


Motorcycle Express for shipping and insurance!

Motorcycle Express

MC Air Shipping, (uncrated) USA / Canada / Europe and other areas. Be sure to say "Horizons Unlimited" to get your $25 discount on Shipping!
Insurance - see: For foreigners traveling in US and Canada and for Americans and Canadians traveling in other countries, then mail it to MC Express and get your HU $15 discount!




All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:10.